April 25 coronavirus news

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9:45 p.m. ET, April 24, 2020

The US will send ventilators to Ecuador, El Salvador and Indonesia, Trump says  

From CNN's Nikki Carvajal

US President Donald Trump addresses the media at the White House on April 24.
US President Donald Trump addresses the media at the White House on April 24. Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

The United States will send ventilators to Ecuador, El Salvador and Indonesia, President Donald Trump tweeted Friday.

"Just spoke to my friend, President Joko Widodo of the Republic of Indonesia. Asking for Ventilators, which we will provide," the President wrote. "Great cooperation between us!"

Trump said he had a "great conversation with President Lenin Moreno" of Ecuador. He added that the US "will be sending them desperately needed Ventilators, of which we have recently manufactured many, and helping them in other ways. They are fighting hard against CoronaVirus!"

Trump also praised El Salvador for helping the US on immigration. 

"Will be helping them with Ventilators, which are desperately needed," Trump wrote. "They have worked well with us on immigration at the Southern Border!"

9:14 p.m. ET, April 24, 2020

UK to start trials of drones delivering medical supplies

The UK government has green-lit trials for drone delivery of medicines and medical equipment, UK Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said at the daily coronavirus briefing on Friday.

Plans were already in motion to use drones to make deliveries in the UK -- but due to the coronavirus crisis, "now we have an urgent need" to fast-track them, he said.

The trials will start next week and carry medical equipment to St Mary's Hospital on the Isle of Wight, off UK's southern coast, Shapps said.

9:46 p.m. ET, April 24, 2020

Indonesia has the world's biggest Muslim population. It just banned holiday travel over Ramadan

From CNN's Masrur Jamaluddin, Sandi Sidhu and Helen Regan

Vehicles drive past a checkpoint during a partial lockdown in Serpong, West Java, Indonesia, on April 24.
Vehicles drive past a checkpoint during a partial lockdown in Serpong, West Java, Indonesia, on April 24. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Indonesia has temporarily banned domestic road, air and sea travel starting Friday to prevent the spread of coronavirus, as millions of Muslims mark the start of the holy month of Ramadan.

What's going on? Indonesia has the largest Muslim population in the world, and tens of millions of people make their way home to celebrate the end of Ramadan each year with families and loved ones, an annual tradition called mudik.

But the country is grappling with rapidly rising numbers of coronavirus infections and there are concerns that the mass migration home for Idul Fitri -- the Indonesian name for Eid al-Fitr, the celebration that marks the end of the month-long Ramadan fast -- will spark further Covid-19 outbreaks.

How bad is the outbreak in Indonesia? In the early stages of the pandemic, Indonesia was a regional outlier, not reporting any Covid-19 cases until early March. Now, the country has the second-worst outbreak in Southeast Asia, behind Singapore.

Indonesia has recorded 8,211 coronavirus cases and 689 people have died, according to government figures. Indonesian President Joko Widodo declared a national public health emergency on March 31 but has not issued a nationwide lockdown.

What is Indonesia doing? To try to prevent the disease spreading further, all holiday travel in the country has been banned, with public transport between major cities suspended from Friday until May 31. Tens of thousands of troops are being deployed at checkpoints to enforce the regulations.

Private vehicles and motorbikes have been banned from traveling in and out of the major cities that are Covid-19 hotspots, known as "red zones." In these places, stricter lockdown measures are in force to contain the virus. The Greater Jakarta area is one such zone, where coronavirus has spread rapidly in the past month.

Read the full story here.

9:47 p.m. ET, April 24, 2020

London police arrest more than 4,000 people for domestic abuse during coronavirus restrictions

From CNN's Milena Veselinovic

London's Metropolitan Police arrested more than 4,000 people for domestic abuse since the restrictions imposed to stop the spread of coronavirus were introduced, the force said in a statement Friday.

"The COVID-19 restrictions and 'stay at home' instruction is vital to managing this public health crisis, but unfortunately it has also left current and potential victims of domestic abuse even more vulnerable and isolated," said Commander Sue Williams, the Met's lead for safeguarding.

She added: "Victims should be assured that they can leave their homes to escape harm or seek help, and they will not be penalized in any way for not maintaining social distancing, or otherwise breaching COVID-19 restrictions. Our prime concern is protecting victims and others who are affected, and bringing offenders to justice."

The background: There have been concerns around the world that coronavirus lockdowns could result in a spike in domestic violence cases. Several American cities have reported increases in domestic violence cases or calls to local hotlines. Similar concerns have been raised in Europe.

9:47 p.m. ET, April 24, 2020

UK will host a global summit to support the development of a Covid-19 vaccine

From CNN's Nada Bashir

Britain's Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab in London on April 23.
Britain's Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab in London on April 23. Frank Augstein/Pool/AP

The United Kingdom will host a summit on June 4 to encourage the international community to “come together” to support the development of a Covid-19 vaccine, Britain's Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab announced Friday.  

“Diseases have no borders, so we must come together to make sure that Gavi [The Vaccine Alliance] is fully funded and its expertise is at the heart of efforts to secure broad access to any COVID-19 vaccine,” Raab tweeted. 

Gavi is an international organization that aims to bring the public and private sectors together to improve access to vaccines.

In a later tweet, the British foreign secretary added that the UK will also co-host the Coronavirus Global Response Summit on May 4 alongside its international partners, including the European Union, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Norway and South Africa. 

“The UK is playing a leading role in efforts to develop a COVID vaccine and better testing. We’re pleased to co-host the Coronavirus Global Response Summit on 4 May with our partners…to develop a vaccine together,” he added. 
9:14 p.m. ET, April 24, 2020

It's 9 a.m. in Hong Kong and 9 p.m. in New York City. Here's the latest on the coronavirus pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has killed more than 195,000 people worldwide. If you're just joining us, here is the latest on the outbreak:

  • Italy's medical workers: At least 150 doctors have died in Italy after contracting coronavirus -- and health care professionals account for about 10% of all infections, according to the Italian Association of Doctors.
  • Global hunt for vaccine: The United Kingdom will host a summit on June 4 to encourage the international community to “come together” to support the development of a Covid-19 vaccine. The World Health Organization has announced the launch of a new effort to accelerate the development of vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Domestic violence: London police have arrested more than 4,000 people for domestic abuse since the restrictions imposed to stop the spread of coronavirus were introduced.
  • Drone delivery: The UK government has green-lit trials for drone delivery of medicines and medical equipment.
  • US sending ventilators: The United States will send ventilators to Ecuador, El Salvador and Indonesia, President Donald Trump tweeted Friday, announcing he spoke with the countries' leaders.
9:14 p.m. ET, April 24, 2020

At least 150 Italian doctors have died from coronavirus

From CNN's Valentina Di Donato and Livia Borghese in Rome

At least 150 doctors have died in Italy after contracting coronavirus, the Italian Association of Doctors said on Friday.

Health care professionals account for about 10% of all infections, the organization said.

A separate Italian health care group, ANAAO, criticized a decree aimed at strengthening the health system, saying it's not good enough.

ANAAO called the measures set out in the Cura Italia decree — which is worth 25 billion euros ($27 billion) and was approved by the government on Friday — "completely disappointing."

"The additional funding provided is not enough to guarantee the remuneration of all the overtime fielded between February and March with generosity and a spirit of sacrifice by the health workers to face the tsunami of patients who poured into hospitals, hitting the health care system that has been under financed for decades," a statement from the organization said.