Coronavirus pandemic in the US

By Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes and Elise Hammond, CNN

Updated 9:02 p.m. ET, May 5, 2020
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9:50 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

85% of US Starbucks stores will reopen this week

From CNN’s Jordan Valinsky

A Starbucks employee serves a walk-up customer in South Pasadena, California, on April 7.
A Starbucks employee serves a walk-up customer in South Pasadena, California, on April 7. Harry How/Getty Images

Starbucks said it will have "responsibly reopened" about 85% of its US stores by the end of the week following an extended closure spurred by the coronavirus pandemic.

Drive-thru and orders made ahead on its app or Uber Eats will be allowed, but dine-in services have been suspended. It expects 90% of its stores to have reopened by early June.

Starbucks shares rose 3% in premarket trading after the announcement.

8:04 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

It's 8 a.m. in New York and 5 a.m. in Los Angeles. Here's the latest on the coronavirus pandemic

Specimen collection volunteers in Decatur, Georgia, work at a pop-up Covid-19 testing site at the House of Hope on May 4.
Specimen collection volunteers in Decatur, Georgia, work at a pop-up Covid-19 testing site at the House of Hope on May 4. Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution/AP

If you're just joining us, here's the latest on the coronavirus pandemic.

US cases continue to rise: At least 1,180,634 people have been infected with the novel coronavirus in the US. Almost 69,000 have died in the States so far, according to a tally kept by Johns Hopkins University.

US deaths projected to double: An influential coronavirus model often cited by the White House forecasts that 134,000 people will die of coronavirus in the US by August -- nearly double its previous prediction.

Potential vaccines in the works: There are 108 potential Covid-19 vaccines are in development around the world, according to the World Health Organization. Eight of the potential vaccines have been approved for clinical trials.

Coronavirus origin questions: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the most likely origin of the coronavirus outbreak was a wildlife wet market. His comments come as intelligence shared among US allies indicated the virus more likely came from a Chinese market and not from a lab, according to two officials.

8:04 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

108 potential Covid-19 vaccines in the works worldwide

From CNN's Elizabeth Cohen and Devon M. Sayers 

In this screen grab from video issued by Britain's University of Oxford, a volunteer is injected with either an experimental Covid-19 vaccine or a comparison shot as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential vaccine on April 25.
In this screen grab from video issued by Britain's University of Oxford, a volunteer is injected with either an experimental Covid-19 vaccine or a comparison shot as part of the first human trials in the UK to test a potential vaccine on April 25. University of Oxford/AP

The World Health Organization says 108 potential Covid-19 vaccines are in development around the world, according to documents posted on its website. 

Eight of the potential vaccines have been approved for clinical trials.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) trial in the US was the first to start testing on human subjects, on March 16.

Groups from around the world are in pre-clinical evaluation, including the University of Tokyo, Tulane University, University of Alberta and the University of Pittsburgh. In all, they total 100 groups, up from 96 on April 30th, according to the WHO.  

6:13 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Nearly 1,300 inmates have tested positive for Covid-19 in Texas prisons

Some 1,275 inmates in Texas have tested positive for Covid-19, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) reported Monday. 

At least 22 prisoners are presumed to have died from the virus, TDCJ said in a news release. An additional 12 deaths are under investigation.

In total, 461 TDCJ employees, staff or contractors have tested positive, the statement said.  

"20,063 offenders are on medical restriction because they may have had contact with either an employee or offender with a positive or pending COVID-19 test," TDCJ said. 

TDCJ said it is continuing to test inmates who are asymptomatic but may be vulnerable to Covid-19 based on age or health conditions. 

Virus hot spots: Across the US -- and in other countries around the world -- prisons and jails have become hotbeds for coronavirus. Close confinement is likely fueling the spread. But it's not just a major health problem -- there are also safety concerns, with violence erupting in several facilities.

Read more: Prisons and jails across the US are turning into 'petri dishes' for coronavirus. Deputies are falling ill, too.

6:08 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Los Angeles is still well short of its goal to provide 15,000 hotel rooms for the homeless

A homeless woman puts on her mask at a motel room provided to homeless people under the "Project Roomkey" program on April 26 in Venice Beach, California.
A homeless woman puts on her mask at a motel room provided to homeless people under the "Project Roomkey" program on April 26 in Venice Beach, California. Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images

Los Angeles is still 80% short of its goal to provide 15,000 hotel rooms for its homeless population, a month after the county announced the initiative.

On April 8, Los Angeles County launched “Project Roomkey,” a partnership between the state, county, and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority to secure hotel and motel rooms to be used as temporary shelters to prevent the spread of the coronavirus during the pandemic. 

“Project Roomkey aims to not only protect high-risk individuals, but to also prevent the spread of the deadly virus in our communities and protect the capacity of our fragile hospitals and healthcare system,” the county said. 

While the goal was to secure 15,000 rooms with state and federal funding, the latest news release from LA County shows that only 2,711 rooms have been secured.

“To date, we have 30 properties with 2,711 rooms that will be made available to the most vulnerable. As rooms become operational, vulnerable residents are moving in every day,” said a LA County spokesperson.

On LA's Skid Row -- the nation's biggest concentration of homeless people --100 coronavirus infections have been confirmed, a shelter executive told CNN on Monday. The growing number of infections have raised fears of an outbreak among the city’s homeless community. The county has a homeless population of about 60,000 people.

In a news conference on Monday, Mayor Eric Garcetti announced that the city secured a large hotel in downtown LA, providing 460 more rooms.

The county now has a total of 3,171 rooms with the new addition, which is roughly 20% of its goal.

A LA County spokesperson says negotiations with hotel and motel owners are ongoing.

“We believe that this urgent humanitarian initiative is housing more people more quickly than ever before in our region’s history,” LA County said in a statement.

California has reported at least 55,884 coronavirus cases, including 2,278 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

5:53 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

US records more than 22,000 new cases

A sign about the novel coronavirus is seen in New York on May 4.
A sign about the novel coronavirus is seen in New York on May 4. Cindy Ord/Getty Images

At least 1,180,288 cases of coronavirus have been recorded in the United States, including 68,922 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University's tally.

On Monday, Johns Hopkins recorded 22,247 new cases and 1,240 deaths. 

The totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases.

CNN is tracking US coronavirus cases here:

5:12 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

15 children hospitalized in New York with inflammatory syndrome that could be linked to Covid-19

From CNN’s Jamie Gumbrecht and Joe Sutton 

Fifteen children in New York City have been hospitalized with symptoms compatible with a multi-system inflammatory syndrome that might be linked to Covid-19, according to a health alert issued Monday evening by the New York City Health Department.   

The patients, aged 2 to 15, were hospitalized from April 17 to May 1.

Several tested positive for Covid-19 or had positive antibody tests. Some of the patients experienced persistent fever and features of Kawasaki disease or features of toxic shock syndrome. 

Kawasaki disease causes inflammation in the walls of the arteries and can limit blood flow to the heart. It is usually treatable and most children recover without serious problems, but it can be deadly.  

At least five of the cases required a ventilator and more than half of the patients required blood pressure support. So far, no fatalities have been reported among the New York City patients. 

Doctors on alert: British pediatrics specialists recently warned that a small number of children were becoming ill with Kawasaki disease that could be linked to coronavirus. 

The Paediatric Intensive Care Society UK warned about a small rise in the number of cases of critically-ill children, some who had tested positive for Covid-19, presenting "overlapping features of toxic shock syndrome and atypical Kawasaki disease with blood parameters." 

There have been similar reports in Italy and Spain.

In the US, a team at Stanford Children's Hospital reported a case with similar features. 

Read more: Rare inflammatory syndrome seen in US child with Covid-19

5:32 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Here are all the states with mandatory or recommended school closures

From CNN's Nicole Chavez and Artemis Moshtaghian

Parked school buses sit in a lot in Charlotte, North Carolina, on April 21.
Parked school buses sit in a lot in Charlotte, North Carolina, on April 21. Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Most governors in the United States have ordered or recommended that statewide school closures continue for the rest of the academic year to help reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Officials in 45 US states, as well as Washington DC, have ordered or recommended school closures for the rest of the school year, according to a CNN tally. Schools in all five US territories — American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands — also are closed for the remainder of the school year.

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
5:22 a.m. ET, May 5, 2020

Coronavirus model projects 134,000 deaths in the US

From CNN's Eric Levenson, Madeline Holcombe and Arman Azad

An aerial view shows a crowd of protesters calling to reopen businesses and beaches in Huntington Beach, California, on May 1.
An aerial view shows a crowd of protesters calling to reopen businesses and beaches in Huntington Beach, California, on May 1. David McNew/Getty Images

An influential coronavirus model often cited by the White House is now forecasting that 134,000 people will die of Covid-19 in the United States, nearly double its previous prediction.

The model, from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, previously predicted 72,433 deaths as of Monday morning.

Relatedly, a Trump administration model projects a rise in coronavirus cases and deaths in the weeks ahead, up to about 3,000 daily deaths in the US by June 1, according to an internal document obtained by The New York Times. Over the past week, about 2,000 people died daily in the US, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The sharp increases in the two models are tied to relaxed social distancing and increased mobility in the US. States across the country — including Florida, Colorado, Indiana, Nebraska and South Carolina — have eased restrictions in an attempt to revive a sputtering economy and calm restless residents.

Keep reading.