Coronavirus pandemic in the US

By Elise Hammond, Meg Wagner, Fernando Alfonso III and Rob Picheta, CNN

Updated 9:16 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020
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3:37 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Florida will allow barber shops and salons to reopen on Monday

From CNN’s Rosa Flores and Sara Weisfeldt

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced the reopening of barber shops, hair salons and nail salons in all counties currently in Phase I of the state’s reopening plan starting Monday.

DeSantis made the announcement on Twitter using a video message recorded by J Henry, the owner of J Henry’s Barber Shop in downtown Orlando. 

According to a graphic within the video, the reopening includes enhanced safety protocols such as wearing gloves and a mask.

"I know everyone is happy to come out and support the barber shop, but we want to continue to keep one thing in mind: safety is always first," J Henry said in the video.

See the tweet:

5:58 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Trump on attending event with WWII veterans without a mask: "We were very far away"

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez 

World War II veterans salute as Taps is played during a ceremony at the World War II Memorial to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day with President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, on May 8, in Washington DC.
World War II veterans salute as Taps is played during a ceremony at the World War II Memorial to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day with President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, on May 8, in Washington DC. Evan Vucci/AP

Asked if he considered wearing a mask during a ceremony with World War II veterans, President Trump said Friday afternoon, “No, because I was very far away from them.” 

“We were very far away,” Trump said, adding, “Plus the wind was blowing hard in such a direction that if the plague ever reached them I might be very surprised. It could have reached me, too. You didn’t worry about me. You only worried about them.”

What this is about: Earlier today, Trump participated in a wreath laying ceremony at the WWII Memorial to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day.

Trump greeted the veterans — all in their 90s — from a distance and did not exchange handshakes or hugs.

Earlier, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany was asked whether Trump gave any consideration to wearing a mask while meeting with the veterans, since a presidential valet recently tested positive for the virus.

“Well this President is regularly tested. This President will make the decision as to whether to wear a mask or not. I can tell you that those veterans are protected. They made the choice to come here because they’ve chosen to put their nation first. They wanted to be with their commander in chief on this momentous day,” McEnany said. 

“It was their choice to come here and I can tell you that the President always puts the safety of our veterans first,” she added.

See Trump honor VE Day with veterans:

6:14 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

California will issue further reopening guidance on Tuesday

From CNN's Cheri Mossburg

Closed shopfronts in what would be a normally busy fashion district in Los Angeles, California on May 4.
Closed shopfronts in what would be a normally busy fashion district in Los Angeles, California on May 4. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

More than two dozen California counties have reached out to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office to talk about lifting even more restrictions in order to reopen further.

Newsom plans to make more reopening announcements on a consistent basis, he said, and that will begin with subsequent guidelines coming on Tuesday.

Those guidelines will be issued by sector, with a frame of flexibility, and will provide clarification hand washing, sanitation, addressing need for pickups and how to make that safer for employees and customers.

Acknowledging deep anxiety people are feeling and a desire to reopen, Newsom said, “We will move through phase two together as a state.” 

Today, 70% of the state’s economy can reopen with modifications, Newsom indicated. It’s not 100% and won’t deliver the same revenue that companies are used to, and says “businesses may not thrive, but will survive” with the state’s support, the governor said.

3:14 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Chicago mayor introduces five-phase plan for reopening the city

From CNN's Hollie Silverman 

Pedestrians wearing protective masks walk down the street in Chicago, on May 7.
Pedestrians wearing protective masks walk down the street in Chicago, on May 7. Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot introduced the five-phase "Protecting Chicago" plan for reopening the city during a news conference Friday afternoon.

The five-phase outlines how and when businesses can safely reopen, employees can return to work and residents can resume recreational activities.

The first four phases require people to continue to social distance and wear face masks to help, Lightfoot said.

Here's a look at the phases:

  • The first phase included strict physical distancing measures and only allowed essential workers to report to work.
  • The second phase, which Lightfoot believes the city is currently in, allows residents to go out for essential activities and exercise while wearing face coverings and practicing social distancing.
  • The city will move to phase three when the science and data allows. It includes limited reopenings and nonessential employees returning to their workplaces in phases, Lightfoot said. Public amenities will also be reopening in a limited capacity.
  • If the indicators show that it is safe, phase four will allow for more reopenings, with additional businesses and public amenities becoming available, along with more restrictions.
  • The fifth phase would be a complete reopening of the city and businesses with possible caveats in place, such as workplace screening and testing, Lightfoot said.
2:55 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Boston cancels summer parades and festivals

From CNN’s Ganesh Setty and Elise Hammond

All parades and festivals in Boston are canceled for the summer, up to and including Labor Day on Sept. 7, due to coronavirus concerns, Mayor Marty Walsh announced today.

"While we're planning a healthy reopening and an equitable recovery process, I know this announcement will be disappointing to many residents and organizations that look forward to these events each year," said Walsh said in a statement.

Smaller events will be looked at by a “case by case basis,” Walsh said at a news conference Friday.

The city is looking for “creative alternatives” for the large-scale events that the city hosts, he continued.

"This is a hard public health decision, but it's the right one. I encourage people to rethink their events, and thank them for their work to inspire us, and help our communities get through this difficult time," he continued.

The city is encouraging organizers to host virtual events instead.

2:51 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Federal agency says removing vaccine chief may be retaliation, according to his lawyers

From CNN's Kaitlan Collins

The investigative office reviewing the whistleblower complaint of former vaccine chief Dr. Richard Bright has determined there is reason to believe he had been removed as retaliation and is recommending he be reinstated during the investigation, Bright’s lawyers said Friday.

The Office of the Special Counsel “advised that in light of this determination, it would contact the Department of Health and Human Services ("HHS”) to request that it stay Dr. Bright’s removal as Director of BARDA for 45 days to allow OSC sufficient time to complete its investigation of Bright’s allegations," Bright’s lawyers said in a statement.

 

3:14 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Trump confirms Katie Miller is the staffer who had coronavirus

From CNN's Jason Hoffman

Katie Miller, Vice President Mike Pence's press secretary, speaks with Marc Short, Chief of Staff for Vice President Mike Pence, in the Rose Garden of the White House on March 24, in Washington.
Katie Miller, Vice President Mike Pence's press secretary, speaks with Marc Short, Chief of Staff for Vice President Mike Pence, in the Rose Garden of the White House on March 24, in Washington. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

President Trump confirmed that Katie Miller, Vice President Mike Pence’s press secretary, is the staffer who tested positive for coronavirus. 

“She’s a wonderful young woman, Katie, she tested very good for a long period of time and then all of a sudden today she tested positive,” Trump said.

Trump never used Miller's last name in his remarks but later confirmed it was “a press person.”

The President said that Miller has not come into contact with him but noted that she has been in contact with Pence.

Watch CNN's latest reporting: 

2:39 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

Trump predicts "95,000, maybe more" will die from coronavirus

From CNN's Jason Hoffman 

US President Donald Trump meets with Republican members of the US Congress in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, on May 8.
US President Donald Trump meets with Republican members of the US Congress in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, on May 8. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump predicted Friday that the coronavirus pandemic could kill “95,000 people ultimately” across the US — again subtly adding to the numbers he has been using.

More than 76,000 people have died due to the virus in the US already, according to a daily tally tracked by Johns Hopkins University. 

Speaking with Republican members of Congress, Trump said that mitigation efforts helped limit the number of deaths from the outbreak but, “We may be talking about 95,000 people ultimately, we may be talking about something more than that."

He added that one death from coronavirus is unacceptable “let alone perhaps a 100,000.”

Some context: Trump projected between 50,000 to 60,000 US deaths from the coronavirus at a White House press briefing on April 20.

During a Fox News town hall on Sunday, Trump suggested the number would be closer to 80,000 to 90,000 people.

2:38 p.m. ET, May 8, 2020

There have been more than 14,000 confirmed coronavirus deaths in New York City

From CNN's Rob Frehse

Hospital personnel behind a barricade move deceased individuals to the overflow morgue trailer outside The Brooklyn Hospital Center on May 7, in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Hospital personnel behind a barricade move deceased individuals to the overflow morgue trailer outside The Brooklyn Hospital Center on May 7, in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

There have been at least 14,389 confirmed coronavirus deaths and at least 5,313 probable coronavirus deaths in New York City, according to the city website.

The total number of confirmed coronavirus deaths and probable coronavirus deaths in New York City is at least 19,702.

What that means: The New York City Health Department defines probable deaths as people who did not have a positive Covid-19 laboratory test, but their death certificate lists as the cause of death “COVID-19” or an equivalent.

There have been at least 176,089 coronavirus cases in the city, and at least 43,913 people have been hospitalized, according to the city.