April 11 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Brett McKeehan, Amy Woodyatt, Fernando Alfonso III and Amir Vera, CNN

Updated 1710 GMT (0110 HKT) December 27, 2020
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3:25 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

If the US stops social distancing in May, forecasts show the coronavirus could rebound in July

Two women practice social distancing while talking in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 4.
Two women practice social distancing while talking in Boston, Massachusetts, on April 4. AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

If the US ends social distancing and other coronavirus mitigation strategies by May 1, as President Donald Trump has encouraged, case numbers in the country could rebound, officials warned.

The projections are based on new modeling scenarios run by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington that assume social distancing policies will end from next month.

"The risk of rebound is very great," IHME Director Dr. Chris Murray told CNN late Friday.

The projections are based on new modeling scenarios run by IHME that assume social distancing policies will end from next month.

"If we were to stop at the national level May 1st, we're seeing (in models) a return to almost where we are now sometime in July, so a rebound ... Definitely there's a very substantial risk of rebound if we don't wait to the point where most transmission is near zero in each state."

The research center plans to release state-level analyses based on the new models next week, Murray said. 

The warning comes after Trump said he wanted to reopen the country's economy, despite many researchers and medical staff saying it's far too early for such a move.

"I would love to open (the economy). I have not determined anything, the facts are going to determine what I do. But we do want to get the country opened, so important," Trump said at a briefing on Friday.

3:13 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

Africans in China say they have been evicted from their homes as virus fears spark xenophobia

From CNN's Jenni Marsh, Shawn Deng and Nectar Gan

The African community in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou is on edge after widespread accounts were shared on social media of people being left homeless this week, as China's warnings against imported coronavirus cases stoke anti-foreigner sentiment.

In Guangzhou, Africans have been evicted from their homes by landlords and turned away from hotels -- despite many claiming to have no recent travel history or known contact with Covid-19 patients.

CNN interviewed more than two dozen Africans living in Guangzhou, many of whom told of the same experiences: being left without a home, being subject to random testing for Covid-19, and being quarantined for 14 days in their homes, despite having no symptoms or contact with known patients.

Fears of an imported second wave: This comes amid heightened media coverage of the so-called second wave of coronavirus cases, emanating from infections outside China.

Earlier this week, Chinese President Xi Jinping urged authorities to carefully watch for imported cases from ​other countries, state news agency Xinhua reported.

The fears aren't unfounded -- Hong Kong, not far from Guangzhou, has been hit hard by a second wave. At the start of March, there were only 150 cases in the city of 7.5 million, suggesting the crisis had eased. Now it has 990 cases -- and many were imported from overseas.

Yet these imported cases aren't foreign citizens: 90% of China's imported cases are people with Chinese passports, said Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Luo Zhaohui on March 26.

Read more here:

3:02 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

This is what exercise looks like in the age of social distancing

Karate instructor Viki Bell usually teaches at the Seido Karate dojo in Melbourne, Australia, but it closed due to social distancing rules.
Karate instructor Viki Bell usually teaches at the Seido Karate dojo in Melbourne, Australia, but it closed due to social distancing rules.

With lockdowns and movement restrictions in place across the world, people are having to find new ways to exercise.

Viki Bell teaches karate in Melbourne, Australia -- but her dojo is closed because of the country's social distancing rules.

Instead she has started teaching classes virtually, with her students practicing the moves in their own homes on the other side of the camera.

Bell teaching an online class in Melbourne, Australia.
Bell teaching an online class in Melbourne, Australia. Credit: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Julia Basa has used the same strategy. She teaches Zumba -- a mix of dance, pilates and aerobics -- in Melbourne, but lately has had to hold sessions online from her backyard.

Zumba instructor Julia Basa leads an online session from her backyard in Melbourne, Australia, on April 9.
Zumba instructor Julia Basa leads an online session from her backyard in Melbourne, Australia, on April 9. Credit: Robert Cianflone/Getty Images

Other places are getting more creative. One neighborhood in the UK town of Frodsham has started doing daily dance and fitness sessions outdoors -- everyone on the road, following a resident instructor, but carefully standing a number of feet apart to adhere to social distancing criteria.

Neighbors in the town of Frodsham, England, participate in a daily social distance dancing and fitness event on April 4.
Neighbors in the town of Frodsham, England, participate in a daily social distance dancing and fitness event on April 4. Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
2:49 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

Health care workers are using TikTok to keep their spirits up

From CNN's Ashley Vaughan

When the beat drops, these health care workers know it's all about the footwork.

Medical professionals across the country are participating in dance challenges on social media. It's helping them share smiles and blow off steam during the demanding coronavirus pandemic.

In scrubs and swag, nurse Kala Baker lip-syncs and dances in TikTok challenges to hits like "Savage" by Meg Thee Stallion at Mercy Hospital in Springfield, Missouri.

Baker says her challenges, which she films after clocking out, help create solidarity with health care professionals across the country -- especially in states hit hardest by coronavirus. She sees it as a way to "bring joy to a really dark place right now."

"I have never felt more connected with health care workers; we all feel like we are all one big team all over the world," she said. "We are trying to do it together."

Read more here:

2:37 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

If you're just joining us, here are the latest developments

Medical workers at the Brooklyn Hospital Center on April 9 in Brooklyn, New York.
Medical workers at the Brooklyn Hospital Center on April 9 in Brooklyn, New York. John Minchillo/AP

The coronavirus has infected close to 1.7 million people globally, and killed more than 102,000. The US has passed half a million cases, and many other countries are still reporting record numbers of new cases each day.

If you're just joining us, here are the biggest headlines from today:

  • The US breaks half a million: There are now more than 501,000 cases in the US, as well as 18,000 deaths. New York state alone has more cases than any other country in the world.
  • Uruguay cruise: Passengers from Australia and New Zealand on the cruise ship Greg Mortimer are being evacuated and flown home. Nearly 60% of those on the ship, docked in Uruguay, are infected.
  • Deaths skyrocket in Brazil: The number of coronavirus deaths has almost tripled in a week. However President Jair Bolsonaro has continuously rejected containment measures, saying the financial impact is worse than the pandemic itself.
  • South Korea isn't kidding around: If you break quarantine rules, you have to wear a tracking bracelet. The new measures begin in two weeks.
  • Companies adjust: Tyson Foods is using walk-through infrared body temperature scanners at production plants after employees tested positive. Meanwhile, Boeing is resuming operations in some US sites after temporary closures.
2:21 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

Some countries are reopening. Here's how they're doing it

From CNN's Laura Smith-Spark

People in the Czech Republic can now shop at hardware and bicycle stores, play tennis and go swimming. Austria plans to reopen smaller shops after Easter. Denmark will reopen kindergartens and schools from next week if coronavirus cases remain stable, and children in Norway will return to kindergarten a week later.

These nations are among the first in the West to start feeling their way out of the limits on daily life imposed by governments to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

How did they get here?

The countries preparing to ease restrictions had something in common: they were among the first in Europe to implement lockdowns or severe social distancing measures, and rapidly scaled up coronavirus testing, said Dr. Peter Drobac, a global health expert at the Oxford Saïd Business School.

Other countries looking to follow their path and avoid a second wave need to meet three general criteria, he said:

  1. They need to have "bent the curve" and seen a consistent reduction in the number of new cases.
  2. Their health care systems need to be able to cope without resorting to crisis measures such as emergency hospitals.
  3. They need a system in place for mass testing, contact tracing and isolation, so that sick people can be isolated early before they infect others.

Read the full story here:

2:10 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

If you live in Beverly Hills, your face has to be covered when you go outside

A man rides a scooter past a shuttered cinema in Beverly Hills, California, on March 18.
A man rides a scooter past a shuttered cinema in Beverly Hills, California, on March 18. Mario Tama/Getty Images

Everyone in the Californian city of Beverly Hills must now wear face coverings whenever they go outside.

The order went into effect late Friday local time, and includes essential workers. Face coverings like a scarf, bandana or cloth are required for all outings, including walks through the neighborhood.

Drivers traveling alone or with members of their household don't need to wear face coverings unless they lower their windows to interact with anyone who is not a member of their household.

“We believe this action will help to protect and ultimately save lives,” Mayor Lester Friedman said in a statement. “While we continue to ask our community members to remain at home, those who do go outside and the people they encounter will be safer.”

This differs from the Los Angles County mandate announced by Mayor Eric Garcetti on Tuesday, which does not require residents to wear face coverings while alone outside.

1:52 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

India and Japan both report most coronavirus cases in a single day

A motorist rides through a disinfection tunnel in Chennai, India, on April 5.
A motorist rides through a disinfection tunnel in Chennai, India, on April 5. Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images

As the coronavirus pandemic continues, the situation in early hotspots like China and South Korea is improving as the countries move away from the peak of infection.

However the struggle is intensifying in India and Japan.

India reported its biggest single-day jump in cases yesterday, with 1,035 new cases, the health ministry said Saturday. There were also 40 more deaths.

The national total is now 7,600 cases and 249 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Japan also had its biggest single-day leap in cases, with 658 new cases and six more deaths yesterday.

Tokyo's normally bustling Shinjuku district on April 7.
Tokyo's normally bustling Shinjuku district on April 7. Christopher Jue/Getty Images

It was the fourth day in a row that Japan had set a new peak, and took the national total to 6,717 cases and 105 deaths.

Mainland China reported 46 new cases yesterday -- 42 of which were imported from abroad.

There were also three deaths and 34 new asymptomatic cases, which are counted separately from confirmed cases.

The country now has 81,953 cases and 3,339 deaths from the coronavirus, according to the National Health Commission. Of those total cases, 77,525 have recovered and been discharged from the hospital.

South Korea reported 30 new cases yesterday, bringing the national total to 10,450, according to data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Johns Hopkins University.

1:35 a.m. ET, April 11, 2020

Two more crew on US Navy hospital ship test positive

From CNN's Jon Passantino

The USNS Mercy in Los Angeles on March 27.
The USNS Mercy in Los Angeles on March 27. AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill

Two more crew members on the USNS Mercy hospital ship docked in Los Angeles have tested positive for the coronavirus -- taking the total to three, the US Navy confirmed on Friday.

The ship is being used to treat non-coronavirus patients to help ease the burden on hospitals.

"The Covid-positive crew members are currently isolated off-ship, and will continue to self-monitor," Navy spokesman Andrew Bertucci said.
"The ship is following protocols and taking every precaution to ensure the health and safety of all crew members and patients on board."

The cases will not affect the ability for USNS Mercy to receive patients, Bertucci told CNN.