March on Washington rallies after Jacob Blake shooting

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1:22 p.m. ET, August 28, 2020

MLK's granddaughter says her generation "will fulfill my grandfather's dream"

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

Yolanda Renee King, granddaughter of Martin Luther King, Jr., directly addressed fellow young people during the commemoration of the March on Washington.

“We have mastered the selfie and TikToks. Now we must master ourselves,” she said. “Less than a year before he was assassinated, my grandfather predicted this very moment. He said that we were moving into a new phase of the struggle. The first phase was the civil rights and the new phase is genuine equality.”  

“Genuine equality is why we are here today and why people are coming together all across the world, from New Zealand to New Jersey,” she added.

Yolanda vowed to her late grandfather that the civil rights movement of the 1960s would not be forgotten and it will inform current protests.

“We stand and march for love and we will fulfill my grandfather's dream,” she said. 

Yolanda said her generation will put an end to gun violence, police brutality, systemic racism, poverty and climate change.

“My generation has already taken to the streets peacefully and with masks and socially distanced to protest racism. And I want to ask the young people here to join me in pledging that we have only just begun to fight and that we will be the generation that moves from ‘me’ to ‘we’,” she said. 

Watch:

1:07 p.m. ET, August 28, 2020

NBA will resume season Saturday

From CNN's Dan Kamal

The Black Lives Matter logo is seen on an empty court as all NBA playoff games were postponed today during the 2020 NBA Playoffs at The Field House at ESPN Wide World Of Sports Complex on August 27 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. 
The Black Lives Matter logo is seen on an empty court as all NBA playoff games were postponed today during the 2020 NBA Playoffs at The Field House at ESPN Wide World Of Sports Complex on August 27 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida.  Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

The NBA and the players association say games will resume on Saturday, while no playoff games will be played Friday.

In a statement released Friday, the league and players union jointly announced a commitment to establish a social justice coalition and election/voting initiatives.

A total of nine games have been postponed since Wednesday, when the Milwaukee Bucks became the first team opting not to play in response to the shooting of Jacob Blake by a police officer in Wisconsin Sunday.

Michele Roberts, director of the National Basketball Players Association, and NBA Commissioner Adam Silver released a joint statement about today's developments.

Read the full joint statement:

“We had a candid, impassioned and productive conversation yesterday between NBA players, coaches and team governors regarding next steps to further our collective efforts and actions in support of social justice and racial equality. Among others, the attendees included player and team representatives of all 13 teams in Orlando. All parties agreed to resume NBA playoff games on Saturday, Aug. 29 with the understanding that the league together with the players will work to enact the following commitments:
The NBA and its players have agreed to immediately establish a social justice coalition, with representatives from players, coaches and governors, that will be focused on a broad range of issues, including increasing access to voting, promoting civic engagement, and advocating for meaningful police and criminal justice reform.
In every city where the league franchise owns and controls the arena property, team governors will continue to work with local elections officials to convert the facility into a voting location for the 2020 general election to allow for a safe in-person voting option for communities vulnerable to COVID. If a deadline has passed, team governors will work with local elections officials to find another election-related use for the facility, including but not limited to voter registration and ballot receiving boards.
The league will work with the players and our network partners to create and include advertising spots in each NBA playoff game dedicated to promoting greater civic engagement in national and local elections and raising awareness around voter access and opportunity.
These commitments follow months of close collaboration around designing a safe and healthy environment to restart the NBA season, providing a platform to promote social justice, as well as creating an NBA Foundation focused on economic empowerment in the Black community.
We look forward to the resumption of the playoffs and continuing to work together – in Orlando and in all NBA team markets – to push for meaningful and sustainable change.”

12:56 p.m. ET, August 28, 2020

Rep. Pressley addresses March on Washington: "We will meet the moment"

From CNN's Harmeet Kaur and Jason Hanna

Speakers outside the Lincoln Memorial, in an event organized by the Rev. Al Sharpton and joined by Martin Luther King Jr.'s son, are expected to include families of Black people slain or severely injured in police encounters, including George Floyd and Jacob Blake.

Rep. Ayanna Pressley, a Democrat from Massachusetts, spoke to crowds Friday morning.

"We will meet the moment. We will work toward healing (and) justice ... like our lives depend on it, because they do," she said. "Let me make it plain: Black lives matter!" Pressley said.

Friday's march —which will head to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in the afternoon —comes exactly 57 years since crowds packed the National Mall to demand civil rights and economic opportunity in 1963.

The event, dubbed the "Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks," brings an end a tumultuous week, one that saw Blake shot by police in Wisconsin.

Watch part of Rep. Ayanna Pressley's address:

12:15 p.m. ET, August 28, 2020

Trump takes credit for "success" in Kenosha

From CNN's Betsy Klein

In a tweet Friday, President Trump took credit for what he described as "success" in Kenosha, Wisconsin, furthering his law and order message.

Trump still has yet to address the shooting of Jacob Blake, a 29-year-old Black father, who was shot by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Read the President's tweet:

 

12:06 p.m. ET, August 28, 2020

Martin Luther King III describes what today's march would mean to his father 

Martin Luther King III, second from left, prepares for a television interview at the March on Washington on August 28.
Martin Luther King III, second from left, prepares for a television interview at the March on Washington on August 28. Alex Brandon/AP

CNN’s Suzanne Malveaux is reporting from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, where activists are gathered to commemorate the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington.

She told CNN's Kate Bolduan that she spoke to Martin Luther King III about what his father, Martin Luther King Jr., would think about today’s march.

“He says his father would be proud of the people who have come here, who are fighting for justice, but he would also be very sad that we're still at this place where our society is so broken," she said.

Malveaux said she also asked Luther King III what keeps him up at night.

"He said it's the fact that his 12-year-old daughter has already asked him the question, 'why do we still have to do this? I thought granddaddy had put this to bed, put this to rest,' and he says it's because we have to. We have to continue this fight."

Watch more:

12:00 p.m. ET, August 28, 2020

What it's like at today's March on Washington

Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images
Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Activists have gathered at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, today, the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington. Speakers are addressing the crowd now.

CNN's Suzanne Malveaux, who's at the event, said it's an emotional day for many of the protesters.

“It's been such an emotionally charged pre-program before the official program,” Malveaux reported. “People who have been crying, people who have expressed rage, but mostly just real frustration here. Some very passionate and personal stories about people who have lost their loved ones."

Today's event is dubbed the "Get Your Knee Off Our Necks" Commitment March, a reference to the police killing of George Floyd, who died after held down with police officer's knee as he protested that he couldn't breathe. 

The Rev. Al Sharpton's National Action Network began planning the march in partnership with the NAACP and others after he announced the event during Floyd's funeral in June. But it comes during a week that has seen intensified called for social justice and police reform following the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Wisconsin.

Blake, a 29-year-old Black father, was shot by police on Sunday. His family says he is now paralyzed from the waist down.

Today's march comes during the coronavirus pandemic. Here's a look at the socially distanced protest:

Julio Cortez/AP
Julio Cortez/AP

Paul Morigi/Getty Images
Paul Morigi/Getty Images

11:34 a.m. ET, August 28, 2020

Kenosha shooting suspect's hearing pushed back to next month

From CNN's Melissa Alonso

Kyle Rittenhouse, left, with backwards cap, walks along Sheridan Road in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Tuesday, August 25, with another armed civilian.
Kyle Rittenhouse, left, with backwards cap, walks along Sheridan Road in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Tuesday, August 25, with another armed civilian. Adam Rogan/The Journal Times/AP

The suspect in the Kenosha, Wisconsin, fatal shooting will stay in Lake County, Illinois, for a month and a hearing on the status of his extradition has been set for Sept. 25, according to the Illinois judge presiding over matters of his extradition. 

Kyle Rittenhouse, 17, did not appear at his video extradition hearing, which lasted only a few minutes. 

Rittenhouse is not waiving extradition proceedings, according to a court appointed attorney in Illinois. 

The public defender said the delay would allow Rittenhouse to meet with a private attorney and for that attorney to file an appearance with the court. 

Rittenhouse faces multiple charges for the shooting incident during a night of unrest in Kenosha earlier this week that left two people dead and a third person seriously injured, authorities have said. 

Correction: A previous version of this post said Rittenhouse would be extradited on Sept. 25. His hearing will be on Sept. 25.

11:18 a.m. ET, August 28, 2020

What we know so far about the shooting of Jacob Blake and the protests that followed

Jacob Blake, left, is seen with his sons.
Jacob Blake, left, is seen with his sons. From Ben Crump/Twitter

Jacob Blake, a 29-year-old Black father, was shot by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Sunday. The shooting sparked protests in Wisconsin and across the country.

If you need to read in, here's what we know about the shooting, the aftermath and the ongoing protests for social justice:

  • What happened: Kenosha officers were called to a domestic incident about 5:11 p.m. Sunday, police said. Wisconsin state investigators said that when police arrived, they used a taser to try to stop Blake, before a single officer fired his weapon seven times and injured him. The officers rendered aid before Blake was flown to the Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee, police said.
  • Blake's condition: Blake underwent surgery and his family says he is now paralyzed from the waist down. His family said he is handcuffed to his hospital bed.
  • An investigation: An probe into the shooting was quickly turned over to the Wisconsin Department of Justice and a federal civil rights investigation was launched. Officials identified Officer Rusten Sheskey as the person who shot Blake when he tried to enter his vehicle. The officer, who has been employed by Kenosha police for seven years, was placed on administrative leave.
  • A deadly shooting at the protest: Protesters have rallied in Kenosha nightly since the shooting. At Tuesday's protest, two people were killed and a third was seriously wounded in the a shooting. Police have named 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse as a suspect in the shooting and he now faces homicide charges as well as a felony charge for attempted homicide.
  • Pro sports boycotts: What began as the Milwaukee Bucks' decision to boycott their playoff game following Blake's shooting cascaded into a wave of similar protests across the American sports scene by Wednesday night. Yesterday, several professional sports teams announced they would skip practice and instead hold discussions on social justice.

10:15 a.m. ET, August 28, 2020

Jacob Blake's father will march in Washington today

From CNN's Melissa Alonso

CNN
CNN

Jacob Blake's father, Jacob Blake Sr., is in Washington for the anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s march there. 

Blake shared his family's history in civil rights with CNN's Alisyn Camerota 

"My father was there for the first march in Washington. He went through Selma to Montgomery. He went across the Edmund Pettus. He marched for open housing in Evanston, Illinois. He built two churches, before he got his last assignment at Ebenezer AME church in Evanston, Illinois. They built a building, named after the Robinsons, and my father. His name was on a building there on Emerson street in Evanston. His name is on another building at Maple and Emerson that he built, the only one of its kind in Illinois. So yes, I'd say my family has a history of civil rights," Blake said.

Thousands are expected to gather in Washington, DC, today for the 57th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s iconic “I Have a Dream” speech.