April 3 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Ben Westcott, Adam Renton, Rob Picheta, Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 8:02 a.m. ET, April 4, 2020
134 Posts
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7:19 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

United States Tennis Association says people should not be playing tennis right now

From CNN's Jill Martin

A locked gate and sign warns residents that the tennis courts are closed due to coronavirus health and safety measures in Bluemont Park, Arlington, Virginia, on March 25.
A locked gate and sign warns residents that the tennis courts are closed due to coronavirus health and safety measures in Bluemont Park, Arlington, Virginia, on March 25. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

The United States Tennis Association (USTA) said it believes that when it comes to playing tennis, "it is in the best interest of society to take a collective pause from playing the sport we love."

"Medical advisors believe there is the possibility that the virus responsible for COVID-19 could be transmitted through common sharing and handling of tennis balls, gate handles, benches, net posts and even court surfaces," the USTA statement said Friday.
7:08 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

There are at least 273,880 coronavirus cases in the US

A medical worker transports a patient at Mount Sinai in New York on April 1.
A medical worker transports a patient at Mount Sinai in New York on April 1. Mary Altaffer/AP

There are at least 273,880 cases of coronavirus in the US and 7,077 people have died, according to Johns Hopkins University's tally of cases in the country.

So far on Friday, 28,667 new cases and 1,094 deaths have been reported, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins. 

The total includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as all repatriated cases.

Wyoming is the only state not reporting a death from coronavirus.

7:06 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

Trump defends his administration, says it was prepared for pandemics

From CNN's Allie Malloy

Alex Brandon/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

When asked by CNN’s Jim Acosta about the level of preparedness for a pandemic like Covid-19, President Trump said while he knew pandemics were “one of the worst things that could happen ... most people thought it wouldn’t and most people didn’t understand the severity of it.”

Trump was responding to Acosta's question about Department of Health and Human Services Sec. Alex Azar saying in April 2019 that a “pandemic flu” is what kept him up most at night.

Trump said he didn't think Azar “was speaking about a specific pandemic,” adding, “I always knew that pandemics are one of the worst things that could happen.”

“Most people thought it wouldn’t and most people didn’t understand the severity of it,” Trump said. “I assume he was talking about the possibility.”

When pressed by Acosta on why the administration doesn’t have enough PPE supplies, Trump blamed it on previous administration, and once again repeated the false claim that the Obama administration left the military with no ammunition.

Read more about Azar's comments last year from CNN's KFile.

6:46 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

Missouri governor issues statewide stay-at-home-order

Gov. Mike Parson delivers the State of the State address on January 15 in Jefferson City, Missouri.
Gov. Mike Parson delivers the State of the State address on January 15 in Jefferson City, Missouri. Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson on Friday issued a statewide stay-at-home order effective Monday, April 6 until Friday, April 24, 2020.

The order stated individuals living in Missouri must avoid leaving their homes or places of residence unless necessary.

Like many state’s stay-at-home orders, it does not prohibit people from going out for “essential services,” such as grocery stores, gas stations, banks or outdoor recreation, as long as precautions are taken and social distancing requirements are met.

Most US states and DC have some kind of stay-at-home order in place.

6:29 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

Kentucky governor says buying PPE supplies for the state is "really hard"

From CNN's Rebekah Riess

Gov. Andy Beshear speaks during a media conference at the state Capitol in Frankfort, Kentucky on March 29.
Gov. Andy Beshear speaks during a media conference at the state Capitol in Frankfort, Kentucky on March 29. Ryan C. Hermens/Lexington Herald-Leader via AP

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said his state has limited personal protective equipment.

"We try to buy. It’s really hard," he said. "The federal government buys most all of it.”

He said that while the state is trying to manufacture PPE, he also asked residents of his state to donate any available PPE supplies.

6:23 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

NYC Mayor says more than 100 federal personnel have been sent to city to help with rising deaths

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Friday that he has had extensive conversations with Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Department of Defense on how to respond to the growing number of deaths in NYC.

De Blasio said more than 100 federal personnel, including members of the military, have been sent to NYC with necessary equipment to “help deal with this crisis on the mortuary side.”

De Blasio also said they will hire more personnel as needed to “address this very painful reality.”

6:17 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

CDC officials felt "pressured" to draft mask recommendations

From CNN's Nick Valencia

Some public health experts at the US Centers for Disease Control felt "pressured" by the White House to draft recommendations that all Americans wear masks or facial coverings while in public, according to a senior federal health official involved in discussions. 

A source told CNN the "CDC was under intense pressure to do this quickly." 

"The CDC would not have gone this direction if not for the White House," the senior official told CNN. "We would have tried more to understand about asymptomatic transmission. We would have done more studies if we had more time." 

"It was more than we were comfortable with, the source added. "Things were done very fast. It's a credibility risk to the agency. It's not fabulous for credibility. There is a real worry that this will provide a false sense of security to the public. Also, up until now the CDC has been telling people it's okay not to wear a mask, and it's going to be recommended that we do. It runs the risk of confusing the public."

6:20 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

Trump on national stay-home order: "I leave it up the governors"

From CNN's Sarah Westwood 

Alex Brandon/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump again signaled his resistance to issuing a national stay-at-home order to slow the spread of coronavirus, despite comments from Dr. Anthony Fauci this week questioning why such an order has not been issued for all states.

The majority of states have issued orders for their residents to stay in their homes, but the federal government has not mandated people do so.

“I leave it up to the governors,” Trump said at the coronavirus task force briefing.

“I guess we’re close to 90 percent anyway,” Trump said of the number of people mandated to stay home. At least 41 states and the District of Columbia have issued stay-at-home orders.

“States that we’re talking about are not in jeopardy,” Trump said, referring to the handful of states that have not yet issued these orders.

“I like that from the standpoint of governing, and even from the standpoint of our Constitution,” the President said of his inclination to allow states to make their own decisions about ordering people not to leave their houses.

The federal government has issued guidance recommending that people stay home to the extent possible and avoid gathering in groups larger than 10.

 Watch:

6:15 p.m. ET, April 3, 2020

US marks record for most new coronavirus deaths reported in a single day

From CNN's Keith Allen

Medical personnel remove a body from the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center to refrigerated containers parked outside, on April 2 in Brooklyn, New York.
Medical personnel remove a body from the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center to refrigerated containers parked outside, on April 2 in Brooklyn, New York. Mary Altaffer/AP

The US coronavirus death toll reached 7,077 on Friday afternoon, according to Johns Hopkins University. The increase of 1,094 deaths today is the most number of deaths in a single day.

The previous record for the most new coronavirus deaths added in a single day as reported by CNN was 946 on Wednesday.