Coronavirus pandemic in the US

By Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes, Elise Hammond and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 4:00 p.m. ET, May 12, 2020
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5:13 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Michigan governor says more than 12,000 prisoners have been tested for Covid-19

From CNN's Julie Gallagher 

State of Michigan
State of Michigan

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said 12,208 people in Michigan prisons have been tested for Covid-19

She said 2,152 people were positive for the virus and 6,162 were negative. Results for 3,894 tests are still pending.

“Michigan has tested more prisoners than any state in the country,” Whitmer said. 

The state is also offering parole at what the governor expects to be a record pace.

“Last week the parole board paroled 225 people. This week they have 273 projected paroles. Next week, they project 253, and the week of May 25, they project 303. That will likely be the highest number of paroles in one week,” Whitmer said.

5:23 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Trump suggests testing for American workers will be accessible "very soon," but offers no details

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez

Alex Brandon/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump was asked today when Americans returning to work will be able to get coronavirus tests every day, in the same way as they are conducted at the White House. 

“Very soon,” Trump replied, but offered no details, adding, “We are tested. We have great capability. You have all of these machines here, they’re incredible.”

“We do have a great testing capability at the White House. We’re doing it and, I think, generally speaking … (all the governors) were extremely happy,” he continued. 

When the reporter followed up to ask if Americans should be told to return to work before they have assurance of testing access, Trump responded, “We’re leaving that up to the governors as you know. And if we see something wrong we’ll call them out and we’ll stop it,” he said. 

Watch here:

4:52 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

US surpasses 80,000 coronavirus deaths

According to Johns Hopkins University's tally of cases, at least 80,087 people have died from coronavirus in the US.

The first known US coronavirus-related fatality was Feb. 6, 95 days ago.

 

5:11 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Trump: "I don't think the system broke down at all" after White House staffer tests positive

Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Asked about the White House official who tested positive for coronavirus and where the system broke down to allow that to happen, President Trump said, "I don't think the system broke down at all." 

"One person tested positive, surprisingly, because the previous day, tested negative. And three people that were in contact, relative contact, who I believe they've all tested totally negative, but they are going to for a period of time self-isolate. So that's not breaking down," Trump said.

What we know: A member of Vice President Mike Pence's staff tested positive for coronavirus. After that, three other administration officials announced they would self-isolate.

"The one who tested positive will be fine, will be absolutely fine," Trump said.

The administration has said that members of Trump's staff are able to get tested every day. Asked today when Americans across the country will be able to get tested every day, Trump said, "Very soon. Really very soon."

Watch here:

4:45 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Trump administration official clarifies states will receive $11 billion for testing

From CNN's Elise Hammond

Alex Brandon/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

Dr. Brett Giroir, the Health and Human Services assistant secretary, clarified that the federal government will be giving states $11 billion to be used on coronavirus testing efforts.

"As the President said, $11 billion are now being announced to be delivered to the states for the sole support of testing," Giroir said at a news briefing on Monday.

President Trump said just a few minutes before Giroir took the podium that states were receiving $1 billion.

Giroir said in order for states to receive the funding, there has to be plans in place that address testing in "vulnerable communities."

"There needs to be minimum numbers to be planned to test. They have to have plans for their vulnerable communities, including nursing homes, including those who are disabled, including those who are in prisons or who have working environments that they may have a more likelihood to spread the infection," he said.

4:59 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Trump lays out plan to help states increase testing capacity

From CNN's Elise Hammond

Alex Brandon/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump announced several efforts by the federal government to help states increase testing capacity.

"My administration located 5,000 machines in 700 labs across all 50 states and governors have learned how to maximize these testing resources. The federal government is also supporting states with vital supplies, quick approvals of new tests, and one-on-one coaching from the team here at the White House on how to increase capacity and increase it very quickly," he said on Monday.

Trump said the administration will also provide approximately 9 million transport media to transfer swabs to labs as well as expand testing in "the most underserved communities."

"Through our partnership with the private sector, leading pharmacies and retailers are now operating over 240 testing sites across the country — and that's in addition to all the other sites that we've working. Seventy percent of these sites are located in communities with unique vulnerabilities," the President said.

"There will be more than 300 sites by the end of this week and retailers are making plans to open up hundreds and hundreds more locations within the next 30 days," he added.

Watch here:

5:05 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

White House announces funding to states for testing

Alex Brandon/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump announced today that he approved the $1 billion to fund testing for the country’s “states, territories and tribes."

Assistant Secretary for Health Brett Giroir later clarified the amount that will be distributed to states, which he said is $11 billion.

"I said from the beginning that the federal government would back up the states and help them build their testing capability and capacities and that's exactly what's happened,” he said.

Trump called the funding a "major investment."

This post has been updated with the latest $11 billion figure from Assistant Secretary for Health Brett Giroir.

Watch here:

5:09 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Illinois received shipment of remdesivir over the weekend 

Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, announced Monday that the state has received its first allocation of remdesivir, the first and only drug shown to be effective against the novel coronavirus in a rigorous trial — shortening a patient's hospital stay by about four days.

The Department of Health and Human Services sent an initial shipment of remdesivir for the treatment of hospitalized Covid-19 patients, Ezike said.

“Since it was going to be impossible for every hospital to get a case, we did establish a criteria, including hospitalization and intensive care unit data, and also trying to make sure that we had an equitable transparent data driven way to allocate the medicine. It was distributed to hospitals that have seen the most critically ill Covid-19 patients. We also included safety net hospitals and hospitals treating large communities of color to address the equity aspect,” Ezike said.

The state expects to receive more remdesivir in the future, according to Ezike.

4:22 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Hydroxychloroquine could cause heart problems, new study shows

From CNN Elizabeth Cohen

 Buda Mendes/Getty Images/FILE
 Buda Mendes/Getty Images/FILE

A new study shows that hydroxychloroquine, the drug touted by President Trump, does not work against Covid-19 and could cause heart problems.

The study was the largest of its kind and was published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It follows a study published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine that also showed the drug doesn't fight the virus.

Even before these reports were published, the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health issued warnings about using the drugs for coronavirus patients. 

In the most recent study, researchers at the University at Albany looked at 1,438 patients with coronavirus who were admitted to 25 New York City area hospitals.

After statistical adjustments, the death rate for patients taking hydroxychloroquine was similar to those who did not take the drug. The death rate for those taking hydroxychloroquine plus the antibiotic azithromycin, was also similar.

The patients who took the drug combination were more than twice as likely to suffer cardiac arrest during the course of the study. Heart issues are a known side effect of hydroxychloroquine.