April 10 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Jenni Marsh, Rob Picheta, Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 0138 GMT (0938 HKT) April 11, 2020
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12:34 p.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Connecticut governor to extend social distancing measures at least through May 20

From CNN's Rashard Rose 

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont said he plans to sign an executive order Friday extending previously enacted closures, social distancing and safety measures until at least May 20. 

"This is no doubt a difficult situation, but I cannot stress enough that these actions are saving lives by staying home." Lamont tweeted. “While data is starting to show a flattening of the curve, we're not out of the woods. Returning to normal too soon will have too many negative consequences.” 

Connecticut has 9,784 confirmed coronavirus cases and 380 deaths, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University.

Read Lamont's tweet:

12:35 p.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Oklahoma governor reminds people that social gathering limits apply on Easter

From CNN's Hollie Silverman

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt answers questions during a news conference at Oklahoma's Strategic National Stockpile warehouse in Oklahoma City on April 7.
Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt answers questions during a news conference at Oklahoma's Strategic National Stockpile warehouse in Oklahoma City on April 7. Sue Ogrocki/AP

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt has reminded residents of the order limiting gatherings of people to 10 or less applies during Easter.

Stitt said during a press conference Friday that he would be watching an Easter church service at his home with his family on Sunday and encouraged others to do the same.

The state's social distancing appears to be working, Stitt said, but residents need to continue to follow executive orders. 

"We are flattening the curve in Oklahoma," Stitt said.

Oklahoma has 1,686 confirmed coronavirus cases and 80 deaths, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University.

12:11 p.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Boris Johnson has been able to go on "short walks" at hospital

From CNN's Luke McGee in London 

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks about the government's response to the novel coronavirus outbreak during a news conference at 10 Downing Street on March 22.
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks about the government's response to the novel coronavirus outbreak during a news conference at 10 Downing Street on March 22. Ian Vogler/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been able to go on short walks, between periods of rest, "as part of the care he is receiving to aid his recovery," a Downing Street spokesperson said on Friday. 

“He has spoken to his doctors and thanks the whole clinical team for the incredible care he has received," the spokesperson said.

“His thoughts are with those affected by this terrible disease,” the spokesperson added.

Last night, Downing Street said Johnson was moved from intensive care back to the ward at St. Thomas' Hospital in London, where he will receive close monitoring during the early phase of his recovery from coronavirus.

12:07 p.m. ET, April 10, 2020

New York governor: US needs to look at other countries to learn about "second wave" of virus

From CNN's Elizabeth Joseph

Reopening the economy too soon could lead to a second wave of coronavirus, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

The US should look at other countries that have gone through the "reopening process" and learn when thinking about a potential "second wave" of coronavirus, he said.

 "When you take just a cursory review, you see caution signs," Cuomo said, referencing China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Italy.
12:14 p.m. ET, April 10, 2020

New York governor: "What we do today will determine the infection rate" days from now

From CNN's Adrienne Vogt

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said while New York is flattening the coronavirus curve overall, the current trajectory depends on people keeping social distancing guidelines. 

“There is no natural trajectory. The trajectory is the trajectory that we create by our actions. The natural trajectory would see that line continue to go up,” he said in his daily news briefing. 

Cuomo stressed that “we have to stay the course” to keep slowing the spread of coronavirus. 

“What we do today will determine the infection rate two or three days from now,” he said.

Cuomo said that the unprecedented nature of the coronavirus made projection models difficult to determine, and in turn, hard to put policies in place based on those models. 

“None of these projections were in any way comforting to us. The actual curve is much, much lower than any of them projected,” he said.

Watch more:

12:14 p.m. ET, April 10, 2020

New York governor says reopening the state will be a "gradual, phased process"

National Guard troops listen as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at the Javits Center in New York City on March 27.
National Guard troops listen as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at the Javits Center in New York City on March 27. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said reopening for business in the state is "going to be a gradual phased process, and it's going to be reliant on testing."

"First of all, the key to reopening is going to be testing. I've said that from day one. It's not going to be a light switch where you flip this economy like you flip a light switch," Cuomo said. 

He added that means testing in the state "on a scale that we have not done before," which includes ramping up more testing for antibodies.

11:50 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

New York governor: We're "cautiously optimistic" that infection rate is slowing

At least 777 people across New York died from coronavirus yesterday, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. That's down from 799 the day before.

In total, 7,844 people have died from coronavirus in the state, the governor said.

While the state continues to lose a "tremendous number of lives," Cuomo said he's "cautiously optimistic" that the infection rate is slowing.

Cuomo said the change in ICU admissions is "a negative number" today — the first time since the coronavirus pandemic started.

"That means there are fewer people in the intensive care units statewide than there were," he explained.

Watch more:

11:31 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

Vermont governor extends emergency declaration until May 15

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott announced today he is extending the state's emergency declaration and all corresponding directives until May 15.

"We are making big sacrifices to save lives, but we cannot let our foot off the gas just yet. We will continue to watch the trends, and as soon as the data shows a downward trend, we can open the spigot, a quarter turn at a time, to get folks back to work in a way that’s responsible and safe," Scott said in a Facebook post. 
11:30 a.m. ET, April 10, 2020

US federal government plans to buy $2 billion worth of ventilators to distribute to states

From CNN's Katelyn Polantz

The US Department of Health and Human Services is planning on buying $2 billion worth of ventilators for its strategic national stockpile and will distribute the needed medical equipment to states, a department spokesperson said on Friday. 

The ventilator deals are meant "to ensure we never have a shortage of ventilators," the spokesperson said.

The pledge comes on the heels of HHS announcing contracts this week with GM and Philips. Those two agreements promise 73,000 ventilators to the federal agency's stockpile this year, for a total price of about $1.14 billion. 

HHS said this week it's planning on awarding more contracts like the GM and Philips deals for more ventilators. The HHS office that runs the stockpile has also encouraged state governments to use and to try to tap into their own supplies of ventilators. 

"We have been pleased to see states like Oregon, California and Washington step up to do this," the HHS spokesperson said. "Ordering and supplying brand new ventilators takes time; states and hospitals should do what they can today to get resources where they are needed most."