Tropical Storm Barry

8:00 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

"The calm before the storm is so deceiving": New Orleans residents brace themselves for Barry

As a dangerous weather system spinning toward the Gulf coast intensified Thursday to become Tropical Storm Barry, some Louisiana residents aren't taking any chances and are choosing to evacuate. Others say they plan to ride the storm out.

Heather Cafarella, 41, a bartender at R Bar, said people aren't panicked, but they are asking each other if they're going to evacuate.

"It's not just the hurricane. We flood when there's heavy rain. It doesn't take much, unfortunately," she said Thursday.

Looking outside at the sunny street, Cafarella said, "The calm before the storm is so deceiving."

Michael Nedelman/ CNN
Michael Nedelman/ CNN

Herb James, 38, has lived in New Orleans since he was 11.

He is renting a scooter, but it got stuck in a flood and isn't starting. James is worried about the storm and about having to pay the rental company for the damaged vehicle. He's crashing on friends' couches at the moment.

"If I have to evacuate, I don't have anywhere to evacuate to," James said.

Michael Nedelman/CNN
Michael Nedelman/CNN

7:32 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

Jefferson Parish pumped enough water to fill 242 million, 5-gallon bottles in an hour

Jefferson Parish President Michael Yenni speaks at news conference on Thursday ahead of Tropical Storm Barry.
Jefferson Parish President Michael Yenni speaks at news conference on Thursday ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. WVUE-DT

Jefferson Parish President Michael Yenni said the parish pumped so much water that they could fill up an Olympic-sized swimming pool in two seconds.

Yenni said they could fill up 242 million, 5-gallon water bottles in an hour with the amount of water they pumped.

The pumps were running at 99.3% on Wednesday. 

7:05 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

How Louisiana is preparing for Tropical Storm Barry

Matt Harrington boards up a Vans shoe store near the French Quarter in New Orleans as Tropical Storm Barry approaches on July 11, 2019.
Matt Harrington boards up a Vans shoe store near the French Quarter in New Orleans as Tropical Storm Barry approaches on July 11, 2019.  SETH HERALD/AFP/Getty Images

The National Guard has been activated and buses have been staged in three Louisiana cities ahead of the tropical storm, the governor said.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said 180 school buses and 150 tour buses were staged in Kenner, Gonzales and Lafayette for evacuations.

The state has activated 3,000 members of the National Guard as result of the storm, he said.

Edwards has also requested a federal emergency declaration.

CNN's Jamiel Lynch contributed to this reporting.

6:37 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

Morgan City mayor worried rains will exceed city's ability to pump

Morgan City Mayor Frank “Boo” Grizzaffi said he's concerned the rain will overwhelm the city’s pump system.

The entire city's drainage system operates under a pump system. He said he’s been told to expect 15 to 20 inches of rain in Morgan City. 

“We can handle the first 5 inches, but after that, we can pump one inch per hour," the mayor told CNN. "If we get rain greater than that it will exceed our capacity to pump it out,”

Grizzaffi continued: “We’re buckled down. Three days ago, I wouldn’t get out of my recliner with the forecast."

He went on to say a "big rain" is coming to Morgan City.

“The doom and gloom has shifted," Grizzaffi said.

Here's a list of the city's floodgate closures:

6:19 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

The Mississippi River is not expected to overtop the levee, Louisiana governor says

The Mississippi River is seen in New Orleans as Tropical Storm Barry approaches on July 11, 2019.
The Mississippi River is seen in New Orleans as Tropical Storm Barry approaches on July 11, 2019. SETH HERALD/AFP/Getty Images

The Mississippi River is not expected to overtop the river levee based on current forecast models, Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said Thursday.

The governor said the National Weather Service and the Army Corps of Engineers informed his office about the river levee.

Why this matters: Barry will inundate Louisiana at a terrible time — when rivers like the Mississippi are already flooded. Unusually high river levels from severe flooding this year could lead to an unprecedented challenge when Barry makes landfall.

In New Orleans, the Mississippi River was more than 16 feet deep on Thursday. At this time of year, it should be more like 6 to 8 feet, said Jeffrey Graschel, a hydrologist with the National Weather Service's Lower Mississippi River Forecast Center.

6:01 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

A hurricane hunter plane flew through the storm today

An aircraft with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration flew through Tropical Storm Barry today.

A photo taken inside the aircraft shows a flight crew receiving a briefing before its mission.

One thing to note: Barry remains a 40-mph tropical storm, but it is expected to continue to intensify, with a landfall expected sometime on Saturday morning along the Louisiana coast, likely west of New Orleans.

5:37 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

Chef José Andrés' team is setting up kitchens in Lafayette and New Orleans

Renowned chef José Andrés' nonprofit announced Thursday that they were on the ground in Lafayette and New Orleans and setting up kitchens in response to Tropical Storm Barry.

His team at World Central Kitchen tweeted that it was preparing to respond to the storm.

About Andrés' team: They have served millions of free meals to needy Americans after natural disasters like Hurricane Maria and the California wildfires. The team also fed federal government workers who were furloughed or working without pay during the 35-day partial shutdown in January.

5:13 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

Hurricane warnings issued for Louisiana

The National Hurricane Center just issued hurricane warnings for the Louisiana coast from Intracoastal City to Grand Isle.

New Orleans is now under a tropical storm warning. 

Barry remains a 40-mph tropical storm, but is expected to continue to intensify, with a landfall expected sometime on Saturday morning along the Louisiana coast, likely west of New Orleans.

Here's a look at the latest predictions:

National Hurricane Center
National Hurricane Center

4:27 p.m. ET, July 11, 2019

Here's what the people on Louisiana's coast are saying about Tropical Storm Barry

Storm clouds move towards New Orleans, Louisiana from Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana on July 11,2019
Storm clouds move towards New Orleans, Louisiana from Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana on July 11,2019 SETH HERALD/AFP/Getty Images

Pamela Hughes has decided to ride out Tropical Storm Barry in her mother's trailer in Port Sulphur, Louisiana. That's in Plaquemines Parish, which is under a mandatory evacuation order.  

But Hughes said she knows the risk and is staying anyway, despite the trailer not being on high ground.

"I really don't think it's going to be too bad," she told CNN.  

Hughes said she's prepared with gas and food and water. And she's seen the Mississippi River near Port Sulphur, and the nearby bayou, and both looked low to her.  

So, she's not really that worried. If she feels it'll be bad, she'll try and leave.  

Although she admits she doesn't have a back-up plan if the weather gets bad, she doesn't think she will go to a shelter.

Even though she's staying put, Hughes did evacuate her mother. She said her mother just got out of the hospital and has breast cancer.

Evacuating her meant she'd be nearer a hospital in case she needs medical treatment.

Some people in storms stay behind to protect their property or their pets. For Kristopher Williams, it's his truck.

He hasn't been able to get a new transmission for it.

"Everything I own is in it," he told CNN. "I'm not an ignorant person. I know the dangers. I also know how to get out if just about any bind I encounter."

Williams said he's going to ride out the storm in a hotel — for its owner — in Port Fourchon, Louisiana. The town is located on a barrier island in Lafourche Parish. 

Officials there expect to issue a mandatory evacuation order tomorrow morning for everything south of the Leon Theriot Flood Gate. That includes Port Fourchon.