March 11 coronavirus news

By Veronica Rocha, Fernando Alfonso III, Joshua Berlinger, Jessie Yeung, Adam Renton and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 12:02 a.m. ET, March 12, 2020
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11:35 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Pittsburgh cancels St. Patrick's Day parade

From CNN's Amanda Watts

The City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is cancelling this weekend’s St. Patrick’s Day parade due to concerns over novel coronavirus, according to a statement from the mayor’s office.

“Due to ongoing concerns over the rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus, the City of Pittsburgh today is joining cities around the globe – including Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Philadelphia and Dublin, Ireland – in cancelling the St. Patrick’s Day parade planned for Saturday, March 14," the statement said.

“The health of our residents and visitors to our city must be our main priority,” Mayor William Peduto said. “This mitigation measure will help keep people in Pittsburgh and Western Pa. safe.”

There are currently 14 cases of coronavirus across Pennsylvania. None of those cases are in Allegheny County, where Pittsburgh is, the statement said. 

11:32 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Disney says coronavirus outbreak has been "challenging"

From CNN’s Michelle Toh and Frank Pallotta

A general view shows the Disney Castle at Disneyland in Shanghai, China, on March 10.
A general view shows the Disney Castle at Disneyland in Shanghai, China, on March 10. Credit: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Disney’s executive chairman Bob Iger admitted that the coronavirus outbreak has been “challenging” for the company, but that it's strong enough to weather any downturn.

“I think it’s fair to say that we’re all sobered by the concern that we feel for everyone effected by this global crisis,” the former CEO said at Disney’s annual investor conference. 

“These are challenging times for everyone. But it’s also important to note that throughout our company’s nearly century long history Disney has been through a lot, including wars and economic downturns and natural disasters. What we’ve demonstrating repeatedly over the years is that we are incredibly resilient," he added.

How Disney has responded to coronavirus: Disney closed its parks in Shanghai and Hong Kong in January, warning that profits from its facilities in China could drop by $280 million in the current quarter.

The company has also temporarily shuttered its parks in Japan.

“Our future has always been bright, and it remains so for good reason,” Iger added. “In fact, when you think about the world today, what we create at the Walt Disney Co. has never been more necessary or more important.”

11:17 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Top US health official says NBA should consider playing games without crowds

Spectators look on as RJ Barrett of the New York Knicks walks on court during a game against the Washington Wizards, at Capital One Arena in Washington, DC on Tuesday.
Spectators look on as RJ Barrett of the New York Knicks walks on court during a game against the Washington Wizards, at Capital One Arena in Washington, DC on Tuesday. Patrick Smith/Getty Images

When asked if he thinks NBA games should go on during the outbreak, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he would not suggest it.

“We would recommend there not be large crowds, if that means not having any people in the audience when the NBA plays, so be it,” Fauci said while speaking in front on the House Oversight Committee about the novel coronavirus response.

“As a public health official, anything that has large crowds is something that would give a risk to spread,” Fauci added. 

11:02 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Is coronavirus especially harmful for pregnant women?

Your coronavirus questions, answered

Long story short: There's not enough data yet, considering this coronavirus just emerged in humans a few months ago.

The vulnerability of "older adults" has been well documented, but researchers "do not have information from published scientific reports about susceptibility of pregnant women" to this coronavirus, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

"Based on limited case reports, adverse infant outcomes (e.g., preterm birth) have been reported among infants born to mothers positive for Covid-19 during pregnancy," the CDC says.

"However, it is not clear that these outcomes were related to maternal infection, and at this time the risk of adverse infant outcomes is not known."

11:05 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Chicago River won't be dyed green for St. Patrick's Day, mayor says

Workers dye the Chicago River green in celebration of St. Patrick's day in March 2019, in Chicago, Illinois.
Workers dye the Chicago River green in celebration of St. Patrick's day in March 2019, in Chicago, Illinois. Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago is postponing its annual tradition of dying the city's river green for St. Patrick's Day, "out of an abundance of caution," Mayor Lori Lightfoot said at a morning press briefing. 

Earlier today, officials announced that the city's St. Patrick's Day parade, set for Saturday, was postponed.

"Having a parade at this time posed unnecessary risk to the public's health" drawing millions of people from around the world to the city, Lightfoot said. Lightfoot will work with organizers for possible days to have the St. Partick's Day events in the future. 

City officials said going to polling locations for the Illinois 2020 primary — scheduled for Tuesday — is still safe. Lightfoot reminded residents that they can still cast ballots in the mail. 

10:47 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

3 California TSA employees test positive for coronavirus

From CNN's Greg Wallace

Transportation Security Administration Administrator David Pekoske said three San Jose, California, TSA employees with coronavirus are all receiving medial care.

"We have identified their coworkers that have sustained contact with them within the last 14 days and placed those individuals on weather and safety leave until the 14 day window closes," he said in an opening statement before House Homeland Committee.

The TSA has "thoroughly disinfected" the worksite at the San Jose airport, he added.

4:09 p.m. ET, March 11, 2020

US government makes it easier for airlines to cancel flights

From CNN's Greg Wallace

People walk through an international departure terminal at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City, on March 7.
People walk through an international departure terminal at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City, on March 7. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Federal Aviation Administration announced today that due the coronavirus-related flight cancelations, it will waive a requirement that the industry says could otherwise lead to airlines running empty flights. 

The requirement normally requires that airlines use 80% of their assigned runway slots at several busy airports — including LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy in New York and Reagan National in Washington, DC. 

There are four other airports — Chicago O'Hare, Newark Liberty, Los Angeles International and San Francisco — at which the agency has a formal schedule review and approval process. The FAA said it will give credit to airlines for flights that were canceled at those airports due to the virus.

Most major US airlines have moved to cancel a significant portion of their flights due to the outbreak, raising the possibility that they will not meet the targets. Without the waiver, the airlines risked losing their slots. 

The agency said the waiver is good through the end of May.  

10:35 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Top US health official says "it's going to get worse"

From CNN's Suzanne Malveaux on Capitol Hill 

Dr. Anthony Fauci speaks during a press briefing at the White House on Tuesday.
Dr. Anthony Fauci speaks during a press briefing at the White House on Tuesday. Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who is one of several officials testifying in front of the US House Oversight Committee, told Chair Carolyn Maloney that the country should expect things to get worse.

Here's how their exchange went down:

Maloney: “Is the worst yet to come Dr. Fauci?”

Fauci: “Yes it is... Things will get worse...The bottom line it’s going to get worse.”

10:19 a.m. ET, March 11, 2020

Kentucky suspends inmates' visitation rights because of coronavirus

From CNN’s Anna Sturla

Governor Beshear speaks in February.
Governor Beshear speaks in February. Bryan Woolston/AP

Kentucky is suspending visitation rights for those held in state prisons and similar institutions in light of the coronavirus, Gov. Andy Beshear announced today.

Inmates will instead be allowed one free call, and up to two contacts through controlled social media. 

Beshear said there are eight cases of coronavirus in the state, and all patients are "stable, doing well.” 

"A couple of these individuals may almost be through this," Beshear said. "And that is very, very good news."