March 20 coronavirus news

By Helen Regan, Joshua Berlinger, Julia Hollingsworth, Adam Renton, Steve George and Fernando Alfonso III, CNN

Updated 9:27 p.m. ET, March 20, 2020
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12:31 a.m. ET, March 20, 2020

Senate Intelligence chairman sold off stock ahead of coronavirus economic downturn

From CNN's Jeremy Herb

Senator Richard Burr (R-NC) heads back to the Senate floor following a recess in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on February 3, in Washington, DC.
Senator Richard Burr (R-NC) heads back to the Senate floor following a recess in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on February 3, in Washington, DC. Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr and his wife sold as much as $1.7 million in stock last month ahead of the sharp market decline that's resulted from the novel coronavirus global pandemic, according to Senate documents.

Two weeks later, the North Carolina Republican sounded a blunt warning in February about the dire impact of the novel coronavirus during a private event in Washington, according to audio obtained by NPR, which contrasted with President Donald Trump's public statements at the time that suggested the virus would disappear.

Burr's committee has received periodic briefings on coronavirus as the outbreak has spread, but the committee did not receive briefings on the virus the week of Burr's stock sales, according to a source familiar with the matter.

A week before his stock sell-off, Burr authored an op-ed with GOP Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee titled, "Coronavirus prevention steps the U.S. government is taking to protect you." Burr has also worked on legislation aiding US preparations for pandemics for years.

On February 13, Burr and his wife sold between $628,000 and $1.7 million in stock in 33 transactions, according to Senate financial disclosure records. Burr and his spouse also sold between $80,000 and $200,000 of stock on January 31, and purchased between $16,000 and $65,000 of stock on February 4. The majority of the sales were from Burr's wife, the records show, between $520,000 and $1.2 million.

There's no indication that the stock sales were made on the basis of any inside information Burr received as a senator, or that he broke any Senate rules by selling the stock. Congress passed the Stock Act in 2012 that made it illegal for lawmakers to use inside information for financial benefit. Burr was one of three senators to vote against the bill.

Read more here:

12:03 a.m. ET, March 20, 2020

25 people have now been killed by the coronavirus in Indonesia

From CNN's Akanksha Sharma in Hong Kong

A security guard checks a passenger's body temperature at Tugu train station on March 12, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
A security guard checks a passenger's body temperature at Tugu train station on March 12, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Twenty-five people in Indonesia who contracted the coronavirus have now died, according to the nation’s novel coronavirus response team spokesperson, Achmad Yurianto.

Six new deaths were reported in the country on Thursday -- five in the capital of Jakarta and one in Central Java.

Indonesia has the highest coronavirus death toll of any country in Southeast Asia. The Philippines has reported 17 coronavirus-related deaths, while Malaysia has reported two, according to state media in those countries.

At least 309 people have contracted the virus, 15 of whom have recovered, Yurianto said.

Authorities in Indonesia are suspending visa-free travel for foreign passengers and visa-on-arrival options for the next month as part of efforts to stop the virus' spread.

11:53 p.m. ET, March 19, 2020

About 25 million Californians could be impacted by the coronavirus, governor estimates

From CNN’s Alexandra Meeks

Freeway 110 is pictured with downtown Los Angeles, California in the background on March 19, 2020.
Freeway 110 is pictured with downtown Los Angeles, California in the background on March 19, 2020. Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images

Coronavirus tracking models in California show that the virus could infect "56% of our state’s population -- 25.5 million people," in eight weeks, Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a letter to President Trump.

If those numbers hold, that could be a problem because the state may not have the capacity to hospitalize all who need it.

“We have the capacity to surge the number of hospital beds beyond the 78,000 currently staffed beds by an additional 10,207," Newsom said.

Newsom said dorm rooms at University of California and California State school systems would be converted to temporarily house coronavirus patients.

He said the state had acquired a hospital in Northern California and will make an announcement tomorrow regarding a hospital in Southern California that will support coronavirus containment efforts.

“If we change our behaviors that inventory will come down, if we meet this moment we can truly bend the curve to reduce the need to surge -- to have to go out to have to cobble together all those assets together,” Newsom said.
11:37 p.m. ET, March 19, 2020

Toyota, Honda and Nissan are all halting production at their US plants

From CNN's Yoko Wakatsuki in Tokyo

Workers inspect Camry vehicles at the Toyota plant in Georgetown, Kentucky, on Thursday, August 29, 2019.
Workers inspect Camry vehicles at the Toyota plant in Georgetown, Kentucky, on Thursday, August 29, 2019. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japanese automakers Toyota, Honda and Nissan have all announced that their factories in the United States will halt production in a bid to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

Toyota is halting all shifts at North American plants from March 23 until April 3.

Nissan is suspending manufacturing at its US facilities from Friday until April 6.

Honda is suspending production for six days beginning March 23. The company said in a statement about 27,600 Honda associates in North America will be affected and that production will decline by about 40,000 vehicles during that time.

11:55 p.m. ET, March 19, 2020

45 million people have been ordered to stay home as Argentina enacts a nationwide lockdown

From CNN's Tatiana Arias

Argentina President Alberto Fernandez has ordered people to stay home in an effort to curb the spread of coronavirus.
Argentina President Alberto Fernandez has ordered people to stay home in an effort to curb the spread of coronavirus. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images

Argentina President Alberto Fernandez has enacted new measures ordering people to stay in their homes with limited exceptions as part of the country's push to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Fernandez explained in a televised address late Sunday in the capital of Buenos Aires that the emergency measures would remain in force until the end of the month.

People are allowed to leave for basic needs like grocery shopping or doctor's appointments. Police will be patrolling the streets and those without a valid reason to be outside will be penalized, Fernandez said.

To date, the country has reported 128 coronavirus cases and three fatalities, according to its ministry of health.

Argentina has a population of over 45.5 million people, according to the CIA World Factbook.

11:08 p.m. ET, March 19, 2020

Just joining us? Here's the latest on the coronavirus pandemic

California Street, usually filled with cable cars, is seen empty in San Francisco, California on March 18.
California Street, usually filled with cable cars, is seen empty in San Francisco, California on March 18. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

The numbers: Johns Hopkins University, which is tracking cases reported by the World Health Organization and additional sources, puts the total number of cases worldwide at more than 243,000 with at least 9,800 deaths.

Californians ordered to stay home: Around 40 million residents have been told to stay home to prevent the spread of the virus -- the first statewide order in the US. California is the most populous US state and is the country's largest state economy.

US travel advisory: The US State Department has issued a worldwide Level 4: Do Not Travel Advisory due the coronavirus pandemic. In the US, there are at least 13,133 cases of the virus, and 195 deaths.

Italy death toll: The total number of fatalities reported in the country at the new epicenter of the outbreak has now surpassed China's death toll. The number of deaths in Italy reached 3,405 on Thursday -- 157 more than China's toll, which stands at 3,248.

China no new domestic cases: Mainland China recorded 39 new cases of coronavirus -- all imported from overseas -- on Thursday. It's the second consecutive day of no new domestically transmitted infections. It's also the second day in a row of no new confirmed cases in Hubei province -- ground zero for the pandemic.

Olympic Torch: The Olympic flame arrived in Japan on Friday, marking the beginning of official Olympic celebrations. The International Olympic Committee said it is "fully committed" to holding the Games but the next few weeks could prove decisive in whether it will go ahead this summer.

10:54 p.m. ET, March 19, 2020

China reports no new locally transmitted cases for a second day. But it found 39 new imported cases

From Shanshan Wang in Beijing

A Chinese man wears a protective mask as he rides the bus on March 19 in Beijing, China.
A Chinese man wears a protective mask as he rides the bus on March 19 in Beijing, China. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

Mainland China reported 39 new cases of coronavirus -- all imported from overseas -- and three new deaths as of end of day Thursday, according to the country's National Health Commission.

This brings the death toll in mainland China to 3,248 and total confirmed cases to 80,967.

Thursday is the second day China has reported no increase in domestically transmitted coronavirus cases.

It is also the second day no new confirmed cases were reported in Hubei province, the epicenter of the pandemic.

Concerns over a so-called "second wave" of infections have increased in recent days as the number of imported cases -- linked to overseas travel -- have risen throughout Asia.

In China, authorities have escalated quarantine measures on international arrivals to avoid further outbreaks.

And in the capital, Beijing, all passengers arriving from overseas are now required to go into "collective quarantine at designated facilities." Beijing residents were previously allowed to quarantine themselves in their own homes.

10:59 p.m. ET, March 19, 2020

California's governor has ordered all 40 million residents to stay home. That's a big deal

People gather on Santa Monica beach in California on March 17.
People gather on Santa Monica beach in California on March 17. Mario Tama/Getty Images

California's governor has ordered all 40 million residents to stay home to stop the spread of coronavirus.

Though San Francisco and Los Angeles enacted similar measures, it's still a very big deal.

California is the most populous state in the US. It's also an economic powerhouse, home to the capital of the entertainment industry (Los Angeles) and the world's most important technology hub (Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area). The Central California Valley is one of the United States' most important bread baskets.

According to Forbes, California's economy is worth over $3 trillion. If it were a country, it would be the fifth-biggest economy in the world, after the US, China, Japan and Germany, and ahead of the United Kingdom and India.

Before California Gov. Gavin Newsom's announcement, 21.3 million California residents were already under a "shelter in place" order.

“There's a recognition of our interdependence, that requires of this moment that we direct a statewide order for people to stay at home,” Newsom said, speaking of those who were already told to stay home.
“We were confident, we are confident, that the people, the state of California will ... do the right thing,” he added.

When does the order go into place? The order will go into effect today and will remain in place until further notice.

What's closed? Dine-in restaurants, bars, nightclubs and gyms will be shuttered. Public events are also banned

What will still be open? Gas stations, pharmacies, banks, food stores, and laundromats will still be open. Essential state and local government functions will also remain open, including law enforcement and offices that provide government programs and services.

Read more here. And here are more details on what you can and can't do during a "shelter-in-place" order.

Watch:

10:53 p.m. ET, March 19, 2020

India prohibits export of masks and ventilators

From CNN's Vedika Sud in New Delhi

The Indian government has prohibited the export of masks, ventilators and raw textile materials for masks and coveralls.

India's Minister of Commerce, Piyush Goyal, confirmed the news in a tweet, and said the action has been taken in a "bid to utilize the nation’s resources for the well being of Indian citizens."

The news comes a day after the country issued fresh guidelines, banning all international commercial passenger flights from landing in India from March 22.

The directive will be in place for a week. 

What other measures is India taking? The Indian government is directing state governments to advise citizens above 65 and children below 10 to stay home. This excludes public representatives, medical professionals and government employees. 

States have also been requested to enforce work from home for private sector employees, except those working in emergency or essential services.

There are more than 190 confirmed cases in India and four deaths.