March 11 coronavirus news

By Veronica Rocha, Fernando Alfonso III, Joshua Berlinger, Jessie Yeung, Adam Renton and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 12:02 a.m. ET, March 12, 2020
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11:27 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Trump misrepresents Europe travel ban during primetime address, causing confusion

From CNN's Jeremy Diamond

President Donald Trump speaks in an address to the nation from the Oval Office at the White House about the coronavirus Wednesday, March, 11, 2020, in Washington.
President Donald Trump speaks in an address to the nation from the Oval Office at the White House about the coronavirus Wednesday, March, 11, 2020, in Washington. Doug Mills/The New York Times/Pool/AP

In a primetime address to millions of Americans, President Trump misrepresented the travel restrictions he is imposing on travel between the United States and Europe.

Trump said "we will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next 30 days" before adding that there will be "exemptions for Americans who have undergone appropriate screenings."

Those exemptions are far more extensive than the President made them out to be. They apply to all US legal permanent residents, citizens and some of their family members, according to a statement from the Department of Homeland Security. 

The travel restrictions Trump is enacting are in fact far more similar to those enacted on China.

The ban also does not apply to all of Europe but to nations in the Schengen zone. That includes Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. 

What this means: Americans and US permanent residents who are in Europe will still be allowed to fly to Europe and be allowed back into the United States during this 30-day period. 

They will simply be screened upon entry to the United States and face quarantine or restrictions on their movement in the US for 14 days. 

However, it is not clear whether airlines will still fly the routes if passenger demand from European nationals dries up because of the ban. 

Trump also appeared to correct himself on a ban on cargo. In his speech he said, "There will be exemptions for Americans who have undergone appropriate screenings and these prohibitions will not only apply to the tremendous amount of trade and cargo, but various other things as we get approval. " 

A few minutes ago, the President tweeted, "...please remember, very important for all countries & businesses to know that trade will in no way be affected by the 30-day restriction on travel from Europe. The restriction stops people not goods." 

This is not to say the President is not taking an extremely severe step, but it is not the all-encompassing suspension on travel between the United States and Europe that the President portrayed.

10:42 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

New York City cancels its St. Patrick's Day Parade

The St. Patrick’s Day parade in New York City has officially been canceled, according to a statement from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office.

"Today I had several conversations with the organizers of the St. Patrick's Day Parade to determine whether the parade should move forward in light of the evolving coronavirus situation and increased case count in the New York City area," Cuomo said in a statement.

He continued: "Following those conversations, I recommended and the parade's leadership agreed to postpone this year's parade due to the high density and the large volume of marchers and spectators who attend. While I know the parade organizers did not make this decision lightly, public health experts agree that one of the most effective ways to contain the spread of the virus is to limit large gatherings and close contacts, and I applaud the parade's leadership for working cooperatively with us. While the risk to New Yorkers remains low and we want to avoid social and economic disruptions, we have an obligation to take action to contain the spread of this virus."

Watch:

10:31 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Twitter requires all employees globally to work from home

From CNN’s Brian Stelter

Employees walk past a lighted Twitter log as they leave the company's headquarters in San Francisco on August 13, 2019.
Employees walk past a lighted Twitter log as they leave the company's headquarters in San Francisco on August 13, 2019. Glenn Chapman/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter announced on their website that they have informed all employees globally they must work from home. 

“We understand this is an unprecedented step, but these are unprecedented times. And we will continue to do all that we can to support our Tweeps,” the post said.

 

10:01 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

A rush of news just came in. Let us catch you up quickly.

A lot is happening right now in the US as organizations around the country prepare to deal with the coronavirus outbreak.

If you're just tuning in, here's where things stand right now:

  • US suspends travel from Europe: President Trump announced Wednesday night that all travel from Europe will be suspended for the next 30 days, starting Friday at midnight.
  • Tom Hanks infected: The two-time Academy Award winning actor says he and his wife, actress Rita Wilson, have been diagnosed with coronavirus. In a statement posted to Instagram, Hanks said the two were traveling in Australia when they were tested. 
  • NBA suspends season: The NBA has announced Wednesday night that the season is being suspended after a player from the Utah Jazz tested positive for COVID-19.
  • Numerous tournaments affected: The NCAA’s Big 12 and Big Ten conferences announced Wednesday that they will play their conference tournament games without fans in attendance. The decision for limited access from the conferences comes after NCAA president Mark Emmert announced that the popular "March Madness" tournament will be held with only essential staff and family members on Thursday and suggesting that conference tournaments follow suit.  
  • More states declare state of emergencies: As coronavirus continues to spread across the US, 23 states and Washington, DC, have declared a state of emergency. Arizona, New Mexico, Louisiana, Arkansas and Washington, DC, all made their declarations today.
9:41 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Trump cancels trips to Colorado and Nevada due to the coronavirus outbreak

From CNN's Betsy Klein 

President Trump will no longer travel to Colorado and Nevada at the end of the week. 

“Out of an abundance of caution from the coronavirus outbreak, the President has decided to cancel his upcoming events in Colorado and Nevada,” White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement. 
10:32 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

NBA to suspend season following Wednesday night's games

Philadelphia 76ers' Matisse Thybulle, right, goes up for a dunk against Detroit Pistons' Christian Wood during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Wednesday, March 11, in Philadelphia.
Philadelphia 76ers' Matisse Thybulle, right, goes up for a dunk against Detroit Pistons' Christian Wood during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Wednesday, March 11, in Philadelphia. Matt Slocum/AP

The NBA has announced that the season is being suspended after a Utah Jazz player tested positive for COVID-19.

Read the NBA's full statement:

The NBA announced that a player on the Utah Jazz has preliminarily tested positive for COVID-19. The test result was reported shortly prior to the tip-off of tonight’s game between the Jazz and Oklahoma City Thunder at Chesapeake Energy Arena. At that time, tonight’s game was canceled. The affected player was not in the arena.
The NBA is suspending game play following the conclusion of tonight’s schedule of games until further notice. The NBA will use this hiatus to determine next steps for moving forward in regard to the coronavirus pandemic.

Watch:

9:34 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Actor Tom Hanks diagnosed with coronavirus

From CNN's Sandra Gonzalez

Amy Sussman/Getty Images/FILE
Amy Sussman/Getty Images/FILE

Actor Tom Hanks says he and his wife, actress Rita Wilson, have been diagnosed with coronavirus. 

In a statement posted to Instagram, Hanks said the two were traveling in Australia when they were tested. 

"Well, now. What to do next? The Medical Officials have protocols that must be followed. We Hanks’ will be tested, observed, and isolated for as long as public health and safety requires. Not much more to it than a one-day-at-a-time approach, no?" Hanks wrote. 

CNN has contacted a representative for Hanks for additional comment.

Hanks shared the following image and message on Instagram:

11:03 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Trump to provide emergency financial relief for those impacted by coronavirus

From CNN's Matthew Hoye

President Trump said during his Oval Office address tonight that he would be providing emergency economic relief for Americans impacted by the novel coronavirus.

“To ensure that working Americans who are impacted by the virus can stay home without fear of financial hardship, I will soon be taking emergency action, which is unprecedented, to provide financial relief. This will be targeted for workers who are ill, quarantined or caring for others due to coronavirus. I will be asking Congress to take legislative action to extend this relief,” Trump said.

The President tried to reassure that “this is not a financial crisis.”

“This is a just a temporary moment of time that we will overcome as a nation and as a world,” he continued.

The President announced additional actions, some of which has been previously known. 

“I am instructing the Small Business Administration to exercise available authority to provide capital and liquidity to firms affected by the coronavirus. Effective immediately the SBA will begin to providing economic loans in effected states and territories. These low interest loans will help small businesses overcome temporary economic disruptions caused by the virus,” Trump said. 

The President said he would be requesting Congress increase funding for this program by $50 billion. 

11:03 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Trump will suspend all travel from Europe to the US for next 30 days

President Trump announced tonight that all travel from Europe to the United States will be suspended for the next 30 days, except for the UK.

Trump made the decision in order to "keep new cases from entering our shores." He said the new rule will go into effect beginning Friday at midnight.

"We will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next 30 days. The new rules will go into effect Friday at midnight. These restrictions will be adjusted subject to conditions on the ground," the President said from the Oval Office.

Trump said there will be certain exemptions made for certain Americans "who have undergone appropriate screenings."

"These prohibitions will not only apply to the tremendous amount of trade and cargo, but various other things as we get approval. Anything coming from Europe to the United States is what we are discussing. These restrictions will also not apply to the United Kingdom," Trump added.

Watch:

This post has been updated to clarify that Trump said the US is restricting travel from Europe, though the effect of the one-way ban will likely have broader ramifications for US travelers.