Ida triggers massive flooding across Northeast

By Melissa Mahtani, Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner, Joshua Berlinger, Amy Woodyatt, Aditi Sangal, Adam Renton and Ed Upright, CNN

Updated 0401 GMT (1201 HKT) September 3, 2021
15 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
2:13 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

People are stuck at the US Open, and authorities are trying to get them home

From CNN's Mark Moraless

Rain enters the court through the outer openings of the roof causing a delay during the match between South Africa's Kevin Anderson and Argentina's Diego Schwartzman at the 2021 US Open on September 1 in New York.
Rain enters the court through the outer openings of the roof causing a delay during the match between South Africa's Kevin Anderson and Argentina's Diego Schwartzman at the 2021 US Open on September 1 in New York. (Al Bello/Getty Images)

The United States Tennis Association is working with New York authorities to identify routes to get fans home from the US Open, according to spokesperson Chris Widmaier.

The USTA is sending vehicles out to look for routes away from the venue at Flushing Meadows, Queens, according to Widmaier. 

“Our goal is to get people out safely,” he said.

Limited train services are running from stations near the venue, Widmaier said.

The US Open, tennis' final major tournament of the year, is scheduled to run until September 12.

2:04 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

1 person has died in the flooding in Passaic, New Jersey, says mayor

From CNN's Alta Spells

At least one person was killed in the flash flooding that inundated the New Jersey city of Passaic, Mayor Hector Lora said.

Lora told CNN's Don Lemon the body of an elderly man in his seventies was retrieved from floodwaters. The vehicle the man was riding in was overtaken by water and firefighters were swept under it, making it nearly impossible for them to reach the man. 

Firefighters were able to rescue two other individuals from the vehicle, according to the mayor.  

1:58 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

It will likely stop raining in New York City as the rainfall moves northeast

From CNN Meteorologist Brandon Miller

The band of extremely heavy rain that dumped record rainfall and brought flash floods to New Jersey and New York City is currently stretching from eastern Long Island into eastern Connecticut. One-hour rainfall totals of 2 to 3 inches are being indicated on radar in this area.

The rain in New York City appears to be ending.

Over the next several hours, this band will move into Rhode Island and Massachusetts, bringing potential dangerous flooding to other cities, like Providence and Boston.

1:52 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

How much water fell in New York City? Here's an estimate

From CNN Meteorologist Brandon Miller

Between 7 p.m. and midnight Eastern time, 6.8 inches (173 millimeters) of rain fell over Central Park.

Assuming that amount of rain fell equally over the 302 square miles (782 square kilometers) that make up all five boroughs of New York City — which may not actually be the case — then it would mean a whopping 35 billion gallons (132 billion liters) of water fell on the city between 7 p.m. and midnight.

Whatever the actual amount is, there is so much rain that the National Weather Service's New York City office is warning residents to stay off the streets.

1:50 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

All New Jersey Transit rail service is suspended due to extreme weather

From CNN’s Keith Allen

Flood waters can be seen in New York's Penn Station Wednesday, September 1 during the record-breaking rainfall due to remnants of Hurricane Ida hitting Northern New Jersey and New York City.
Flood waters can be seen in New York's Penn Station Wednesday, September 1 during the record-breaking rainfall due to remnants of Hurricane Ida hitting Northern New Jersey and New York City. (Rainmaker Photos/MediaPunch /IPX)

All New Jersey Transit rail service, with the exception of the Atlantic City Rail Line, has been suspended due to the extreme weather conditions caused by the remnants of Ida, the transit service posted on their official website.

All light rail and buses “are subject to suspensions, detours and delays,” due to the heavy rains and flooding that lashed the area Wednesday night, NJ Transit said.

1:34 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

1 person was killed in a partial building wall collapse in Queens

From CNN's Liam Reilly

One person died when the side wall of a building in Queens partially collapsed, according to the New York Fire Department.

The FDNY said it responded to reports of a water leak and removed one individual who was transported to Queens general hospital. A second patient was pronounced dead on scene. 

The FDNY could not comment directly on what caused the partial collapse.

1:47 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

People are being evacuated from New York City subway stations

From CNN’s Mark Morales

A firefighter directs people stranded at a subway entrance during flash flooding in New York on September 1.
A firefighter directs people stranded at a subway entrance during flash flooding in New York on September 1. (Anthony Behar/Sipa/AP Images)

First responders continue to safely evacuate people from the New York City subway system after “a historic and challenging night for the region, our customers and transit workers,” the acting chair and CEO of the Metropolitan Transit Authority, Janno Lieber, said in a statement.

It’s unclear how many trains still need to be evacuated.

Janno said the torrential rains have caused massive amounts of water to enter subways.

“New Yorkers should not attempt to travel until further notice,” Janno said. “We will be deploying maximum pump capacity and surging workers into the system when it's safe so that as this epic storm abates service can be restored as soon as possible." 

There is very limited subway and bus service at this time.

Commuter trains have also been affected. Metro-North Railroad completely suspended all train service on all lines for safety reasons and Long Island Rail Road service shut down after trains reached their final destinations, according to the MTA.

1:11 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

New York City issues travel ban for all non-emergency vehicles due to severe weather

From CNN's Paul Murphy

All non-emergency vehicles are banned from New York City's streets until 5 a.m. Eastern Time due to severe weather that's caused widespread flooding across the city, city authorities said on Twitter.

1:38 a.m. ET, September 2, 2021

No reports of significant or critical injuries at this time in New York City

From CNN's Mark Morales

People stand inside a subway station as water runs past their feet during flash flooding caused by storm Ida in New York, Wednesday night, September 1.
People stand inside a subway station as water runs past their feet during flash flooding caused by storm Ida in New York, Wednesday night, September 1. (Anthony Behar/Sipa/AP Images)

There are no reports of significant or critical injuries at this time in New York City due to the massive storm that has hit the city, according to the New York City Fire Department (FDNY).

The FDNY doesn’t yet have total numbers on how many people have been rescued but units have been deployed throughout the city. They have been removing people from flooded roadways and from subways in Manhattan.