March 22 coronavirus news

By Julia Hollingsworth, Jenni Marsh, Rob Picheta, Fernando Alfonso III and Amir Vera, CNN

Updated 10:30 p.m. ET, March 22, 2020
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10:57 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

There are now more than 8,115 coronavirus cases in New York City

From CNN’s Mark Morales

A doctor examines a patient inside a testing tent at St. Barnabas hospital on March 20 in New York City.
A doctor examines a patient inside a testing tent at St. Barnabas hospital on March 20 in New York City. Misha Friedman/Getty Images

New York City has now recorded 8,115 coronavirus cases and 60 deaths.

About 1,450 people have been hospitalized -- and at least 370 of those are in intensive care.

New York State has 12,260 coronavirus confirmed cases and 70 deaths, making it the worst-affected state in the United States.

10:39 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

The Goo Goo Dolls' lead singer held a porch concert to help small businesses

From CNN's Lauren M. Johnson

Shelley Brindle/Westfield, NJ
Shelley Brindle/Westfield, NJ

A city in New Jersey is raising money for small businesses with the help of the Goo Goo Dolls' frontman. 

Westfield Mayor Shelley Brindle told CNN she is neighbors with the band's lead singer, John Rzeznik, and decided he would be the perfect person to kick off the new "We Love Local" fundraiser. 

The idea is to have a series of porch concerts, and other events, to help raise money for small businesses affected by social distancing due to the coronavirus. Brindle was inspired by a porch concert the town had for St. Patrick's Day.

"[Rzeznik] is incredibly generous and has always said to me to let him know if there is anything he can do for the town. His preference notably is he would love to raise money for good things," Brindle said. 

"I said, 'Hey, would you be willing to do this porch performance to support this fundraiser?' and in five seconds he texted back and said 'Yes!'"

The concert was streamed Friday on Facebook Live and Brindle said people tuned in from all over the world. 

The gig helped raise $25,000 for local businesses.

Read the whole story here.

10:28 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

China reports no new cases of coronavirus in Hubei. But imported cases continue to rise

From CNN’s Shanshan Wang in Beijing

A worker disinfects a room at the Red Cross hospital in Wuhan, in China's central Hubei province on March 18.
A worker disinfects a room at the Red Cross hospital in Wuhan, in China's central Hubei province on March 18. STR/AFP/Getty Images

China confirmed six new deaths and 46 additional cases of novel coronavirus as of the end of day Saturday, according to China's National Health Commission (NHC). 

None of the latest cases were reported out of Hubei province -- the epicenter of China's outbreak -- making this the fourth straight day that the province has seen no new cases.

Of the 46 new cases, 45 were imported, bringing the total number of imported cases to 314. 

The death toll in Hubei is now 3,144, and the nation's overall death toll stands at 3,261. In total, China has had 81,054 confirmed coronavirus cases, according to NHC. 

The NHC added that 72,244 patients in mainland China had recovered and been discharged from hospital.

10:18 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

Cultural events are being canceled amid the coronavirus. So what?

From CNN's Stephy Chung

The square in front of the pyramid of the Louvre Museum in Paris is empty on March 18.
The square in front of the pyramid of the Louvre Museum in Paris is empty on March 18. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

Major events around the world have been canceled or postponed as the race to contain the novel coronavirus continues. The cultural sector -- with its numerous fairs, shows and festivals -- has also been significantly impacted.

What has been affected: Countless art institutions, museums and galleries have been temporarily shuttered. The Louvre in Paris, which houses the famous "Mona Lisa," is closed until further notice. A blockbuster exhibition marking the 500th anniversary of the death of Italian Renaissance painter Raphael was suspended days after opening in Rome.

Organizers have pulled the plug on Glastonbury, the UK's largest music festival, which was celebrating its 50th anniversary. In New York, the lights are out on Broadway, with performances canceled until mid-April. Fashion's biggest night, The Met Gala, has been postponed.

Why this is a big deal: Of course, such closures can seem immaterial compared to the public health crisis posed by Covid-19 and its rising death toll. People are getting sick; they are worrying about how to stay safe, access care, look after loved ones or stay in work.

But culture, even during the most extraordinary of times, should not be overlooked. Rather, it should be embraced as means for respite, escape and nourishment. For a brief moment, you can lose yourself in the brushstrokes of a centuries-old painting or feel completely immersed at a live concert. 

At a time when misinformation, polarization and blatant hate are particularly confounding, culture can be humanizing and educational. It's an alternative means by which to digest an increasingly complex and anxiety-fueled world.

Read the whole story here.

11:26 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

In the past week, global coronavirus cases nearly doubled. And there are now twice as many deaths

Israeli scientist Katya Levitski conducts tests on the coronavirus at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, a segment of which will be dedicated to receiving patients suffering from coronavirus, on March 19, in Tel Aviv, Israel.
Israeli scientist Katya Levitski conducts tests on the coronavirus at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, a segment of which will be dedicated to receiving patients suffering from coronavirus, on March 19, in Tel Aviv, Israel. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images

More than 300,000 people are infected with coronavirus around the world, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University (JHU). That's a huge jump in the numbers.

One week ago, JHU was reporting 156,396 confirmed cases.

Meanwhile, the number of deaths from Covid-19 has more than doubled from one week ago, when there were 5,833 deaths. Today, there are nearly 13,000, according to JHU.

10:17 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

Coronavirus is the most severe crisis since World War II, says Italian Prime Minister

From CNN's Valentina DiDonato in Rome

A girl watches Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announce the shut down of all non-essential production activities on March 21, in Rome, Italy.
A girl watches Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announce the shut down of all non-essential production activities on March 21, in Rome, Italy. Franco Origlia/Getty Images

Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced that all "non essential factories" must close as Italy faces "the most severe crisis since WWII."

That restriction applies to any factories not involved in producing food or medical equipment.

Speaking via Facebook live Saturday, Conte announced that the more severe measures are necessary due to the increasing number of coronavirus deaths.

More than 47,000 people have been infected in Italy, and more than 4,000 people have died.

“The death of many of our citizens is a pain that we deal with everyday. The deaths we continue to hear of are not just numbers, they are people," he said.

All pharmacies, food stores, financial services and public transportation will continue to remain open in Italy, Conte said.

"(The measure) will allow us to return to our factories, our piazzas, hugging our friends again. We do this because we love Italy.”

10:17 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

Bolivians should be at home "24 hours a day," the country's interim president says

From CNN’s Taylor Barnes in Atlanta.

Military armored vehicles patrol the streets during a quarantine in El Alto, Bolivia, on Friday.
Military armored vehicles patrol the streets during a quarantine in El Alto, Bolivia, on Friday. Juan Karita/AP

Bolivia has announced a nationwide, 14-day "total quarantine" starting Sunday, according to Bolivian state media agency ABI.

The country's interim president, Jeanine Áñez, said Bolivians should “be at home 24 hours a day” and that only one person per family can leave at a time to go shopping. Public and private transport will be suspended.

Still operating: Pharmacies, hospitals, and health centers will remain open as normal, she said. Permits will be given to employees in sectors that remain open.

Questions over election: On Saturday, the Bolivian electoral tribunal issued a notice on its website saying that the quarantine order impedes the body from carrying out preparatory activities ahead of May 3 elections.

The tribunal said that political groups and authorities should work together to decide on a “new date” that takes into account “scientific evaluations based on serious estimates about the probably evolution of the pandemic.”

An interim government has ruled Bolivia since former President Evo Morales fled the country following allegations of fraud in an October vote that would have given him a fourth term in office. Morales has said he was the victim of a coup.

10:44 p.m. ET, March 21, 2020

If you're just joining us, here's what's been happening over the past few hours

Over the past few hours, the number of global coronavirus infections passed 300,000. At least 12,944 have died. Here's what's been happening:

  • Italy closes non-essential factories: Factories not involved in producing food or medical equipment must shut, the Italian Prime Minister said, adding that the country is facing "the most severe crisis since WWII."
  • Spain braces for hard days ahead: Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez asked Spaniards on Saturday to remain strong, saying the worst is yet to come. Spain has more than 19,000 cases.
  • Foreign citizens trapped in Peru: The US Embassy in Lima says it has chartered flights to get US citizens out of the South American country.
  • Kuwait imposes curfew: The country's Deputy Premier and Interior Minister Anas Al-Saleh announced an 11-hour curfew starting 5pm Sunday, local time.
  • Bolivia announces strict quarantine rules: The country has imposed a 14-day, "total quarantine" starting Sunday. All Bolivians should be at home 24 hours a day, and only one person per family can leave at a time to go shopping.
  • Chile announces first coronavirus death: Chile's first death is an 82-year-old who suffered from other health conditions.