Mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio

By Ivana Kottasová and Emanuella Grinberg, CNN

Updated 9:12 a.m. ET, August 5, 2019
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6:15 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

What we know about the Dayton shooting

Shoes are piled behind the Ned Peppers bar in Dayton, Ohio, after the shooting that took place there early Sunday.
Shoes are piled behind the Ned Peppers bar in Dayton, Ohio, after the shooting that took place there early Sunday. MEGAN JELINGER/AFP/Getty Images

A second mass shooting in the United States in 13 hours occurred early Sunday in the busy Dayton, Ohio, nightlife area known as the Oregon District.

Nine people are dead and 26 wounded. The shooter is also dead. Police identified him as 24-year old Connor Betts. 

FBI and local law enforcement authorities have served a search warrant at the shooter’s family home in Bellbrook, Ohio, southeast of Dayton.

The victims:

  • The deceased victims ranged in age from 22 to 57. Authorities said the shooter's sister, 22-year-old Megan K. Betts, was among those killed.
  • Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said 27 people were treated for injuries and 15 have been discharged from area medical centers.

Police response:

  • Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said six officers responded to the shooting.
  • Biehl said the officers engaged the shooter and within 20 seconds of hearing gunfire, police officers engaged with the suspect. Biehl said the threat was neutralized within 30 seconds of the suspect beginning to fire shots. 

The weapon:

  • Mayor Whaley said the shooter was wearing body armor and used a “.223 (caliber) high-capacity” gun and had additional magazines with him.
  • Biehl said the shooter's gun had a double drum magazine with a capacity of 100 rounds. He said the suspect fired "dozens" of shots.

Gun was ordered online

  • The weapon used in the shooting was ordered online from Texas, and transferred to the suspect at a local firearms dealer near Dayton, according to Chief Biehl.
  • There was nothing in the suspect's history that would have precluded his purchase of the weapon, according to Biehl.

Motive not known

  •  "There is far too much information to review," Biehl said, before a motive can be determined.
5:01 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

Trump says "perhaps more has to be done" on guns 

Trump gives a statement about the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton before boarding his plane to Washington at Morristown Airport.
Trump gives a statement about the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton before boarding his plane to Washington at Morristown Airport. NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

Asked what he was going to do to address gun violence, President Trump told reporters Sunday that “a lot of things are in the works” and claimed his administration has done “much more than most administrations.”

Trump oversaw a ban on so-called bump stocks but has not pursued large-scale gun control efforts. His predecessor, Barack Obama, took dozens of executive actions on gun control, including on background checks and mental health.

Trump touted his administration’s work on the issue, saying, “We’ve done actually a lot but perhaps more has to be done.”

Trump also said this is a “mental illness” problem.

Trump ignored other questions on the topic, including one on white nationalism.

4:56 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

Police: Shooter's gun had 100-round drum magazine

Dayton Police Department
Dayton Police Department

Dayton police showed a photo and provided detail on the gun the suspect used in the attack.

Police Chief Richard Biehl told the media the weapon has a "double drum magazine" which has a capacity of up to 100 rounds.

Biehl said the gun was purchased legally. He said the gun was ordered online from Texas, then transferred to the suspect at a local firearms dealer in Ohio.

Biehl added that police weren't aware of anything "in this individual's history or record that would have precluded him from purchasing that weapon."

Asked by reporters about the legality of the large magazine, Biehl said there is "no indication that that is illegal at this time."

Biehl said the suspect fired "dozens" of shots during the shooting.

4:51 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

Dayton police chief says officers shot suspect before he had a chance to enter bar

Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl
Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl

Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl provided media with an update Sunday afternoon on the law enforcement investigation into the shooting.

Biehl said that at 1:05 a.m. Sunday, officers patrolling heard gunfire and responded to a shooting incident in the Oregon district.

Biehl said within 20 seconds of hearing gunfire, police officers engaged with the suspect. He said the threat was neutralized within 30 seconds of the suspect beginning to fire shots. 

Biehl said six officers were involved in engaging the shooter -- five officers and one sergeant. He said per standard department protocol, those officers will be placed on administrative leave

Biehl said the suspect, Connor Betts, had a minimal history with law enforcement. He had traffic violations for speeding, failure to control and failure to yield.

Biehl released a 911 radio call and multiple surveillance videos from the time of the incident. In one video, Biehl said, an officer can be seen shooting the suspect as he tries to enter the Ned Peppers bar.

The police chief said stopping the suspect before entering the bar was "essential" and prevented further "catastrophic injury and loss of life."

4:36 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

Dayton mayor has heard from more than 70 mayors across the US

CNN's Chuck Johnston

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley said she's received an outpouring of support Sunday from all across the US. 

Whaley said she's heard from over 70 other mayors -- including Buddy Dyer, mayor of Orlando, where 49 people were killed at the Pulse nightclub in 2016. 

Whaley said she's also heard from Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto. That city suffered a mass shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in October 2018. 

Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio praised law enforcement's quick response to the shooting. Police killed the gunman less than a minute after he opened fire.

"This courage was extraordinary, and saved lives -- probably hundreds of lives," Portman said. 

"I'm impressed with how this community comes together and responds."

3:18 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

Suspected shooter's Dayton college says it's working with law enforcement

The college attended by shooting suspect Connor Betts says it's working with law enforcement to "provide any and all information we may have to assist them in the response to this horrific act."

Sinclair Community College in Dayton said in a statement that Betts was "previously enrolled" as a student but wasn't attending any classes this summer.

Here's the full statement from Dr. Steve Johnson, President of Sinclair Community College:

“Our hearts are broken for so many members of this wonderful community this weekend. A senseless tragedy occurred in our community and our thoughts are and will remain with the victims and their friends and families. We have learned that the person who is suspected of perpetrating this heinous crime was previously enrolled as a Sinclair student though was not actively enrolled this summer term. We are actively working with law enforcement to provide any and all information we may have to assist them in the response to this horrific act. We will respond in a timely manner to inquiries on this matter. As our community comes together in responding to this tragedy, each of us must play a part and we stand ready to do ours.” 

 

2:25 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

Law enforcement sources: Writings from Dayton gunman showed interest in killing people

From Evan Perez and Scott Glover

Authorities have found writings linked to Dayton, Ohio, shooting suspect Connor Betts that show he had an interest in killing people, two federal law enforcement sources told CNN. A preliminary assessment of the writings, found during the execution of a search warrant, did not indicate any racial or political motive, the sources said. 

At an afternoon press conference, police said they are looking for any indication of motives.

“We're always looking at what could have motivated such a horrific action as this, and like I said this morning, we're interviewing dozens of people and going through a lot of different electronic evidence, other evidence to try to determine that. We don't have that answer yet,” Lt. Col. Matt Carper, Dayton Deputy Chief of Police said. “But speculating at this point would be premature.”

 

2:07 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

These are the victims of the Dayton shooting

The City of Dayton has released the names of the nine deceased victims in the shooting early Sunday. Suspect Connor Betts' sister was identified as one of those killed.

Here are their names: 

  • Lois L. Oglesby, female, 27
  • Megan K. Betts, female, 22
  • Saeed Saleh, male, 38
  • Derrick R. Fudge, male, 57
  • Logan M. Turner, male, 30
  • Nicholas P. Cumer, male, 25
  • Thomas J. McNichols, male, 25
  • Beatrice N. Warren-Curtis, female, 36
  • Monica E. Brickhouse, female, 39

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine said at a Sunday afternoon press conference that "all the victims are from our own backyard."

DeWine added, “this is just an immense tragedy. No matter where the victims are from, they're victims. Our hearts go out to the families. This is a Miami Valley tragedy.”

1:44 p.m. ET, August 4, 2019

Dayton police: The shooter's sister is among the dead

Dayton Police Deputy Chief Matt Carper confirmed that Connor Betts is the shooter and that his sister Megan Betts, 22, was one of those killed.

Speaking at a press conference, Carper identified the nine slain victims, who ranged in age from 22 to 57. He said all families have been notified. 

Carper said all nine of the victims were found in the same location.