March 30 coronavirus news

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7:16 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

Slight decrease in Spain's daily coronavirus deaths, numbers show

From Max Ramsay in London and Ingrid Formanek in Spain

Mortuary employees carry the coffin of a coronavirus victim during a burial at the Fuencarral cemetery in Madrid, on March 29.
Mortuary employees carry the coffin of a coronavirus victim during a burial at the Fuencarral cemetery in Madrid, on March 29. Baldesca Samper/AFP/Getty Images

There have been another 812 deaths in Spain from coronavirus, according to data from the past 24 hours. The numbers, released by the Spanish Health Ministry, show a smaller increase in daily fatalities than previously seen in the past two days. 

Spain has recorded a total of 7,340 deaths.

There are 61,075 active or current cases in the country -- an increase of 3,515 cases in the past 24 hours, with the number of active cases now well below what it was last week.

2,071 people recovered in the past 24 hours to make a total of 16,780, according to Health Ministry figures.

Officials warn ICUs near capacity: The number of new patients requiring ICU treatment, at 324 in the past 24 hours, was also slightly lower. However, Spanish Health Ministry officials have been warning that ICUs are near capacity, with the total number of patients requiring ICU treatment now at 5,231.

7:08 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

Zaandam and Rotterdam cruise ships cross Panama Canal

From CNNE’s Daniel Silva Fernandez in Miami. Alert written by Hira Humayun in Atlanta.

Holland America's cruise ship Zaandam navigates through the Panama Canal on March 29.LUIS ACOSTA/AFP via Getty Images)
Holland America's cruise ship Zaandam navigates through the Panama Canal on March 29.LUIS ACOSTA/AFP via Getty Images) Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

The Zaandam and Rotterdam cruise ships crossed the Panama Canal late Sunday, according to the Panama Canal Authority.

In a statement, the Canal Authority said the transit was done “under special humanitarian conditions, after receiving authorization from the Ministry of Health.”

Holland America's Zaandam boat and its occupants had been in limbo for weeks awaiting permission to disembark after several South American ports denied the ship's entry.

The Rotterdam, which was there to help transfer passengers without symptoms and provide supplies, also passed through the waterway.

The Canal Authority detailed that extreme sanitary measures were taken for the transit of both vessels, including the use of the new locks to minimize the number of workers involved in the operation.

Passengers with flu-like symptoms: Holland America's Zaandam cruise ship now has 179 people with flu-like symptoms and four deaths on board, according to a statement from Holland America Sunday. 

The company released a statement last week confirming two individuals on board have tested positive for coronavirus.  

6:47 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

First coronavirus treatment test results due at end of week, says French minister

From Ya Chun Wang and Benjamin Berteau in Paris

The first test results for various coronavirus treatments will be made available later this week, the French Minister of Research Frédérique Vidal said Monday.

The clinical trials of four possible treatments began a week ago, and involve more than 3,000 volunteers across Europe.

According to France’s National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), the trials are analyzing the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic options for patients within a controlled timeframe.

The four treatments being tested are:
Remdesivir, which was used to treat Ebola
Lopinavir-Ritonavir, known as an anti-HIV treatment
Hydroxychloroquine, known for treating malaria.
and interferon-beta
6:40 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

Tokyo 2020 Olympic head expects decision for new dates later this week

From CNN’s Yoko Wakatsuki in Tokyo

Tokyo 2020 organization committee president Yoshiro Mori said he expects International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach to call with the new date for the postponed Olympics within the week.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Bach last week agreed to postpone the Olympics until 2021.

The IOC had been facing mounting pressure to delay the Games, which were originally scheduled to take place from July 24 to August 9, amid the novel coronavirus outbreak.

Mori made the remarks at the beginning of the first Executive Board meeting of Tokyo 2020 since the postponement was announced.

Tokyo 2020 organization committee president Yoshiro Mori, center, speaks during the Executive Board Meeting in Tokyo, Japan, on March 30.
Tokyo 2020 organization committee president Yoshiro Mori, center, speaks during the Executive Board Meeting in Tokyo, Japan, on March 30. Issei Kato/Pool/AP

Two possibilities for the games: Organizing committee CEO Toshiro Muto said that the Executive Board discussed two possibilities for the games - in spring or summer of 2021 - but denied there was any discussion on a specific starting date.

Muto said the postponement might mean the same locations are reserved twice, resulting in "considerable" amount of additional costs. He added Tokyo 2020 will continue discussions with the IOC on any final decisions.

7:19 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

Hungarian parliament to vote on whether Orban can rule by decree

From CNN's Stephanie Halasz

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban gives a press conference with other leaders in Prague, Czech Republic, on March 4.
Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban gives a press conference with other leaders in Prague, Czech Republic, on March 4. Michal Cizek/AFP/Getty Images

The Hungarian parliament will Monday vote on whether to allow Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban to rule by decree because of the coronavirus. 

Parts of Monday's vote would include the possibility of a parliamentary suspension, punishing journalists for what the government deems to be inaccurate reporting and heavier punishment for violating quarantine regulations.

During the rule by decree, no elections or referendums could take place, the proposed legislation says.

“We cannot react quickly if there are debates and lengthy legislative and law-making procedures. And in times of crisis and epidemic, the ability to respond rapidly can save lives," Prime Minister Viktor Orban said on Hungarian national Kossuth radio last week.

"The Government is not asking for anything extraordinary: it is asking for the ability to rapidly enact certain measures. We don’t want to enact measures that the government has no general right to enact: we simply want to do so swiftly,” he added.

Warnings from human rights group:

Amnesty International has warned against the move. 

David Vig, Amnesty International’s Hungary Director, said: “This bill would create an indefinite and uncontrolled state of emergency and give Viktor Orban and his government carte blanche to restrict human rights. This is not the way to address the very real crisis that has been caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.”

The vote needs a two thirds majority of Hungarian parliamentarians present in the chamber. There are 199 MPs altogether, and the ruling block of Fidesz and the Christian Democrats KDNP have 133 MPs.

Here's when things could happen: The legislation would have to be signed by first the President of the Hungarian Parliament and then the President of Hungary, Janos Ander. This could happen as early as midnight Monday into Tuesday, a spokesman for the Hungarian parliament said.

6:24 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

Boris Johnson's advisor self isolates after showing coronavirus symptoms

From CNN's Luke McGee in London

Dominic Cummings arrives at Downing Street on Friday, March 27.
Dominic Cummings arrives at Downing Street on Friday, March 27. Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images

A top advisor to the British Prime Minister is self-isolating after showing symptoms of the coronavirus, an official spokesperson for the prime minister told CNN.

Dominic Cummings was seen running out of 10 Downing Street on Friday after Boris Johnson tested positive for the virus.

READ MORE: How can Boris Johnson run the UK while suffering from coronavirus?

6:08 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

It's just gone 6 a.m. in New York. Here's the latest from around the world

Time Square is pictured in New York on March 29.
Time Square is pictured in New York on March 29. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

There are at least 139,733 cases of coronavirus in the U.S. as of 6 am ET Monday, according to CNN's tally of US cases that are detected and tested through US public health systems. At least 2,429 people have died in total in the US from coronavirus. 

New York approaches grim milestone: The state of New York is approaching 1,000 deaths, while the states of Hawaii and Wyoming have yet to report any deaths. 

Trump extends federal social distancing guidelines to April 30: Americans will be encouraged to avoid leaving their houses and keep working from home, as infections rise across the country. "The better you do, the faster this whole nightmare will end," President Donald Trump said Sunday.

Up to 100,000 people could die of virus, expert says: The coronavirus could infect more than a million Americans and kill up to 100,000 people in the country, Dr Anthony Fauci, a leading member of the US coronavirus taskforce, told reporters Sunday. "What we’re trying to do is not to let that happen," he said.

A message of 'Keep Calm And Work From Home' by artist Mike Dicks is projected onto a wall of a church in Brighton & Hove, England, on March 29.
A message of 'Keep Calm And Work From Home' by artist Mike Dicks is projected onto a wall of a church in Brighton & Hove, England, on March 29. Mike Hewitt/Getty Images

And from around the world:

Italy is on the verge of 100,000 cases: The coronavirus is spreading rapidly across Europe, with the worst affected countries still Italy, Spain and Germany. With more than 97,000 cases of the virus, Italy is likely to soon become the second country in the world to break the 100,000 mark after the United States.

First royal coronavirus death: Spain’s María Teresa of Bourbon-Parma has become the first royal to die from coronavirus, according to a statement from her brother Prince Sixto Enrique. The Princess, a distant cousin of Spain's King Felipe, was 86 and died in Paris on Thursday, her brother said.

Moscow goes into quarantine: From Monday, the Russian capital will impose a citywide quarantine on all residents regardless of age. People will not be able to leave their homes except to get groceries or medical help.

UK coronavirus outbreak showing signs of slowing, according to an epidemiologist: The coronavirus outbreak in the UK is showing early signs of slowing, according to Neil Ferguson, a professor of mathematical biology at Imperial College London, who said the development of an antibody test will be “critical” to getting more accurate data on the extent of the outbreak.

7:18 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

Germany has twice as many vacant ICU beds as Italy has ICU beds in total

From CNN's Fred Pleitgen in Berlin

Hospital beds are pictured in a newly opened intensive care unit at the Vivantes Humboldt Clinic in Berlin, Germany, on March 26.
Hospital beds are pictured in a newly opened intensive care unit at the Vivantes Humboldt Clinic in Berlin, Germany, on March 26. Kay Nietfeld/picture alliance/Getty Images

Germany has almost twice as many vacant intensive care (ICU) beds as Italy‘s entire number of ICU beds, the country's health minister Jens Spahn said in an interview with Germany‘s public broadcaster ZDF.  

Germany has the highest number of ICU beds in Europe and is looking to double that number, Spahn said.

“Around half of Germany’s intensive care beds are vacant over the whole of Germany. We are preparing ourselves as best we can for what might happen next,“ Spahn said.
“And if I may add this: In Germany there are almost twice as many intensive care beds vacant as Italy has intensive care beds in total.”

Germany has among the highest number of coronavirus cases worldwide, but a fairly low death toll so far. German virologists believe that is the result of early and extensive testing as well as the widespread availability of intensive care capacities. Patients from hard hit European countries are being flown to Germany for treatment.

5:40 a.m. ET, March 30, 2020

A Spanish princess has become the first royal to die from coronavirus

From CNN's Max Ramsay in London and Tim Lister in Spain

Princess María Teresa of Bourbon-Parma attends a presentation of her book "Les bourbon Parme, une famille engagée dans l'histoire" in Parma, Italy, on September 27, 2014.
Princess María Teresa of Bourbon-Parma attends a presentation of her book "Les bourbon Parme, une famille engagée dans l'histoire" in Parma, Italy, on September 27, 2014. Albert Nieboer/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Spain’s María Teresa of Bourbon-Parma has become the first royal to die from coronavirus, according to a statement from her brother Prince Sixto Enrique.

The Princess, a distant cousin of Spain's King Felipe, was 86 and died in Paris on Thursday, her brother said.

A funeral was held in Madrid on Friday.

Other royals with coronavirus: Prince Charles, the Queen's son and the first in line to the British throne, has also tested positive for coronavirus and is now self-isolating in Scotland.

According to a statement last week from Clarence House, he was displaying mild symptoms but was otherwise in good health.