May 12 coronavirus news

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9:59 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Hawaii is considering taking photos of all incoming visitors to enforce quarantine

From CNN’s Andy Rose

A man stands in an empty waiting area at the international airport on April 21 in Honolulu, Hawaii.
A man stands in an empty waiting area at the international airport on April 21 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Caleb Jones/AP

Hawaii may start taking photographs of all incoming visitors, as the state continues to deal with people ignoring its mandatory 14-day quarantine rule. 

“If we know someone has broken quarantine, we (currently) don’t have a photo that we can distribute and have people help us identify who they are," said Gov. David Ige on Monday, speaking in a Facebook forum with the Honolulu Star-Advertiser newspaper.

The state has strictly enforced its quarantine for visitors, even arresting a California couple on their honeymoon who repeatedly ignored warnings to stay in their hotel room last week. 

Repeat violators have been fined and even forced to leave the state, with a local tourist advocacy group sometimes paying the cost of their departure flight.

“Certainly having photos would be helpful,” Ige said. “We’re looking at a number of things that would help us improve the enforcement of the quarantine.”

Read more about Hawaii's quarantine measures:

9:42 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

China reports 1 new imported coronavirus case

From CNN's Vanesse Chan

A student wearing a face mask amid concerns of the coronavirus passes by a propaganda poster on a street that reads "No Panic Trust Science" as she leaves a middle school in Beijing on May 11.
A student wearing a face mask amid concerns of the coronavirus passes by a propaganda poster on a street that reads "No Panic Trust Science" as she leaves a middle school in Beijing on May 11. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

China recorded one new confirmed coronavirus case yesterday, imported from abroad and detected in Inner Mongolia, the National Health Commission said. 

There were also 15 asymptomatic new cases recorded.

Mainland China has now officially recorded 82,919 Covid-19 cases and 4,633 deaths. Some 78,171 patients have recovered and been discharged from hospital, according to the NHC.

A further 760 asymptomatic patients, who are counted separately, are still under medical observation.

New clusters emerge: China began lifting restrictions and lockdowns in April after the number of new local transmissions fell to near-zero -- but on Sunday, the NHC recorded 10 new local cases.

Five of those were in Wuhan, ground zero for the global pandemic.

Fresh lockdown measures were announced for the northeastern city of Shulan over the weekend after 11 coronavirus cases were reported there. 

##Cases#

9:25 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Walt Disney World is now accepting reservations starting July 

An empty road leads into a deserted Disney resort after it was closed due to the Covid-19 pandemic in Kissimmee, Florida on May 5.
An empty road leads into a deserted Disney resort after it was closed due to the Covid-19 pandemic in Kissimmee, Florida on May 5. Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images

Walt Disney World theme parks and Disney Resort hotels are now accepting reservations for travel dates starting July 1 onward.

According to their website, guests are able to modify these bookings if Walt Disney World Resort opens before or after that time. 

Disney Springs will also begin a phased reopening on May 20, while other areas of Walt Disney World Resort remain closed, including theme parks and Disney resort hotels, the website added.

9:23 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

More than 80,000 deaths have been recorded in US

Wisconsin National Guard members administer Covid-19 tests in a parking lot on May 11, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Wisconsin National Guard members administer Covid-19 tests in a parking lot on May 11, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Morry Gash/AP

The United States has recorded at least 1,347,151 cases of coronavirus and at least 80,378 related deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

At least 17,360 new cases and 850 deaths have been recorded on Monday.

The totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases.

New York remains the hardest hit state, with 337,055 confirmed cases. New Jersey follows at 140,206.

CNN is tracking US coronavirus cases here:

8:57 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Trump administration announces $11 billion will go to states for coronavirus testing

From Jason Hoffman and Manu Raju

US President Donald Trump speaks during a news briefing about coronavirus testing in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 11, in Washington.
US President Donald Trump speaks during a news briefing about coronavirus testing in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 11, in Washington. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

US President Donald Trump and his administration announced today that the federal government is sending $11 billion to states to expand coronavirus testing capabilities.

When Trump made the announcement in the Rose Garden, he appeared to misspeak, saying "1 billion" has been approved and the "money is going out."

Adm. Brett Giroir, Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Services, later clarified in the Rose Garden briefing it is $11 billion going to states.

The relief package signed on April 24 included $25 billion for testing, with $11 billion for states, localities, territories and tribes. 

Giroir said in order for states to receive the funding, there has to be plans in place that address testing in "vulnerable communities."

"There needs to be minimum numbers to be planned to test. They have to have plans for their vulnerable communities, including nursing homes, including those who are disabled, including those who are in prisons or who have working environments that they may have a more likelihood to spread the infection," he said.
8:58 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Coronavirus may have killed more people in New York City than death toll shows, CDC warns

From CNN’s Arman Azad

A man walks through the Financial District on May 11, in New York City.
A man walks through the Financial District on May 11, in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic, directly or indirectly, may have killed far more people in New York City than the official Covid-19 death toll shows, according to a report released Monday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report looked at excess mortality in the city and found that 24,172 more people died since mid-March compared to what would normally be expected.

Indirect deaths: About 19,000 of these were either confirmed or probable coronavirus deaths. But more than 5,000 of the city’s excess deaths had no explicit connection to Covid-19, said the team, led by Donald Olson of the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 

It’s difficult to know why exactly those deaths occurred. But Olson’s team noted that people with underlying conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, are more likely to die from coronavirus infections and such deaths may not have been directly attributed to Covid-19.

“In addition, social distancing practices, the demand on hospitals and health care providers, and public fear related to COVID-19 might lead to delays in seeking or obtaining lifesaving care,” they wrote.

Nationwide problem: The findings add to a growing body of evidence showing how the coronavirus pandemic may be killing people without ever infecting them. For example, experts have said that a decline in reported heart attacks and strokes in the US is likely the result of people avoiding emergency rooms.

“Tracking excess mortality is important to understanding the contribution to the death rate from both COVID-19 disease and the lack of availability of care for non-COVID conditions,” the researchers wrote in their report.

8:59 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Coronavirus cases rose over weekend in some countries where lockdowns were lifted

From CNN's Jacqueline Howard

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus speaks during a media briefing in Geneva on May 11.
World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus speaks during a media briefing in Geneva on May 11. WHO

There was a surge of coronavirus cases over the weekend in some countries where stay-at-home measures and other restrictions were lifted, World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during a media briefing in Geneva on Monday.

"Over the weekend we saw signs of the challenges that may lie ahead. In the Republic of Korea, bars and clubs were shut as a confirmed case led to many contacts being traced," Tedros said.

"In Wuhan, China, the first cluster of cases since their lockdown was lifted was identified," Tedros said. "Germany has also reported an increase in cases since an easing of restrictions. Fortunately, all three countries have systems in place to detect and respond to a resurgence in cases."

Tedros said the WHO has released guidance and six criteria for countries to consider before lifting lockdown measures.

"WHO is working closely with governments to ensure that key public health measures remain in place to deal with the challenge of lifting lockdowns," he said. "Until there is a vaccine, the comprehensive package of measures is our most effective set of tools to tackle."

9:02 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Turkey will enforce a 4-day curfew next weekend

From CNN's Gul Tuysuz

Barbers cut hair while wearing protective face masks in a barber shop in Istanbul on May 11.
Barbers cut hair while wearing protective face masks in a barber shop in Istanbul on May 11. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Turkey will implement a four-day curfew from May 16-19, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Monday. 

The country has not implemented countrywide lockdowns, instead opting for curfews that prohibit people from leaving their homes on weekends and holidays.

Turkey has also imposed an age-specific curfew for people over the age of 65 and under 20. Those restrictions will be eased slowly with certain age groups being allowed out on specific days, according to Erdogan. 

Travel restrictions have been lifted in nine provinces, while 15 other provinces -- including Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir -- remain closed to nonessential entry and exits, Erdogan said.

Turkey will manage the easing of restrictions “dynamically” and will relax or tighten depending on developments, Erdogan said. Hair stylists, barbers and shopping malls reopened today as a part of what Turkish authorities are calling the “controlled socialization” stage of the Covid-19 pandemic plan.

Lowest daily cases: This comes as the country recorded its lowest number of daily positive coronavirus cases since March 26.

Some 1,114 people tested positive in the past 24 hours, the national health ministry said on Monday.

9:38 p.m. ET, May 11, 2020

Paris subway riders will be fined if they don't wear face masks

From Eva Tapiero in Paris 

Face masks are now compulsory on the Paris metro system and commuters will need certificates from their employers to explain why they are traveling during rush hour.

If commuters do not follow these guidelines, they risk being fined 135 euros ($145), a spokesperson for RATP, Paris’s state-owned public transport operator, said on Monday. 

The measures will be enforced by RATP security officers and police officers.

It comes after French Ecology Minister Elisabeth Borne said during a news conference last Thursday that masks on public transport will be made mandatory for anyone above 11 years old.

Face masks in France are divided into three categories:

  • FFP2-type filtering masks
  • Surgical masks
  • Masks for general use that can be homemade, following specific rules

All of those are acceptable to be used on the Paris metro.