June 12 Black Lives Matter protests

By Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner, Jessie Yeung, Steve George, Helen Regan and Laura Smith-Spark, CNN

Updated 0408 GMT (1208 HKT) June 13, 2020
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7:37 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

Protests continue to grow across the United States

It's been nearly three weeks since the death of George Floyd at the hands of a police officer and protesters are still on the streets across the country.

Hundreds of protesters in Minneapolis are marching Friday night, saying they don't believe enough has been done in response to Floyd's death.

Here's a look at the protests across the country:

Minneapolis

Nekima Levy Armstrong, civil rights lawyer, speaks during a rally outside the Minneapolis Police and Fire Union Office on June 12 in Minneapolis.
Nekima Levy Armstrong, civil rights lawyer, speaks during a rally outside the Minneapolis Police and Fire Union Office on June 12 in Minneapolis. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Washington, DC

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Pool

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Seattle

Demonstrators walk during a Black Lives Matter of Seattle-King County silent march on June 12 in Seattle, Washington.
Demonstrators walk during a Black Lives Matter of Seattle-King County silent march on June 12 in Seattle, Washington. Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Los Angeles

Lora King, Rodney King's daughter, left with the megaphone, holds a Black Lives Matter protest at Venice Beach on June 12.
Lora King, Rodney King's daughter, left with the megaphone, holds a Black Lives Matter protest at Venice Beach on June 12. Damian Dovarganes/AP

6:59 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

New Jersey police officer charged with assault after allegedly deploying pepper spray

From CNN’s Taylor Romine

A New Jersey police officer was charged with two counts of assault on Wednesday after allegedly deploying pepper spray on two people “without provocation,” the Camden County Prosecutor's office said in a statement

Ryan Dubiel, 31, a police officer with Woodlynne Police Department, was charged with two counts of simple assault, prosecutors announced.

Dubiel and another officer were dispatched on a call in the afternoon of June 4 for a complaint of possible trespassing and loitering, according to a recording of a 911 call released by prosecutors.

The details: Body camera footage was also released by prosecutors and shows Dubiel talking with several young men sitting on a front porch.

An officer is heard on the video telling the young men they are responding to a call for trespassing. Officers are seen on video asking the people on the porch for their names and other identifying information, but many refuse. One of the young men goes to call his brother and Dubiel tells him to put his phone down. When the person continues to call, Dubiel is seen proceeding to pepper spray multiple people.

In addition to the charges, Dubiel has been suspended from the department without pay. Dubiel has been with the Woodlynne Police Department for 10 months — this is the ninth police department where he has served, prosecutors said in a statement. 

It was not immediately clear if Dubiel retained an attorney. CNN has attempted to reach Dubiel for comment.

6:37 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

Georgia judge orders Confederate monument in Decatur Square be removed

From CNN's Jamiel Lynch

A DeKalb County judge ordered a monument in Decatur Square be relocated immediately.

Judge Clarence Seeliger issued the order Friday after the city argued the 30-foot obelisk had become a threat to public safety during recent protests.

After calling the obelisk a “figurative lighting rod for friction among citizens,” Seeliger said the monument should be removed by midnight on June 26 and placed into storage until further order by the court.

Seeliger also ordered the DeKalb County police and sheriff’s office provide support to Decatur police in preserving public safety in the square until the obelisk is removed.

CNN has reached out to Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for comment on the removal order.

6:48 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

Seattle police can no longer use chemical irritants or projectiles against peaceful protesters

From CNN’s Andy Rose

Police officers face off with demonstrators near the Seattle Police Department's East Precinct in Seattle, on June 6.
Police officers face off with demonstrators near the Seattle Police Department's East Precinct in Seattle, on June 6. David Ryder/Getty Images

The Seattle Police Department (SPD) can no longer use tear gas against peaceful protesters under a temporary restraining order issued Friday. 

Judge Richard Jones says police are prohibited from using any “chemical irritants or projectiles of any kind against persons peacefully engaging in protests or demonstrations.”

Some context: The order is in response to a lawsuit from a local Black Lives Matter chapter. 

The judge says there is evidence that the SPD used so-called “less lethal” weapons, at times, without provocation. 

“SPD’s use of less-lethal, crowd control weapons have surely chilled speech,” Jones wrote in his order, saying tear gas and police projectiles are known to be intensely painful. 

The federal court order says such weapons have sometimes been used against people who were not threatening officers, violating the First and Fourth Amendment rights of the protesters.

The judge’s order says that chemicals and projectiles may only be used by police when they are “targeted at the specific imminent threat of physical harm to themselves or identifiable others or to respond to specific acts of violence or destruction of property.”

6:44 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

Miami-Dade Police will no longer authorize use of "carotid triangle restraint"

From CNN’s Rosa Flores and Sara Weisfeldt 

Miami-Dade Police Department director Alfredo Ramirez III talks during the press conference at Miami-Dade Police Department Headquarters in Miami, on January 8.
Miami-Dade Police Department director Alfredo Ramirez III talks during the press conference at Miami-Dade Police Department Headquarters in Miami, on January 8. David Santiago/Miami Herald/AP

The Miami-Dade Police Department have said it will no longer authorize the use of “carotid triangle restraints.”

Police Director Alfredo Ramirez III said in a statement after review, he has decided to no longer authorize the utilization of that hold due to a multitude of factors, including officer and public safety, feedback from policing professionals, members of our community, local leaders and officials, and recommendations from the Police Executive Research Forum.

 

6:19 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

3 New York residents indicted in connection with Molotov cocktails attacks on NYPD vehicles

From CNN's Brian Vitagliano

A seven-count indictment was returned Thursday in federal court charging three New York residents in connection with Molotov cocktails attacks on New York City Police Department vehicles during the protests last month.

Samantha Shader, Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman are charged with the use of explosives, arson, use of explosives to commit a felony, arson conspiracy, use of a destructive device, civil disorder, and making or possessing a destructive device, according to a release from the US attorney’s office in Brooklyn.

According to court filings, Rahman was recorded on an NYPD surveillance camera allegedly throwing a Molotov cocktail at an NYPD vehicle last month during the protests in Brooklyn.

According to the indictment, after Rahman left the scene in a minivan, officers pursued and later arrested Rahman and also Mattis who was driving the van. Court documents reveal the NYPD found “several component items for Molotov cocktails, including a lighter, a bottle filled liquid suspected to be gasoline and toilet paper, additional bottles and toilet paper, and a gasoline canister.”

The indictment against Shader alleges she ignited a Molotov cocktail and threw it at an NYPD vehicle occupied be four police officers, shattering two of its windows. The scene, according to court filings, was captured on video by a witness who recorded the alleged event.

According to the US attorney’s office, the defendants, if convicted on all counts, face sentences of up to a life in prison.

6:00 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

New York governor: State's new police reform bill "40 and 50 years coming"

From CNN's Josiah Ryan

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing in New York, on June 12.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing in New York, on June 12. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the package of sweeping police reform bills he signed into law today "is not just about Mr. Floyd’s murder.” 

"This has been 40 and 50 years coming," Cuomo told CNN's Wolf Blitzer. "....Let's be honest and let’s restore the trust. Because if we don’t, the police can’t do their job and the community won’t feel safe.”

Earlier in the interview, Cuomo called the legislation "the most aggressive package banning chokeholds, turning over disciplinary records so there’s transparency."

The bills — vehemently opposed by a coalition of law enforcement unions — follow weeks of protests nationwide.

Legislative efforts targeting police violence have taken hold nationally after the deaths of several African Americans at the hands of the police, including George Floyd, who died in Minneapolis last month after a white police officer knelt on his neck for more than eight minutes.

CNN speaks with Gov. Cuomo:

5:37 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

Navajo Nation urges Congress to rename military bases after Native Americans

From CNN’s Konstantin Toropin

In this file photo, Jonathan Nez addresses a crowd after he was sworn in as president of the Navajo Nation in Fort Defiance, Arizona on January 15, 2019.
In this file photo, Jonathan Nez addresses a crowd after he was sworn in as president of the Navajo Nation in Fort Defiance, Arizona on January 15, 2019. Felicia Fonseca/AP

As Congress and the President debate the fate of military installations and assets named after Confederate leaders, the Navajo Nation is urging lawmakers and the White House to consider “Native American warriors who sacrificed and contributed to the development and longstanding history of the United States through their military service,” in a statement Friday.

“Despite our significant contributions to this great country, our military achievements and stories by our Native American warriors are often left untold,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said in the statement.

"The First Americans of this country should be the first to be recognized and honored through the renaming of the Fort Bragg military installation after a Native Veteran,” Nez added.

The Navajo’s most celebrated contribution to the military was the Navajo Code Talkers – a group of Navajo speakers who used the particularly challenging language as a secret code during World War II. The US military had also used the Choctaw language during World War I as part of its secret code, but Germany and Japan had worked to learn Choctaw and other Native American languages during the interwar period, according to the CIA.

However, Nez also noted that “our Native American warriors have served in every branch of the military at a higher rate than any other demographic in the United States.”

“The Navajo Nation calls upon our congressional leaders and federal partners to move forward with the renaming of military bases after Native American Service Members,” said Navajo Nation Vice President Myron Lizer.

“We also urge Congress to develop landmarks and monuments to help solidify the contributions of Native Americans within the landscape of American history,” Lizer added.

5:47 p.m. ET, June 12, 2020

Houston Texans head coach will kneel with players this season

From CNN’s Jacob Lev

Head coach Bill O'Brien of the Houston Texans looks on before the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, on September 9, 2018.
Head coach Bill O'Brien of the Houston Texans looks on before the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, on September 9, 2018. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Houston Texans head coach and general manager Bill O'Brien told the Houston Chronicle that he would kneel with players during the national anthem this coming NFL season.

“Yeah, I’ll take a knee,” O'Brien told John McClain of the Houston Chronicle. “I'm all for it. The players have a right to protest, a right to be heard and a right to be who they are. They’re not taking a knee because they’re against our flag. They’re taking a knee because they haven’t been treated equally in this country for over 400 years.”

A spokesperson for the Texans told CNN that O’Brien’s remarks to the Chronicle are accurate.