July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news

By Travis Caldwell, Kelly McCleary, Aditi Sangal, Adrienne Vogt, Maureen Chowdhury, Elise Hammond and Melissa Macaya, CNN

Updated 0115 GMT (0915 HKT) July 6, 2022
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3:46 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

13-year-old had active shooter training and "hit the ground sobbing," relative says

From CNN's Jason Hanna, Adrienne Broaddus, Eric Levenson and Susannah Cullinane

Steve Tilken told CNN he sheltered in a store basement with his wife, her two grandchildren and dozens of others as police scoured the area for the gunman during Monday's shooting.

The Highland Park resident told CNN he initially thought someone was letting off a series of fireworks, but his wife's 13 year-old granddaughter had undergone active shooter training at school and "all of a sudden hit the ground sobbing." She also brought her brother to the ground, Tilken said.

"My wife just stood there -- was standing for like a second or two -- and then she realized what was going and so she dove down to protect their bodies with her body and I stood for another like couple of seconds in disbelief because I didn't see the carnage that was happening aback of me. And I threw my body on top of theirs," he said.

Tilken said they ran into the nearby store when he realized they were unprotected and in the line of fire.

"We were just sitting ducks right there and one bullet could pass through all of our bodies," he said.

Around 20 people were sheltering in different areas of the basement, including two women who appeared to have minor injuries from bullet grazes, Tilken said.

"My wife's granddaughter, she was shaken but in the basement, she, you know, tapped into some inner resources and was trying to be helpful to people with young kids and helping keeping the kids entertained and actually helping the two woman that had some of the minor wounds," Tilken said.

He said he went out of the store at one stage to try to see what was happening and saw a body "in a pool of blood," about eight feet from where he was standing.

"I realized ... it's just your random luck that I wasn't shot."

Police carrying assault weapons later entered the basement looking for the shooter, Tilken said, and then brought a doctor to assess those with injuries.

Read more about what witnesses encountered here:

3:02 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

Sounds of gunfire were originally thought to be fireworks, some bystanders said

From CNN's Helen Regan and Adrienne Broaddus

A day of national celebration turned to tragedy Monday when a gunman killed six people and injured dozens of others at a July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois -- leaving the nation grieving yet another mass shooting.

Bystanders initially thought the sound of gunfire that pierced the sunny parade just after 10 a.m. CT along the town's Central Avenue, about 25 miles north of Chicago, was fireworks, until hundreds of attendees started to flee in terror -- abandoning strollers, chairs and American-flag paraphernalia strewn on the streets.

Eyewitnesses described grabbing their children and families and running for their lives, some hiding behind dumpsters or in nearby stores for safety amid the chaos. One parade-goer described seeing a girl shot and killed, another saw a man shot in the ear with blood all over his face.

"It looked like a battle zone, and it's disgusting. It's really disgusting," Zoe Pawelczak, who attended the Independence Day parade with her father, said.

Read more about what happened at the parade here:

2:45 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

Victims transported to an area hospital ranged in age from 8 to 85, doctor says

From CNN's Chuck Johnston, Brynn Gingras and Joe Sutton

Six people were killed Monday after a gunman opened fire at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, authorities said.

Five of those who were killed died at the scene, all of whom were adults, said Lake County Coroner Jennifer Banek. Another person died after they were transported to a local hospital, she said. Authorities are working to notify the victims' families and have not publicly identified those who were killed.

A total of 26 patients were received at Highland Park Hospital, according to Dr. Brigham Temple, medical director of NorthShore University Health System. Of those tended to at that location, 25 sustained gunshot wounds, Temple said. Ten of those treated arrived by ambulance, he said, and 19 of the 25 gunshot victims have been discharged.

The patients there ranged in age from 8 years old to 85 years old, according to Temple, and four or five of the patients were children.

Five others were transported to Evanston Hospital, according to spokesperson Jim Anthony with the NorthShore University Health System.

8:13 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

Bidens "shocked" by Highland Park shooting as White House marks July Fourth

From CNN's Betsy Klein, Donald Judd and Maegan Vazquez

US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden take a moment of silence for the victims of the Highland Park shooting during a Fourth of July BBQ at the White House in Washington, DC, on Monday.
US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden take a moment of silence for the victims of the Highland Park shooting during a Fourth of July BBQ at the White House in Washington, DC, on Monday. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

President Joe Biden began Independence Day by sharing a message that looked to the country's future, but quickly had to respond to another mass shooting in the United States.

"Jill and I are shocked by the senseless gun violence that has yet again brought grief to an American community on this Independence Day," the President said in a statement Monday after at least six people were killed in a shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, during a July Fourth parade.

Biden noted that he had "surged Federal law enforcement to assist in the urgent search for the shooter," and pointed to the gun safety legislation he recently signed into law.

"But there is much more work to do, and I'm not going to give up fighting the epidemic of gun violence," Biden added.

Read more about Biden's reaction here.

6:08 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

Here's what we know about the suspect taken into custody in connection with the shooting

(Highland Park Police Department)
(Highland Park Police Department)

Robert E. Crimo III, identified by police as the person suspected of shooting and killing six people and wounding dozens of others Monday morning at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, has been arrested, authorities said Monday evening.

Police believe the suspected gunman opened fire shortly after 10 a.m. CT from the rooftop of a business near the parade route. The gun was a "high-powered rifle" and the attack appeared to be "random" and "intentional," said Christopher Covelli, spokesperson for the Lake County Major Crime Task Force.

Here's what we know about the suspected gunman:

  • Suspect was apprehended hours after shooting: Federal, state and local authorities identified Crimo on Monday after the shooting and asked for the public's help in locating him, saying he was believed to be driving a 2010 silver Honda Fit. Crimo was spotted by a North Chicago officer who attempted to initiate a traffic stop, and he then fled and led officers on a brief pursuit before being stopped in Lake Forest, Illinois, authorities said late Monday. He was taken into custody without incident, police said. In video taken by a bystander, police can be heard giving commands for Crimo to get out of the vehicle. Police with guns drawn are seen as Crimo exits the vehicle with his hands in the air.
  • Suspect posted violent imagery online: The suspected gunman posted online music videos he apparently made that featured ominous sounding lyrics and animated scenes of gun violence. One video shows a cartoon animation of a stick-figure shooter -- resembling Crimo’s appearance -- in tactical gear carrying out an attack with a rifle. In another video, a similar stick-figure cartoon character resembling Crimo is depicted lying face down on the floor in a pool of his own blood surrounded by police officers with their guns drawn. The Facebook and Twitter accounts believed to belong to Crimo were taken down after he was named by authorities as a person of interest.
  • Digital evidence helped investigators determine suspect: Law enforcement officials have “processed a significant amount of digital evidence today which helped lead investigators” toward identifying Crimo as a suspect, Covelli said late Monday. Police labeled Crimo "a person of interest" during their manhunt after the shooting, which Covelli said, “calling somebody a suspect or person of interest, it’s really synonymous … This individual is believed to have been responsible for what happened and the investigation will continue. Charges have not been approved yet at this time -- and we are a long way from that." Highland Park Police identified the suspect as being 22 years old, but a later FBI bulletin reported he was 21. CNN has reached out to authorities for more information.
  • Suspect’s uncle saw no warning signs, he says: An uncle of the suspect told CNN he saw no warning signs that would prompt him to believe his nephew would have been involved in such a tragedy. “I’m heartbroken. I’m so heartbroken,” Paul A. Crimo said, expressing remorse for the families of the victims and adding he spoke at length to law enforcement Monday about his nephew. The suspect lives in an apartment behind the house owned by his father, Paul said, adding that he last saw his nephew Sunday evening looking at his computer and not acting out of the ordinary.

2:12 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

Analysis: July 4 parade slaughter again shows nowhere is safe from America's mass killing contagion

Analysis from CNN's Stephen Collinson

A man carries his belongings after a mass shooting at the Highland Park Fourth of July parade in downtown Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.
A man carries his belongings after a mass shooting at the Highland Park Fourth of July parade in downtown Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday. (Nam Y. Huh/AP)

America's latest mass shooting turned a cherished July Fourth parade from a scene of patriotic joy into one of fear and death.

The rapid bursts of a high-powered rifle brought the chilling reality that no one can be sure they are safe, anywhere, to one of the nation's most unifying gatherings.

In that instant, Highland Park joined Uvalde, Columbine, Newtown and Parkland and a long list of cities and towns known across the country for the massacre of innocents in a gun violence contagion that makes the United States an outlier in developed societies.

Television pictures Monday of police vehicles in Highland Park rushing to help beneath a billowing American flag added an ironic, new dimension to this latest horror. It took place as Americans gathered to celebrate the 246th anniversary of the freedoms inherent in American independence.

Yet what unfolded encapsulated the quintessentially American cycle of death by firearms. When a gunman killed three people in a mall shooting in Copenhagen, Denmark, over the weekend, it was shocking because it was unusual. But while Monday's shooting outside Chicago was unexpected, another mass shooting in the US was hardly a surprise.

Read the full analysis here:

12:57 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

Gun Violence Archive: Over the past 186 days, there have been more than 300 mass shootings in the US

From CNN's Travis Caldwell

The shooting deaths of six people at a parade in Illinois was one of several mass shootings over the Fourth of July holiday weekend in the US, according to data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive, a nonprofit that tracks gun violence incidents across the country.

As of July 5, there have been at least 311 mass shootings since the beginning of the year, according to the archive. July 5 is the 186th day of 2022.

The Gun Violence Archive, like CNN, defines a mass shooting as one in which at least four people are shot, excluding the shooter.

Last year was the worst year on record since the Gun Violence Archive began tracking mass shootings in 2014. There were a total of 692 mass shootings in the US in 2021, the nonprofit says.

2:19 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

Here are the latest developments in the Illinois Fourth of July parade shooting

An aerial photo shows law enforcement officers investigating the scene at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.
An aerial photo shows law enforcement officers investigating the scene at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday. (Tannen Maury/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

At least six people were killed in a mass shooting at a July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois, located about 25 miles north of Chicago.

A suspect, identified by police as Robert E. Crimo III, has been arrested after being spotted driving following the shooting and led police on a brief chase, authorities said.

Here are the latest developments:

  • Video shows officers taking suspect into custody: Ryan Lerman, a delivery driver, told CNN he had been following the news and noticed right away a Honda Fit that Crimo was suspected of driving, capturing the moments of his arrest on video. “He was there for a minute and then like seven cop cars showed up,” Lerman said. In the video, police can be heard giving commands for Crimo to get out of the vehicle. Police with guns drawn are seen as Crimo exits the vehicle with his hands in the air.
  • Digital evidence helped investigators determine suspect: When authorities discussed the apprehension of Crimo during an evening news conference, Lake County Major Crime Task Force spokesperson Christopher Covelli said law enforcement officials have “processed a significant amount of digital evidence today which helped lead investigators” toward identifying Crimo has a suspect. Earlier, as law enforcement searched for Crimo, police labeled him "a person of interest," which Covelli said, “calling somebody a suspect or person of interest, it’s really synonymous … This individual is believed to have been responsible for what happened and the investigation will continue. Charges have not been approved yet at this time -- and we are a long way from that."
  • People wounded range in age from 8 to 85, doctor says: A total of 26 patients were received at Highland Park Hospital, 25 of whom sustained gunshot wounds, according to Dr. Brigham Temple, medical director of NorthShore University Health System. The patients range in age from 8 to 85 years old, according to Temple, and 19 of the 25 gunshot victims were treated and have been discharged. Four or five of the patients were children, Temple said.
  • Officials pledge support for community: Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker and Sen. Tammy Duckworth said Monday they will ensure federal and state support goes to those affected by the shooting. "It is devastating that a celebration of America was ripped apart by our uniquely American plague," Pritzker said. "A day dedicated to freedom has put into stark relief the one freedom we, as a nation, refused to uphold. The freedom of our fellow citizens to live without the daily fear of gun violence." Duckworth said she’s been in touch with President Joe Biden and Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas, who she said have both pledged to send resources that are needed.
2:36 a.m. ET, July 5, 2022

6 people were killed in a mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Illinois. Here's what we know

First responders work the scene of a shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.
First responders work the scene of a shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday. (Jim Vondruska/Getty Images)

At least six people were killed and more than 20 were wounded in a shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois. It marks at least the 308th mass shooting in the US this year, according to data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive, a nonprofit tracking such incidents.

A suspect, identified by police as Robert E. Crimo III, has been arrested after a manhunt and brief chase from police ended without further incident, authorities said.

Here's what we know so far about the shooting:

  • Where it happened: Highland Park, Illinois, is located about 25 miles north of downtown Chicago. Police say the shooting started about 20 minutes from the start of the parade.
  • The shooting: Sgt. Christopher Covelli, from the Lake County Major Crime Task Force, said police have recovered a "high-powered rifle" on the rooftop of a business. Police say they believe the shooter was on the rooftop when he opened fire. Covelli said the suspect likely accessed the roof from a ladder in an alley. Officials have not disclosed where the building is specifically. A firearm that was recovered in Highland Park after the shooting is being urgently traced to figure out who purchased the weapon and where it came from, according to Kim Nerheim, spokesperson with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
  • The victims: Five of the people that were killed during the shooting died at the scene, Jennifer Banek, the Lake County coroner, said. All of those people were adults, she said. Another person died after they were transported to a local hospital, she added. Covelli said that it appeared that spectators and parade participants were targeted. Dr. Brigham Temple, of the NorthShore University Health System, said 26 people in total were brought to the hospital and 25 had gunshot injuries. At least 19 people were treated and discharged home. The victims age ranged from 8 to 85 years old, Temple added.
  • Witnesses: Several people who attended the parade told CNN they thought the gunshots were fireworks at first. Zoe Pawelczak said when she realized something was wrong, she grabbed her dad and started running. Others described the scene as chaotic as people ran away and took shelter.
  • The suspected shooter: The gunman was not apprehended at the scene, and authorities later named Robert E. Crimo III as a person of interest. Crimo was spotted in his vehicle by a North Chicago officer, then fled and led officers on a brief pursuit before being stopped. He was taken into custody without incident and will be taken to the Highland Park Police Department. Earlier, Highland Park Police identified the suspect as being 22 years old, but a later FBI bulletin reported he was 21. CNN has reached out to authorities for more information.