June 4 George Floyd protest news

By Jessie Yeung, Steve George, Laura Smith-Spark, Peter Wilkinson, Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes and Fernando Alfonso III, CNN

Updated 0428 GMT (1228 HKT) June 5, 2020
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10:02 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

Sacramento police investigating neck restraint use on 18-year-old

From CNN's Stella Chan

Police in Sacramento, California, are investigating officers’ use of a neck restraint tactic on a teenager Monday, which was captured on amateur video.

“The video captures the end of an incident where officers were attempting to effect an arrest for looting,” said officer Karl Chan in a statement to CNN.

Police say Tyzhon Johnson, 18, was actively looting a business and ran when they attempted to detain him. 

“Johnson was arrested on looting charges and resisting arrest. He was booked into the Sacramento County Main Jail. The use of force has been documented and will be reviewed per department policy as with any use of force,” according to police.

Johnson was released on Tuesday, according to Sacramento county jail records.

CNN is pursuing the amateur video and comment from Johnson.

10:46 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

Additional fencing built around the White House

From CNN's Betsy Klein 

A person protests behind a fence near the White House on June 2.
A person protests behind a fence near the White House on June 2. Alex Brandon/AP

Despite consecutive days of peaceful protests, construction of additional fencing along the White House complex began before dawn Thursday – perhaps illustrating security concerns ahead of the weekend.

A truck containing stacked metal fencing was parked on 17th street, workers installing the fence beside the Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB) before 6 a.m. ET.

By 8 a.m. ET, the fencing extended well past the EEOB toward Constitution Ave.

This is in addition to the fencing that went up at 17th and Pennsylvania Avenue and along H Street earlier this week.

At the 17th and Pennsylvania intersection, workers were seen installing reinforcing concrete barriers behind that fencing.

Watch:

1:08 p.m. ET, June 4, 2020

Time magazine's latest front cover spotlights Floyd protests

The June issue of Time Magazine. The issue, "A Nation Torn," is a special report on the protests surrounding the death of George Floyd. The cover features a painting by artist Titus Kaphar.
The June issue of Time Magazine. The issue, "A Nation Torn," is a special report on the protests surrounding the death of George Floyd. The cover features a painting by artist Titus Kaphar. Time Magazine

The new issue of Time magazine is a special report on the protests surrounding the death of George Floyd. 

The cover image features a painting by artist Titus Kaphar, who also created a painting for Time in 2014 marking the protests in Ferguson.

According to a statement by the magazine, for the first time, the red border of Time’s front page includes the names of people: 35 black men and women whose deaths, in many cases by police, were the result of systemic racism and helped fuel the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement. 

9:30 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

New Orleans Saints quarterback apologizes for "insensitive" comments

From CNN's Homero DeLaFuente

Drew Brees of the New Orleans Saints is pictured before a game in Charlotte, North Carolina, on December 29, 2019.
Drew Brees of the New Orleans Saints is pictured before a game in Charlotte, North Carolina, on December 29, 2019. Jacob Kupferman/Getty Images

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees issued an apology Thursday for his "insensitive" comments made yesterday in an interview with Yahoo Finance.   

"I would like to apologize to my friends, teammates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday. In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused," Brees said. 

Brees was met with backlash after saying he will "never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag," a reference to players taking a knee in protest during NFL games.

"In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country. They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character," Brees continued. 

He concluded the apology by saying, "I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy. I am sick about the way my comments were perceived yesterday, but I take full responsibility and accountability. I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening...and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen.For that, I am very sorry and I ask your forgiveness."

Some of Brees' teammates and other professional athletes quickly criticized his remarks. Black players make up about 70% of the NFL.

Read Brees' apology on Instagram:

9:15 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

Ex-NBA player and Floyd friend explains how his death has "changed the world"

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

Stephen Jackson, former NBA player and friend of George Floyd, on CNN's "New Day" on June 4.
Stephen Jackson, former NBA player and friend of George Floyd, on CNN's "New Day" on June 4. CNN

Stephen Jackson, former NBA player and friend of George Floyd, said that Floyd’s death could be a catalyst for justice across the world. 

“They said that this conviction would not fix all the Freddie Grays, the Philando Castiles, the Trayvon Martins; it might not fix those, but for black people, it may … This can be a big step in fixing things and getting justice for black people,” he said in an interview with CNN’s John Berman. 

This week, Jackson posted video of Floyd’s 6-year-old daughter Gianna on his shoulders saying “Daddy changed the world.”

“It was emotional. I just want to lift her spirits. I want her next days to be her best days. That's all I care about,” Jackson said. “…I am my brother's keeper, so I'm going to do that.”

Jackson discussed how exactly Floyd has “changed the world.” 

“We’ve never seen 50 states protest at one time. Look around the world. In Iran — every place you can name — Somalia, France, the Netherlands, I've been getting pictures from everywhere in support of justice for my brother George Floyd,” he said.

Jackson said that Floyd would be smiling if he saw what was happening across the country and the world right now. 

“I just see the smile on his face. … This is a guy that showed love for everybody, he tried his best to be a protector and provider for everybody,” Jackson said. “The love that everybody [is] showing him is the way he showed love to everybody else.” 

Jackson also said he strongly disagrees with New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees’ comments on players kneeling during the national anthem. Brees said he will “never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag.”

Jackson said Brees is missing the point of players’ actions. 

“As intelligent as Drew Brees is, how is he still that naive?” Jackson said. 

“If you're not with us, if you're not standing on the side of right, then obviously you are the problem, or you are part of the problem. … There’s no more straddling the fence. Either you're with us or you're against us. And obviously, by his comment, he's not with us. But I love the fact that his teammates stood up and spoke, because they know him best, but we can’t…tolerate that no more. You’re either with us or against us,” he added. 

Watch more:

8:05 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

Beyoncé urges fans to remain "focused" in fight for justice for George Floyd

By CNN's Toyin Owoseje

Beyoncé Knowles-Carter attends an event in Brooklyn, New York, on October 17, 2017.
Beyoncé Knowles-Carter attends an event in Brooklyn, New York, on October 17, 2017. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for TIDAL

Beyoncé Knowles-Carter is encouraging her fans to remain "focused" in the fight for justice for George Floyd.

The Grammy-winning artist shared a poignant message on Instagram Wednesday, which featured an aerial photo of thousands of Black Lives Matter demonstrators filling the streets of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Accompanying the picture were the words: "The world came together for George Floyd. We know there is a long road ahead. Let's remain aligned and focused in our call for real justice."

Read more here:

8:44 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

George Floyd's family is set to honor him as a nation demands justice for his death

From CNN's Nicole Chavez

Terrence Floyd, George Floyd's brother, visits a makeshift memorial in Minneapolis on June 1.
Terrence Floyd, George Floyd's brother, visits a makeshift memorial in Minneapolis on June 1. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

George Floyd's death inspired a national movement and forced his family to demand justice. Now, it's time for them to celebrate his life.

The first in a series of memorial services honoring Floyd will take place Thursday afternoon.

His family, friends and a number of guests will gather at the North Central University in Minneapolis. Rev. Al Sharpton, the founder of the National Action Network, will deliver a eulogy to honor Floyd's life.

"We must turn this moment into a movement," Sharpton told reporters on Wednesday, describing Floyd as a "linchpin" for police accountability.

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said Thursday's memorial would be a chance for everyone to heal. 

"It's critically important for them to see and for Minnesotans to display to them that there's another side to us and to this state that they didn't see last Monday night," Walz said on Wednesday.

Anyone who met Floyd couldn't miss seeing him. He was 6 feet 4 inches tall, a "gentle giant."

"Knowing my brother is to love my brother," Philonise Floyd, George's brother, told CNN's Don Lemon.

"He's a gentle giant, he don't hurt anybody."

Read more here:

8:44 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

George Floyd's friend who was in the car with him details his last moments

From CNN's Faith Karimi

People visit a memorial on June 3 at the site where George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis.
People visit a memorial on June 3 at the site where George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis. Scott Olson/Getty Images

George Floyd pleaded with officers before his death in Minneapolis, asking them why they were detaining him and not resisting arrest in any way, a friend who was with him said.

Maurice Lester Hall, 42, was with Floyd in the car during the arrest that led to his death, The New York Times reported. It said it tracked him down in Houston, where he fled two days after he witnessed the death.

In an interview with the paper, Hall described Floyd as a mentor and fellow Houston native, saying they spent most of Memorial Day together before the fatal police encounter.

"He was, from the beginning, trying in his humblest form to show he was not resisting in no form or way," Hall told the paper Wednesday night. "I could hear him pleading, 'Please, officer, what's all this for?'"

Throngs of protesters have taken to the streets since Floyd died on May 25 to demand the arrest of all four officers involved. Authorities initially arrested Derek Chauvin, the officer who pinned Floyd to the ground by his neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds before he died. On Wednesday, they upgraded the murder charges against him and charged three other former officers who were at the scene with aiding and abetting the killing.

Hall said he'll never forget what he saw that day.

"He was just crying out at that time for anyone to help because he was dying," Hall told the paper. "I'm going to always remember seeing the fear in Floyd's face because he's such a king. That's what sticks with me, seeing a grown man cry, before seeing a grown man die."

After days of protests, Thursday will be a bittersweet day as Floyd's family holds a memorial for him and three of the four officers arrested make their first court appearance.

Read more here:

4:49 a.m. ET, June 4, 2020

Some YouTubers are donating their ad revenue to the Black Lives Matter movement

From CNN's Saba Hamedy and Francesca Hoffman

Thousands across the US have taken to the streets to protest, or opened their wallets to donate to help support the Black Lives Matter movement.

But not everyone who wants to donate can afford to, and not everyone who wants to protest can leave their jobs to demonstrate.

Zoe Amira, a 20-year-old YouTube creator, wanted to make it easier for those people to contribute to the cause simply by streaming a video. Her video, to be exact.

Titled "how to financially help BLM with NO MONEY/leaving your house (Invest in the future for FREE)," the hourlong video opens with text that reads: "Hello and thank you for clicking this video project. This video and the series that will soon follow are to serve as a fundraiser."

It goes on to note that 100% of the ad revenue will be donated to a list of organizations, including BlackLivesMatter.com, the ACLU, the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund, the Minnesota Freedom Fund, George Floyd's Family Gofundme and a handful of other nonprofits. The rest of the video features art made by black creators.

Amira, who lives in the Chicago area, calls this form of activism "ad-tivism." Whatever it may be deemed, it's seemingly caught on: The video's amassed over 5 million views, and counting, so far.

"I think it's opening the door for people-powered fundraising, and that's what's really exciting about it," Amira, who has about 56,000 subscribers to her channel, told CNN."It's a low barrier to entry -- you don't need much to support something you believe in."

Several other YouTube creators have since followed her lead. Read more here: