Coronavirus pandemic in the US

By Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes and Elise Hammond, CNN

Updated 9:02 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020
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2:54 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

New Jersey governor won't give a date when nonessential businesses can reopen 

From CNN's Elizabeth Hartfield

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said he does not know when non-essential businesses will be able to reopen again.

Murphy told reporters Tuesday that he could not give a date yet, but stressed that it was something his administration was looking at “very carefully.”

“We are not out of the woods here,” Murphy said. 

“I think we have flattened the curve,” he added. “But we’re still not in the end zone.”

Long-term care facilities: New Jersey Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli announced today that the state was planning to conduct coronavirus testing at 74 long term care facilities in the next two weeks, prioritizing facilities with fewer cases so that immediate action could be taken to increase infection control protocols and further prevent the spread of the disease.

Both Murphy and Attorney General Gurbir Grewal said the state’s investigation into long-term care facilities was in its first phase, and that for many facilities, the coronavirus pandemic was likely the “equivalent of a 500 year flood.” 

3:03 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Ohio governor announces $775 million in budget cuts over the next 2 months

From CNN's Rebekah Riess

The Ohio Channel
The Ohio Channel

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced the state will need to make $775 million in budget cuts over the next two months.

DeWine announced that the state’s fiscal revenues to date are below budgeted estimates by $776.9 million and the state is projecting that revenues will continue to be below budget moving forward through the Covid-19 pandemic.

The governor said the pandemic doesn’t exempt the state from balancing its budget.

“Making difficult budget cut decisions now will help us down the road and will help us while we continue our discussions for the next fiscal year," he said at a news conference Tuesday.

Ohio is opting not to draw down money from its rainy day fund, making cuts instead, according to DeWine, who said Ohio will need the rainy day fund next year and possibly the year after.

According to DeWine, here is where the state’s $775 million cuts will be made:

  • Medicaid: $210 million
  • K12 Foundation payment reduction: $300 million
  • Other education budget line items: $55 million 
  • Higher education: $110 million 
  • All other agencies: $100 million 

“I have asked each agency director to continue to identify savings in their budgets for the remainder of this fiscal year and next fiscal year. Moving forward, all state agencies will continue the hiring freeze as well as the freeze on pay increases and promotions,” DeWine added.

5:18 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Sioux Falls mayor: We’re walking a "tightrope" on meat plant safety protocols

From CNN's Maureen Chowdhury

The Smithfield Foods, Inc. meat plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, reopened this week after it closed following an outbreak of coronavirus.

The city's mayor said it’s still “hard” to determine what an appropriate safety level looks like.

“I don't know how you ever get to a point where you say those environments are going to be completely safe, and that's hard,” Mayor Paul TenHaken told CNN’s John King.

WATCH:

5:18 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Iowa identifies five workplaces with Covid-19 outbreaks

Deputy Director of Iowa Public Health Sarah Reisetter
Deputy Director of Iowa Public Health Sarah Reisetter Iowa Public Broadcasting

Five different workplaces in Iowa experienced a coronavirus outbreak, officials said.

Deputy Director of Iowa Public Health Sarah Reisetter identified these workplaces as having either 10% absenteeism of its workforce or 10% of its workforce testing positive for Covid-19 or having come into close contact with someone with coronavirus.

 These are the five workplaces identified by the state:

  1. The Tyson plant in Columbus Junction, where they identified 221 positive cases, which represents 26% of the employees tested.
  2. Iowa Premium National Beef in Tama, where they identify 258 positive cases, which represents 39% of the employees tested.
  3. The Tyson plant of Waterloo has 444 positive cases, which represents 17% of the employees tested.
  4. Tyson plant in Perry had 730 positive cases, which represents 58% of the employees tested.
  5. TPI Composites in Newton had 131 positive cases, which represents 13% of the employees tested.

Reisetter described these places of employment as high risk environments for the potential of Covid-19 transmission. She said that these are places in which social distancing is impossible or impractical. The workplaces include, but are not limited to, meat packing plants, food and beverage processing plants, factories with production lines and warehouses.

3:33 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

More than 70,000 people have died from coronavirus in the US

A view of row of parked trailers as a makeshift morgue behind Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan on Monday, May 4.
A view of row of parked trailers as a makeshift morgue behind Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan on Monday, May 4. John Nacion/NurPhoto/Getty Images

There has been at least 1,192,119 cases of coronavirus in the US, according to Johns Hopkins University.

About 70,115 people have died.

Johns Hopkins reported 11,831 new cases and 1,193 reported deaths. 

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases.

Watch here:

2:23 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

West Virginia governor says they have more recovered coronavirus cases than active cases

From CNN's Carma Hassan

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice
West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice West Virginia Governor's Office

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice announced today that the state has 510 active cases of coronavirus and 667 recovered cases.

He said they have not had any coronavirus-related deaths since Saturday.

“Our overall trend line is still trending in a good way,” Justice said, referencing the number of positive cases of Covid-19.

The governor spoke more about the “West Virginia Strong” comeback plan, saying they would enter the next phase of reopening on Monday.

“The comeback is officially in effect. Again, we are telling people we are allowing you to open and not requiring you to open. The safer-at-home order is in effect. The order strongly encourages all West Virginians to remain at home but no longer orders them to stay at home," Justice said.

The governor also said that people who have exhausted their unemployment benefits can now apply for pandemic emergency unemployment compensation, which gives them a 13-week extension of their unemployment benefits.

2:05 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Small Montana schools will be among the first to reopen in the country

From CNN's Yon Pomrenze and Jessica King

Several small schools are planning to reopen in parts of Montana as soon as this Thursday, according to local education officials. The schools have under 100 students each, and have come up with comprehensive plans to ensure student and teacher safety, they say.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock said schools may reopen as soon as May 7, although it's up to the local districts to decide whether or not they wish to open, according to a release distributed April 22.

Willow Creek School, which has between 50 to 60 students in grades K-12, will be opening May 7, according to Gallatin County Superintendent of Schools, Matthew Henry.

While Willow Creek is not in his district, Henry confirmed to CNN that Willow Creek's board "had voted unanimously to reopen and practice the social distancing guidelines."

In Garfield County, the Cohagen Elementary School, grades K-8, will also reopen on May 7. 

According to Garfield County Superintendent Heather Gibson, it is a one-teacher schoolhouse with 14 students, who come from 4 families. Gibson said she believes all 14 students plan on coming back.

“We came up with a comprehensive plan to ensure that distancing was going to be possible," Gibson told CNN. "It being only 14 kids, it makes it easy," she added.

Three other schools in Gallatin County are either reopening or finalizing plans to reopen later in May.

Gallatin County currently has zero active coronavirus cases.

2:10 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Rhode Island residents will be required to wear masks in public starting Friday, governor says

From CNN’s Mirna Alsharif

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo announced today that she will sign an executive order directing all residents to wear a cloth face mask in a public place.

The order will go in to effect Friday. 

Raimondo said residents in indoor or outdoor public places will have to wear face coverings, with an exception for children, the "developmentally unable" and those with underlying breathing conditions that will make it difficult to wear a mask. 

By the numbers: Raimondo also reported 281 new coronavirus cases and 14 deaths in the state, adding that hospitalizations and Covid-19 cases are "flattening out."

"In the context of Covid-19 crisis, I feel good about where we are," Raimondo said. 

As of Tuesday, the state has a total of 9,933 positive Covid-19 cases and 355 deaths. 

5:17 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Gold’s Gym CEO on bankruptcy filing: This gives us a chance to restructure to get through pandemic

CNN's Maureen Chowdhury

Gold’s Gym is filing for bankruptcy after closing 30 corporate locations.

CEO Adam Zeitsiff says franchises are not impacted and that the closings are only for company owned locations.

“This is strictly focused on our company and giving us a chance to restructure and get through this pandemic,” Zeitsiff told CNN’s John King.

Gold's Gym said in a statement that it's "absolutely not going anywhere" and doesn't intend to permanently close any more gyms than the 30 it shuttered last month.