June 3 George Floyd protest news

By Jessie Yeung, Steve George, Laura Smith-Spark, Peter Wilkinson, Meg Wagner, Melissa Macaya, Mike Hayes and Fernando Alfonso III, CNN

Updated 7:15 p.m. ET, June 4, 2020
84 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
5:12 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Former police officer Derek Chauvin has bail increased to $1 million

From CNN's Konstantin Toropin

Former police officer Derek Chauvin's bail has been increased to $1 million, according to the updated complaint filed today.

Chauvin is being held at the Minnesota Department of Corrections facility in Oak Park.

The increased bail amount coincides with the new charges of second-degree murder filed against him today.

The other three former officers all have bail set at $1 million, according to their court documents. However, of those three, only J. Alexander Kueng is in custody now.

 

5:14 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Minnesota attorney general says charges are "rooted in facts that we can prove"

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said that the charges made against four former policer officer were based on evidence that was "significant, it was important, and it bolstered our theory of what happened here."

"We work with our team, and we believe that the factual basis was there for this charge. It is an ethical charge, it's a charge rooted in facts that we can prove," he said.

"As you know, it's not allowable for me to comment on the evidence and talk about the investigation. But as information rolled in, it made it — it made it necessary for us to adjust these charges," Ellison told CNN this afternoon.

Some context: Three former Minneapolis police officers on the scene when George Floyd was killed have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter, Ellison announced earlier today.

Additionally, Ellison announced he's upgrading the charge against Derek Chauvin, the officer who had his knee pressed into Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, to second-degree murder.

Watch:

 

5:06 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Minnesota attorney general says "sense of duty and responsibility" led him to file charges

From CNN’s Andy Rose

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said a “sense of duty and responsibility” led him to file charges against all four officers involved in the death of George Floyd.

“I can honestly tell you I take no joy in this,” Ellison told reporters Wednesday.

“I feel a tremendous sense of weight. I feel this is a very serious moment,” he added.

About the charges: Derek Chauvin, who pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, had previously been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. The new second-degree murder charge says that he killed Floyd "without intent" in the course of committing assault in the third degree, according to an amended complaint.

Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng, who helped restrain Floyd, and Tou Thao, who stood near the others, were not initially charged. Lane, 37, Kueng, 26, and Thao, 34, are now charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

4:53 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Minneapolis mayor says "complicity cannot be tolerated" when it comes to 4 former officers

From CNN's Shawn Nottingham

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey issued a statement this afternoon regarding charging decisions on the four police former officers involved in George Frey’s death.

"That George Floyd’s plea – that his struggle to survive – went unrecognized and unaided by not just one but four officers will live forever as the most chilling moments in our city’s history. Failing to act amounted to a failure to recognize George’s humanity. As Chief [Medaria] Arradondo has stated, silence is complicity, and complicity cannot be tolerated." Frey said in a statement.

Earlier today: Three former Minneapolis police officers on the scene when George Floyd was killed have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder, Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison announced today.

Additionally, Ellison announced he's upgrading the charge against Derek Chauvin, the officer who had his knee pressed into Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, to second-degree murder.

 

4:48 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Former President Jimmy Carter: "We all must shine a spotlight on the immorality of racial discrimination"

From CNN's Betsy Klein

Former President Jimmy Carter became the latest — and final — living former president to weigh in on the death of George Floyd, who was killed while in police custody last week.

"Rosalynn and I are pained by the tragic racial injustices and consequent backlash across our nation in recent weeks. Our hearts are with the victims' families and all who feel hopeless in the face of pervasive racial discrimination and outright cruelty. We all must shine a spotlight on the immorality of racial discrimination. But violence, whether spontaneous or consciously incited, is not a solution," Carter said in a statement.

Carter went on to say that he feels he has "a responsibility to bring equity to my state and our country."

The former president referenced remarks he made in 1971 during his inaugural address as Georgia's governor.

"The time for racial discrimination is over," he said at the time.

"With great sorrow and disappointment, I repeat those words today, nearly five decades later. Dehumanizing people debases us all; humanity is beautifully and almost infinitely diverse. The bonds of our common humanity must overcome the divisiveness of our fears and prejudices," Carter said in his statement today.

5:06 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

New charges for former officers were not influenced by protests, Ellison says

From CNN’s Andy Rose

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison says the elevated murder charge for former officer Derek Chauvin and new charges for three other former officers were not influenced by the public outcry in the George Floyd case, nor the fact that a public memorial is scheduled for Thursday.

“I did not allow public pressure to impact our decision-making process,” Ellison said at the news conference announcing the new charges. “I was prepared to withstand whatever calls came. We made these decisions based on the facts we have gathered since this matter occurred.”

 

5:06 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Minnesota attorney general says conviction of officers in George Floyd case "will be hard"

From CNN’s Andy Rose

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison warned the Minneapolis community Wednesday that while all four officers involved in the death of George Floyd were charged, bringing a case against police is always challenging.

“Trying this case will not be an easy thing,” Ellison said at a news conference. “Winning a conviction will be hard.”

Ellison noted that his partner in the prosecution, Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman, is the only Minnesota prosecutor who has ever successfully prosecuted a police officer for murder.

“We’re confident in what we’re doing, but history does show that there are clear challenges here,” Ellison said.

Watch:

 

5:01 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

1 of 3 former officers charged with aiding and abetting is in custody

One of the three former Minneapolis police officers who are charged with aiding and abetting murder in the death of George Floyd has been taken into custody, said Drew Evans, the superintendent of the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

Officials are in the process of taking the other two into custody, and Evans said he expects them to be in custody later this afternoon.

He did not say which of the three officers was in custody, but Hennepin County Sheriff's website records show J. Alexander Kueng is in custody.

The site offers no other information or details.

4:28 p.m. ET, June 3, 2020

Minnesota attorney general says charges are "justified by the facts and the law"

CNN
CNN

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said the new charges filed against all four officers involved in the death of George Floyd are "justified by the facts and the law."

"We gathered all the facts we could, we reviewed the criminal statutes, we looked at case law, we consulted with each other, and we arrived at these charges. We believe they are justified by the facts and the law," he said.

Asked about the possible impact of the charges on people across the country, Ellison responded, "The pursuit of justice is always good and right. And I want to signal to them that we hope that they continue to raise the cause of justice but do it in a peaceful manner. It is their right to express themselves. And with that I will say they should continue in their own communities to get together, to build a just police-community relationship. We need the faith community to be involved. We need arts and entertainment to inspire us towards justice. We need everybody. There is a lot more to do than just this case and we ask people to do that."

Watch: