April 19 coronavirus news

By Helen Regan, Jenni Marsh, Laura Smith-Spark, Fernando Alfonso III and Amir Vera, CNN

Updated 10:02 p.m. ET, April 19, 2020
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12:23 a.m. ET, April 19, 2020

US reports more than 33,400 new coronavirus cases in one day

From CNN's Alta Spells

There are at least 734,969 coronavirus cases in the Unites States, according to Johns Hopkins University's tally.

At least 38,903 people have died.

On Saturday, 33,494 new cases were reported and 1,849 people died, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.   

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other U.S. territories, as well as all repatriated cases.

CNN’s map, which uses JHU data, refreshes every 15 minutes:

 

12:15 a.m. ET, April 19, 2020

Charles Barkley: We need to take better care of our health and bodies

CNN
CNN

Retired basketball player Charles Barkley said on CNN's "The Color of Covid" that the coronavirus pandemic, which is disproportionately impacting African Americans, is showing the need for better health care and better diets.

"We as black people, we have to accept the fact there is systematic racism. But that does not give you a reason to go out and be overweight, have diabetes," Barkley said.

"We got to eat better, we need better access to health care, we need better access to being able to work out, and things like that. But unless we get better health care which is part of the system, unless we learn to work out better and take better care of our bodies, we are always going to be at a disadvantage," he said.

On learning from coronavirus: "There have been people in our community begging us for years to take this seriously so I think this virus is trying to teach us about wellness and about oneness and I think it's been there we just got a listen to it," he said.

Not an option for everyone: "There are some people who don't have the information that we have, there are some people who have sat down in ghettos, and they don't get the information, and sadly they don't have access to that. They live in food ghettos so I don't want to be hard on everyone and I don't want to blame people," Barkley said.

Watch more:

11:52 p.m. ET, April 18, 2020

China reports 16 new coronavirus cases, the lowest one-day tally in a month

From Anna Kam and Alex Lin in Hong Kong

Volunteers spray disinfectant in the compounds of a school in Weifang, China, on April 12.
Volunteers spray disinfectant in the compounds of a school in Weifang, China, on April 12. STR/AFP/Getty Images

China reported 16 new confirmed coronavirus cases at the end of day Saturday, according to the country's National Health Commission (NHC), the lowest daily increase since March 17.

No additional deaths were reported.

China has now reported 82,735 cases and 4,632 coronavirus deaths.

Of the total cases, 77,062 have recovered and been discharged from hospital, according to the health commission.

Out of the 16 new cases, nine were imported. Six are related to Heilongjiang Province on China’s northeastern border with Russia. The border area has seen a recent rise in Covid-19 infections.

In a separate count, 44 new asymptomatic infections were reported by the NHC. There are currently 999 asymptomatic cases under medical observation. 

11:34 p.m. ET, April 18, 2020

These statistics show how minority communities are disproportionately impacted by coronavirus

CNN
CNN

On CNN's on "The Color of Covid," anchor Don Lemon shared some stark statistics that show how disproportionately black and brown communities in the United States are being impacted by the coronavirus crisis.

The following is compiled from US states where data could be collected -- just over half.

  • African Americans are dying at two-and-a-half times the rate of Asian Americans, three times higher than Latinos, and 3.6 times higher than whites. 
  • In Michigan, blacks make up nearly half of the death toll but they are only 14% of the population. 
  • In at least eight other states in the Midwest, the South and East, the death rate exceeds the population rate for blacks by more than 20 percentage points. 
  • For Hispanic Americans the death rate is unusually high in the country’s coronavirus epicenter, New York City.

Poverty and healthcare: Minorities make up half of the nation’s uninsured. There is one big reason why: Native Americans, blacks and hispanics are more likely to be in poverty. 

11:12 p.m. ET, April 18, 2020

Hispanic Americans make up a third of New York's deaths

CNN
CNN

CNN correspondent Nick Valencia said on CNN's "The Color of Covid" special that Hispanic Americans are suffering the most in New York City, where the community makes up more than a third of virus-related deaths.

Social economic factors and inequality is at play.

In New York, 34% of the death rate is made up by Latinos, "and that is not even counting undocumented immigrants who may be afraid are showing symptoms are sick and are free to go into the doctor," Valencia said.

The jobs that Latino's have may put the community more at risk of contracting the coronavirus. 

In New York, there are at least 242,424 coronavirus cases and 17,627 deaths.

11:04 p.m. ET, April 18, 2020

For the first time in two months, South Korea reports a single-digit rise in coronavirus cases

From CNN's Sophie Jeong

An employee holds coronavirus testing kits at the Boditech Med Inc. headquarters on April 17, in Chuncheon, South Korea.
An employee holds coronavirus testing kits at the Boditech Med Inc. headquarters on April 17, in Chuncheon, South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

South Korea reported eight new cases of coronavirus on Saturday, according to the South Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The national tally now stands at 10,661.

South Korea had not seen a single digit increase in infections numbers since February 18, according to a CNN calculation of KCDC data. 

Among the eight new cases, five were imported.

Two more deaths were added to the overall count from Saturday, raising the national death toll to 234.

The KCDC said 105 more recovered cases have been discharged from isolation, bringing the national total of recovered cases to 8,042.

10:52 p.m. ET, April 18, 2020

Dr. Regina Benjamin: "Your zip code is a better predictor of your health outcomes than your genetic code"

CNN
CNN

Dr. Regina Benjamin, former US surgeon general under President Barack Obama, joined CNN's "The Color of Covid" special on Sunday.

"When we first started to talk about this disease we said the elderly and those with with underlying conditions were at higher risk. Most people thought of people with cancer, elderly people, people with breathing difficulties. People we did not consider were those with high blood pressure, heart disease, cardiovascular disease, those who smoked," Benjamin said. "What we did not expect is these people would be coming in much faster and would deteriorate faster and died more frequently.

Being prepared in the communities that need it: Benjamin said knowing this, there is a need to be in the communities that are most affected with these conditions.

"The research shows us that certain things cause these health disparities. Things like: we know that our financial health is directly related to our physical health. We know education is just as important for our health. The death rate is two-and-a-half times that of a person who does not have a high school diploma as it is for a person who has 13 years or more," she said.

"Your zip code is a better predictor of your health outcomes than your genetic code," Benjamin said.

Need for better public policies: Benjamin said she hoped the country would come out of the pandemic with better public policies.

"It's not just people in African American populations and hispanic populations. It's people in rural areas and my communities. We have the same types of problems with high blood pressure and diabetes. We smoke too much. All of those things that lead to cardiovascular disease are in rural communities and we will see the same thing. It’s poor people," she said.

Watch:

10:37 p.m. ET, April 18, 2020

More than 38,800 people have died from coronavirus in the US

From CNN's Hollie Silverman

There are at least 734,552 coronavirus cases in the Unites States, according to Johns Hopkins University's tally.

At least 38,835 people have died.

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other U.S. territories, as well as all repatriated cases.

CNN’s map, which uses JHU data, refreshes every 15 minutes:

10:26 p.m. ET, April 18, 2020

Laura Bush and Michelle Obama appear from home on Global Citizen TV concert

From CNN's Kelly Mena

On Saturday night, former first ladies Laura Bush and Michelle Obama appeared on the Global Citizen "One World: Together At Home" televised concert from their own homes, sharing messages of thanks and hope.

"Laura and I want to express our overwhelming gratitude to the medical professionals, first responders and so many others on the front lines risking their lives on our behalf," said Obama. 

"And we're thankful for our pharmacists, the veterinarians, the police officers, the sanitation workers, and those of you working in grocery stores or delivering food or supplies to our homes. You're the fabric of our country and your strength will carry us through this crisis," said Bush. 

Obama finished the message off by saying:

"The coming days will not be easy, but this global family of ours is strong. We will continue to be here for one another and we will get through this crisis. Together. Thank you." 

The event was organized to raise funds for the Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund for the World Health Organization.

Read the full story here.