May 2 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Brett McKeehan, Fernando Alfonso III and Amir Vera, CNN

Updated 11:26 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020
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2:39 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

Michigan governor extends safety measures for grocery stores and pharmacies

From CNN's Elise Hammond

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addresses the state during a speech in Lansing, Michigan, on Friday, May 1.
Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addresses the state during a speech in Lansing, Michigan, on Friday, May 1. Michigan Office of the Governor via AP

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed an executive order today that extends existing safety measures to protect consumers and employees at grocery stores and pharmacies.

The order requires grocery stores and pharmacies to continue following the established guidelines until May 29, according to a news release.

Some of these guidelines include:

  • Customers must wear a face covering when entering a grocery store or pharmacy
  • Grocery stores and pharmacies must allocate at least two hours per week for vulnerable populations to shop safely
  • If an employee tests positive for coronavirus, the business must notify other employees

“We must continue protecting the health and safety of both consumers and employees at our grocery stores and pharmacies, which we rely on more than ever during this unprecedented public health crisis,” Whitmer said.

Food sellers must also continue to follow safety guidelines, including maintaining social distancing and implementing a daily screening process for employees.

4:43 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over 3 US cities to honor health care workers

The Thunderbirds and Blue Angels preform a flyover on May 2 in Baltimore, Maryland.
The Thunderbirds and Blue Angels preform a flyover on May 2 in Baltimore, Maryland. Rob Carr/Getty Images

The US Navy Blue Angels and US Air Force Thunderbirds are honoring frontline health care workers and first responders battling coronavirus with flights on Saturday.

The planes will fly over Baltimore, Washington, DC, and Atlanta today, according to a news release.

“America Strong is a way for both teams to show appreciation to the thousands of doctors, nurses, first responders and essential workers out there serving on the frontline day-in and day-out,” Cmdr. Brian Kesselring, the Blue Angels commanding officer and flight leader for the flyover, said in the release. “This is an extraordinary and unprecedented time but we will get through this. We are all in this together," he added.

Watch:

1:29 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

Turkey lifts export restrictions on some medical equipment

From CNN's Gul Tuysuz

A Turkish military carago plane with medical supplies and protective equipment to combat the coronavirus in the US is unloaded at Andrews Air Force Base on April 28 in Maryland.
A Turkish military carago plane with medical supplies and protective equipment to combat the coronavirus in the US is unloaded at Andrews Air Force Base on April 28 in Maryland. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Turkey has lifted trade restrictions imposed on the export of some medical equipment due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

This equipment includes ventilators, intubation tubes and intensive care unit monitors.

The decision, which also removes the export limitations on disinfectants, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol and hand sanitizing cologne, was announced in the Official Gazette of government regulations on Saturday.

The decision does not lift the pre-approval requirement for personal protective equipment (PPE).

The trade restrictions, which introduced a requirement for pre-approval from the health ministry for export, were imposed in mid-March. 

“The decision to allow their export reflects Turkey’s decreasing need for said devices and chemicals, due to our increasing ability to contain the Coronavirus, and our commitment to helping countries in need," a senior Turkish official said.  

Turkey has delivered PPE and medical equipment to more than 50 countries since the outbreak including donations to the Spain, Italy, United Kingdom and the US. 

1:26 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

Reopening schools is not "as simple as spreading the desks apart," Los Angles superintendent says

From CNN's Elise Hammond

School grounds are empty at the Miguel Contreras Learning Complex on March 19 in Los Angeles, California.
School grounds are empty at the Miguel Contreras Learning Complex on March 19 in Los Angeles, California. David McNew/Getty Images

Austin Beutner, the superintendent of the Los Angles Unified School District, said reopening schools will be complicated because of the number of people who are impacted.

For example, one of the schools in the district has 500 students, Beutner told CNN's Fredricka Whitfield. Those 500 students have siblings who are in schools with about 50,000 more students, who go home to about 200,000 family members, he said.

One school with 500 individuals [is] connected to a quarter million people," Beutner said. "We don't want the quarter million people bringing the virus into the school and the school to spread and be a petri dish to share with the rest of the community."

"It's complicated," he added. "It's not just as simple as spreading the desks apart."

Some background: On Tuesday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom floated the idea of restarting school in late July or early August, saying that "the prospects of an earlier school year are warranted considering the prospect of neglecting our next generation."

Local school officials would develop new protocols for physical education classes and recess at schools, as well as processes to deeply clean and sanitize schools, parks and playgrounds to keep infection rates down, Newsom said when discussing his plan on how to reopen the sate.

1:04 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

About 50% of employees at an Indiana food processing plant tested positive for coronavirus

From CNN’s Jason Morris

A Tyson Fresh Meats plant employee leaves the Logansport, Indiana, plant on Thursday, April 23.
A Tyson Fresh Meats plant employee leaves the Logansport, Indiana, plant on Thursday, April 23. Darron Cummings/AP

About half of the people tested at the Tyson pork processing plant in Logansport, Indiana, have Covid-19.

A spokesperson with the Joint Information Center said of the approximately 2,200 employees at the plant, about 1,900 individuals were tested.

Tyson announced yesterday that the plant will be reopening next week.

“We’ve taken additional precautions to reassure team members that they are returning to a safe environment and have made additional changes to continue supporting them during this global health crisis," Senior Vice-President Todd Neff said in a press release Friday.

Some context: This news comes after President Trump signed an executive order aimed at keeping meat-processing facilities open amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Still, plants across the country are scrambling to balance worker safety with pressure from the federal government to remain operational.

1:04 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

Eurostar will require passengers to wear face coverings

From CNN's Lindsay Isaac

A security member stands near the Eurostar terminal at Gare du Nord in Paris on April 1.
A security member stands near the Eurostar terminal at Gare du Nord in Paris on April 1. Franck Fife/AFP/Getty Images

The high speed train that runs from southern England to Europe by undersea tunnel will require passengers to wear face coverings as of Monday.

“Any type of mask is suitable as long as it effectively covers your nose and mouth,” Eurostar said in a statement. 

Passengers without masks will be refused travel, it adds. 

Eurostar has been running largely reduced service.

12:00 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

New York state will donate 7 million cloth masks to vulnerable communities

New York state will donate 7 million more cloth masks to those most vulnerable to coronavirus, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Saturday during a news conference.

The masks will be given to nursing homes and the poorer communities, Cuomo said.

The governor also announced the state will distribute $25 million to food banks across the region.

Watch:

4:46 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

New York governor: "I'm not going to put dollar signs over human lives"

From CNN's Elise Hammond

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo Source: Governor's Cuomo Office

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo disagrees with people who want to open the economy while the pandemic persists because he refuses to "put dollar signs over human lives."

"I understand people's frustration with the economy not being open. I get it. I want to see the economy open. For myself, for my family, and by the way, the state has a tremendous financial problem," Cuomo said at a press conference Saturday.

Cuomo said that while he understands people have a first amendment right to express their disagreement with his decisions, he said they "have no right to jeopardize my health."

The state will continue to enforce the order that requires New York residents to wear a mask in public when they are unable to social distance.

"The mask is not about your health. The mask is about my health and my children's health and your children's health –– and that's why you have to wear a mask," he said. "I believe it should be enforced because it's reckless, it's irresponsible and it's not about your lives, it's about other people's lives and you don't have a right to do that."

On antibody testing: Of the 15,000 people tested for Covid-19 antibodies, 12.3% of them have tested positive, Cuomo said.

As of May 1, New York City is seeing nearly 20% of the positive cases with the borough of the Bronx seeing the highest percentage according to the governor.

Cuomo went on to announce they are doing antibody testing for transit workers in the New York City region.

4:47 p.m. ET, May 2, 2020

More than 65,000 coronavirus-related deaths have been reported in the US

There has been at least 1,106,373 cases of coronavirus in the US and at least 65,173 deaths, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

As states begin to include “probable deaths” in their counts, so will the university. In the upcoming days, these changes may show as surges of deaths in the United States. 

The totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases and those in the US military, veterans hospitals and federal prisons.