Coronavirus pandemic in the US

By Meg Wagner, Mike Hayes, Elise Hammond and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 4:00 p.m. ET, May 12, 2020
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11:44 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

161 people died in New York on Sunday, governor says

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

There were 161 people who died on Sunday across the state of New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

"The number of lives lost, still too high." Cuomo said.

He added that the number is "better than it has been."

Of the 161 people who died, 112 were in hospitals and 49 were in nursing homes.

The total number of deaths on Sunday is down from the 207 people who died in the state on Saturday.

11:53 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

New York is entering a "new phase" this week, Cuomo says

State of New York
State of New York

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state is entering a "new chapter" of the coronavirus pandemic this week, as the state's stay-at-home order expires on Friday.

"It's a new phase, if you will," Cuomo said. "It's an exciting new phase."

He said some regions in the state will begin reopening after the order expires. He stressed that regions will only open when they are ready: They must have testing and tracing capacity in place and show declining numbers.

11:33 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

No new Covid-19 cases or deaths in Vermont, governor says

From CNN's Carma Hassan

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott said there have been no new positive cases of coronavirus or new deaths reported as of yesterday.  

“As I’ve said, we must still be cautious, Vermonters must still remain vigilant knowing how this virus has affected some of our neighboring states,” Scott said in a news briefing on coronavirus today. 
11:31 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

US airlines say more than half of planes are grounded

From CNN's Greg Wallace

A JetBlue Airways Corp. plane taxis next to American Airlines Group Inc., Delta Air Lines Inc., and Alaska Airlines Inc. aircraft at Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Arlington, Virginia, on Monday, April 6.
A JetBlue Airways Corp. plane taxis next to American Airlines Group Inc., Delta Air Lines Inc., and Alaska Airlines Inc. aircraft at Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Arlington, Virginia, on Monday, April 6. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images

More than half of the US airline fleet is now sitting idle, according to new numbers from the industry. 

At least 3,162 planes were grounded on Sunday, representing 51% of the fleet, according to Airlines for America, which represents major air carriers. 

The measure includes planes that have not flown in the last seven days.   

The figure has hovered just shy of the 50% mark for several weeks. On Sunday, the group provided figures that showed 3,046 planes — or about 49% — were grounded as of Thursday. 

The aircraft are not needed because airlines have removed from their schedules 73% of domestic departures and 94% of international departures, according to Airlines for America. 

Taking planes out of service and cancelling flights can increase the number of passengers on a given flight. There has been a slight uptick in the number of people flying as well.

11:27 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

NYC schools are on track to open in September, mayor says

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph

School buses stand idle on the parking lot of the Bronx borough during COVID-19 pandemic as seen on Wednesday, April, 29.
School buses stand idle on the parking lot of the Bronx borough during COVID-19 pandemic as seen on Wednesday, April, 29. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city's schools are still poised to be open this fall, but he noted that officials are watching the pediatric multi-inflammatory syndrome linked to coronavirus as they assess what's best for students.

 "Anything we do about schools is going to be led by health and safety first - that's absolutely the first question in any reopening. As of this moment, we believe we can reopen schools safely and well in September, but we have to keep a very close watch on this syndrome to make sure that we attack it in every way possible in the meantime."

What this is about: Last week, New York State Department of Health reported some children have developed an inflammatory syndrome possibly linked to the coronavirus. 

"Thankfully most children with COVID-19 only experience mild symptoms, but in some, a dangerous inflammatory syndrome can develop," New York State Department of Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said in a statement.

New York is investigating if the cases contradict the belief that children are less at risk for coronavirus and what other hospitals should look out for, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

11:19 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Mnuchin says "most" states are cooperating with federal guidelines as they begin reopening

From CNN's Ali Main with Betsy Klein

Steven Mnuchin, U.S. Treasury secretary, listens during a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) at the White House in Washington, DC, on Tuesday, April 28.
Steven Mnuchin, U.S. Treasury secretary, listens during a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) at the White House in Washington, DC, on Tuesday, April 28. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin phoned in to CNBC this morning as the stock market opened down.

Mnuchin said "most" states are cooperating with federal guidelines as they begin the process of reopening. Responding to Tesla CEO Elon Musk's threat over the weekend to move the company's headquarters out of California after local officials refused to let the company reopen its Fremont factory, Mnuchin said he agreed with Musk.

"He's one of the biggest employers and manufacturers in California, and California should prioritize doing whatever they need to do to solve those health issues so that he can open quickly or safely or they're going to find, as he's threatened, he's moving his production to a different state," Mnuchin said.

Mnuchin said that there were "ongoing discussions" in the administration on how to assess which states are deserving of federal aid. He reiterated that the President and congressional Republicans are against "bailing out" state pensions. Mnuchin said although Democrats have expressed a desire to "throw a lot of money" at the problem of state aid, he has not heard from Democrats that they are willing to put money toward state pensions either. 

"I think it's very clear there is not going to be bipartisan support that bails out states from previous problems," Mnuchin said. He also highlighted lending facilities opened by the Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department to help states with cash flow issues.

Asked why he would not view the issue of states that rely heavily on sales tax revenues laying off workers as they face budget shortfalls with immediacy, Mnuchin said the CARES Act did give lot of money to the states, which was intended for coronavirus-related expenses, not for lost revenues. He said the federal government recently gave states more flexibility in allowing the use of these funds to keep first responders employed.

"The issue of lost revenues is a complicated issue. These are taxing authorities on their own, different states tax different ways. Some states have more issues. Some states have less issues," Mnuchin said, adding that he will continue to discuss the issue with President Trump and Congress.

11:03 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

110 potential Covid-19 vaccines are in the works, World Health Organization says

From CNN Health’s Devon Sayers

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The World Health Organization says 110 potential Covid-19 vaccines are in development around the world, according to documents posted on the organization’s website today.

Eight of the potential vaccines are in clinical trials, including groups from the United States, the UK and China.

Another 102 groups from around the world are in pre-clinical evaluation, including groups at the University of Tokyo, Tulane University, University of Alberta and the University of Pittsburgh — up from 100 on May 5, according to WHO.

10:54 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Abbott Labs receives second FDA emergency authorization for antibody test

From CNN's Amanda Watts

David J. Phillip/AP
David J. Phillip/AP

Abbott Laboratories received its second Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to produce a coronavirus antibody test, according to a statement by Abbott on Monday. 

Abbott said the company plans to ship its serology-based blood test on the Alinity i system with nearly 30 million antibody tests globally in May and “capacity for 60 million tests in June.”  

“Having more options of highly reliable tests across our platforms will help healthcare workers and health officials as they conduct broad scale testing for Covid-19," said Robert Ford, Abbott’s president and chief executive officer.

The first serology test by Abbott was approved for an EUA on April 26 and runs on Abbott’s ARCHITECT system. 

The EUA has not posted to the FDA website at this time. CNN has reached out to the FDA, but has not heard back.

10:49 a.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Americans' average spending picked up last month, Bank of America CEO says

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan speaks during an event in New York on October 23, 2019.
Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan speaks during an event in New York on October 23, 2019. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan says consumer spending is picking up, with averages over the last four weeks equaling those of fall 2017.

"If you look at the spending by the consumers of Bank of America today, in the last four weeks, spending averaged about what it did in the fall of 2017," he said,

The Bank of America research team has predicted that the economy would be down this quarter by about 30% and then by 1% in the next quarter, he added.

"It starts to grow in the fourth quarter 2020. But it takes all the way to the end of next year to get an economy which is about the same size that was last year."

Comparing to a general fall in consumer demand which results in a crisis, this was a shutdown. But as states reopen, industries like medical services will recover faster but restaurants might take longer, he said, adding that a fourth stimulus bill should target people and institutions most affected during this crisis.

Moynihan also denied allegations in the lawsuit filed against Bank of America and other big banks, arguing that applications for higher loan amounts were prioritized over small players in the first round of Congress-approved funding for small business owners.

"We have now done 300,000 SBA loans for about 25 billion. So 7% of the program in terms of numbers of loans and less than 5% in terms of dollar amounts. So, we're doing smaller loans than the rest of the participants in the program."

Of the 300,000 small businesses that Bank of America provides to, 98% have less than 100 employees, and about 80% have less than 10 employees, he added.