Coronavirus pandemic in the US

By Meg Wagner, Elise Hammond, Mike Hayes and Emma Reynolds, CNN

Updated 9:03 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020
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4:35 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

There are now at least 980,000 coronavirus cases in the US

A medical worker stands outside of a special coronavirus intake area at Maimonides Medical Center on April 27, in New York City.
A medical worker stands outside of a special coronavirus intake area at Maimonides Medical Center on April 27, in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

There are at least 980,008 cases of coronavirus in the US, and at least 55,637 people have died, according to Johns Hopkins University's tally of cases.

Johns Hopkins has reported 14,223 new cases and 756 reported deaths so far today.

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases.

 

4:30 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

Iowa officials ask Trump administration for immediate help for pork producers

From CNN’s Dave Alsup

 

Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds cheers as she watches President Donald Trump speaking during a campaign rally at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, on January 30.
Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds cheers as she watches President Donald Trump speaking during a campaign rally at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, on January 30. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, along with US Sens. Joni Ernst and Chuck Grassley, and other state officials sent a letter to Vice President Mike Pence and the coronavirus task force calling for immediate assistance for the state’s pork producers.

"Pork producers in Iowa and nationwide will go out of business, and the industry could further contract and consolidate, if farmers are not compensated for the animals that they have no choice but to euthanize," the letter states.

The officials are requesting the invocation of the Defense Security Act to keep pork producers “viable." The letter also asks for extra resources to be sent to assist in humane euthanasia for hogs, and for mental health assistance for pork producers. 

Iowa produces one-third of the nation’s pork supply and is home to one-fourth of the nation’s pork processing capacity. 

“Simply put, Iowa pork producers cannot operate if they can’t send their pigs to market,” the letter states. 

 

4:28 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

Illinois has processed over 227,000 coronavirus tests

From CNN's Chris Boyette

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker speaks during a press conference on April 3, in Chicago.
Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker speaks during a press conference on April 3, in Chicago.

Laboratories in Illinois have processed 12,676 coronavirus tests within the past 24 hours, for a total of 227,628, Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike said today.

According to Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker, the state is averaging over 10,000 tests per day. 

Ezike also announced 1,980 new cases of coronavirus in Illinois, including 50 additional deaths. This brings the total state count to 45,883 cases, including 1,983 deaths, according to Ezike.

4:15 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

US stocks finish higher

From CNN's Richard Davis

The "Fearless Girl" statue wears a face mask with American Flags outside the New York Stock Exchange at Wall Street on April 23, in New York City.
The "Fearless Girl" statue wears a face mask with American Flags outside the New York Stock Exchange at Wall Street on April 23, in New York City. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

US stocks closed higher on Monday, with the Dow recording its fourth straight day of gains. This hasn’t happened since early February.

Investors shrugged off another selloff in the oil market and focused on the busy earnings calendar ahead.

Here's where the markets closed: 

  • The Dow finished up 1.5%, or 359 points.
  • The S&P 500 closed up 1.5%.
  • The Nasdaq Composite closed 1.1% higher.

 Remember: As stocks settle after the trading day, levels might still change slightly.

4:17 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

Texas governor will allow stay-at-home order to expire on April 30 

From CNN’s Konstantin Toropin

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott appears at a press conference at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, on March 29.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott appears at a press conference at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, on March 29. Tom Fox/Pool/Getty Images

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced today that he will allow his stay-at-home order for Texas to expire on April 30. 

Abbott's new executive order, which supersedes local orders, allows businesses like retail stores, malls, restaurants and theaters to reopen May 1 but limits occupancy to 25%. The order will also allow libraries and museums to open.

The governor said he wants barbershops, salons, gyms and bars open "as soon as possible" and expects them to open no later than mid-May.

 

4:19 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

Ohio governor on reopening plans: It's "my decision"

CNN’s Rebekah Riess

Protesters gather at the Ohio Statehouse to protest the 'Stay at Home' order on April 20, in Columbus, Ohio.
Protesters gather at the Ohio Statehouse to protest the 'Stay at Home' order on April 20, in Columbus, Ohio. Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images

When talking about the reopening plans laid out for the state today, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said, "ultimately, the decision is my decision, and I take full responsibility for the decision.”

DeWine announced earlier today that Ohio will be reopening some health care services on May 1, saying all health procedures or operations that do not require an overnight stay in a hospital can move forward.

Manufacturing, distribution, and construction companies, as well as general offices will be allowed to open on May 4.

In a third step, consumer, retail and other services will be allowed to reopen on May 12, DeWine said.

 “With a decision like this, there is no easy decision – we have to balance. We will be criticized by those who think we shouldn't open up. We'll be criticized by those who think we didn't open up enough," he added.

When asked about other Republicans, who had called for him to open up everything immediately, DeWine said “these are a balance, and to throw the doors open on May 1 and say, get rid of the stay at home order, or get rid of the distancing, and get rid of everything, would be totally irresponsible.”

“I have an obligation as governor of the state to do two things right now – get people back to work and keep them safe,” DeWine said.
4:07 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

Boston won't reopen on May 4, mayor says

From CNN's Anna Sturla

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh listens to a question at a press conference on March 13, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts.
Boston Mayor Marty Walsh listens to a question at a press conference on March 13, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts. Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said May 4 is "too early” to reopen after the Massachusetts governor promised "clarity" on reopening the state on that date.

“I would have serious concerns if we start relaxing some of the measures we have taken in Boston and the Commonwealth on May 4, especially If it is done without a clear and thoughtful plan," Walsh said.  

Earlier today, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said that later this week he would “create clarity” on reopening the state on May 4.

Walsh said that the city is working with the state to determine which public health benchmarks need to be met to determine reopening. 

“We are building a framework for short-, medium- and long-term recovery," he said. 

“We cannot afford any mistakes and we can’t wait for the coronavirus to go away to take next steps," Walsh added. 

3:51 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

California is "weeks away, not months" from changes to stay-at-home order, governor says

From CNN's Cheri Mossburg

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference at the California Department of Public Health on February 27, in Sacramento, California.
California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference at the California Department of Public Health on February 27, in Sacramento, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom said the state is "just weeks away, not months away, from making meaningful changes to our stay-at-home order.”

He warned the public about the need to continue to abide by social distancing guidelines and chastised beachgoers in Ventura and Orange County for flocking to the coastlines on Saturday in particular.

“This virus doesn’t take the weekends off. This virus doesn’t go home. We have to manage and augment our behavior,” Newsom said. “The only thing that will set us back is people stopping practicing physical distancing.”

There were no citations issued, but some people were given warnings for defying stay-at-home orders. Newsom warned that more aggressive enforcement could come if the guidelines and procedures are flouted.

The governor reiterated that the state’s lifting of restrictions will be “driven by data that’s driven by our behavior.”

3:46 p.m. ET, April 27, 2020

Key West to reopen parks and beaches to local residents only

From CNN’s Rosa Flores and Sara Weisfeldt

Empty lounge chairs are seen on the deserted beach of Florida Keys on March 22.
Empty lounge chairs are seen on the deserted beach of Florida Keys on March 22. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Key West, Florida, will reopen parks, beaches and recreational facilities to local residents effective today, according to a letter from City Manager Greg Veliz posted on the city’s official Facebook page.

“Although we are currently under a restrictive order as it pertains to businesses, we do understand the need to begin to allow our residents to resume some sense of normalcy while exercising personal responsibility and social distancing,” Veliz wrote.

Veliz added that the city is monitoring any reopening announcements made by Gov. Ron DeSantis so the city can respond to the needs of Key West.

The Florida Keys have been closed to visitors since the coronavirus outbreak. The closure is enforced with a checkpoint.

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