May 20 coronavirus news

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2:26 a.m. ET, May 20, 2020

India reports more than 5,600 new cases in biggest one-day jump

From CNN's Swati Gupta in New Delhi

Health workers arrange coronavirus swab test samples at a government hospital in Jammu, India, on May.18.
Health workers arrange coronavirus swab test samples at a government hospital in Jammu, India, on May.18. Channi Anand/AP

India recorded 5,611 new coronavirus cases today -- its biggest one-day jump since the pandemic started, according to the country's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

This past weekend, India saw its infection numbers surge, with total cases increasing by 10,000 in just two days. The latest numbers raise the national total to 106,750 cases and 3,303 deaths, said the ministry.

The highest number of cases have been concentrated in the western state of Maharashtra, which has 37,136 cases and 1,325 deaths so far.

India has conducted more than 2.5 million tests nationwide so far, according to the Indian Council of Medical Research.

1:51 a.m. ET, May 20, 2020

The class of 2020 graduated this week in the midst of a global pandemic

A student picks up his diploma during a graduation ceremony at Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School on May 6 in Bradley, Illinois.
A student picks up his diploma during a graduation ceremony at Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School on May 6 in Bradley, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images

This week, high school and college seniors across the United States are graduating -- a major milestone that looks a little different during a global pandemic.

Many schools are holding virtual events or drive-through celebrations, or postponing their ceremonies until later in the summer in hopes of having them in person. But some schools are finding safe ways to make sure the show goes on.

One high school in Indiana, located close to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, will be handing out diplomas to seniors at the racetrack's finish line. Each student and their family will be allowed one car, in which they will get to drive onto the speedway and get out at the finish line.

For many college seniors, the process looks more stressful: they are graduating into a labor market that's been devastated by Covid-19. But for a few days, they get to celebrate the end of their student careers, and the culmination of years of hard work.

Many seniors returned to their campuses and dormitories this week, wearing face masks and gowns to take graduation photos -- a rite of passage. Other students held small gatherings to carry out graduation rituals, like jumping into school fountains and toasting champagne.

In New York, following annual tradition, the Empire State Building was lit up purple on Tuesday night in celebration of New York University's graduation. Tomorrow, it will be lit blue and white for Columbia University's graduation.

1:25 a.m. ET, May 20, 2020

Trump sows division and confusion as anxious country edges toward opening

Analysis from CNN's Stephen Collinson

Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

If America navigates its risky pursuit of a comeback without unleashing a vicious resurgence of coronavirus, it will be in spite of US President Donald Trump, not because of him.

By this weekend, all 50 states will have taken at least some steps to reopening societies and economies as the country stops trying to halt the virus in its tracks and tries to learn to live with it -- at least until a proven therapy or vaccine is developed.

But they will not be shepherded by a president offering advice on how to safely open, empowering his public health officials, or publicly shouldering the fear and concern of his compatriots.

Instead, Trump is undermining his own government's best practices by dosing himself with the drug hydroxychloroquine, discrediting studies that found it isn't effective in combating Covid-19 and refusing to wear a mask as recommended by his own health experts.

But in Trump country, every step the President takes that seems a dereliction of duty to his critics can be perceived by loyal fans as delivering on the promise of establishment-splintering leadership for which they voted in 2016.

Trump's strategy -- that effectively replaces the rallies that invigorate the base he believes is the passport to a second term -- is stirring a combustible political brew that is likely to further deepen national divides exacerbated by the pandemic.

Read the full analysis here:

1:03 a.m. ET, May 20, 2020

Nearly 200 cases in South Korea have been linked to the Itaewon nightclub cluster

From CNN's Jake Kwon in Seoul

Notices are seen on a now closed nightclub in the nightlife district of Itaewon in Seoul, South Korea, on May 12.
Notices are seen on a now closed nightclub in the nightlife district of Itaewon in Seoul, South Korea, on May 12. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images

In South Korea, 193 coronavirus cases have been linked to a Seoul nightclub cluster, Vice Health Minister Kim Gang-lip said today.

The cluster, which was identified on May 9, is concentrated in the capital city's entertainment district of Itaewon.

The cases are believed to have begun after an infected 29-year-old went to several different clubs in the area, according to Seoul officials. Authorities used credit card records, cell phone data, and other methods to track down all the people who had visited Itaewon, and asked them all to be tested.

More than 65,000 people have been tested in relation to the cluster, said the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday.

New cases nationwide: The country reported 32 new cases on Tuesday, 24 of which were locally transmitted. There were no new deaths.

This brings the national total to 11,110 cases and 263 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

12:38 a.m. ET, May 20, 2020

It's just past midnight in Washington and noon in Tokyo. Here's the latest on the pandemic

A staff member wearing a face mask checks the train's cars at the terminal station of the Asakusa Line in Tokyo on May 19.
A staff member wearing a face mask checks the train's cars at the terminal station of the Asakusa Line in Tokyo on May 19. Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images

If you're just joining us, here are the latest developments on the coronavirus pandemic.

In the US:

  • The numbers: The US has more than 1.5 million cases and is approaching 92,000 deaths. At least 17 states have recorded a clear upward trend of average new daily cases over the past seven days, 
  • All states will soon be partially reopened: By Wednesday, every US state will have begun lifting lockdown and quarantine measures. The CDC released detailed guidelines for reopening, which uses a three-phase approach.
  • Death toll prediction is lowered: A key coronavirus model has revised its death projection for the United States slightly downward, now forecasting that 143,360 people will die by August 4.
  • Uneven economic relief under scrutiny: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell were front-and-center Tuesday at the first Senate hearing on how the $2.2 trillion coronavirus rescue package is being implemented.

Around the world:

  • Concerns about children: Doctors are warning that children may develop multisystem inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C -- a complication of Covid-19 infection. Many of the children with the new syndrome have damage to their hearts and need immediate treatment, doctors say.
  • Brazil records a surge: The country reported 17,408 new cases and 1,179 new deaths -- its largest one-day jump since the pandemic began. Brazil now has the third highest number of cases in the world, behind the US and Russia.
  • Spain sees protests: Spain's number of daily deaths have stayed under 100 for three consecutive days now. Meanwhile, people have taken to the streets to protest the state of emergency order and movement restrictions.
  • Italy slowly reopens: The country's daily death toll rose slightly Tuesday after several days of declining numbers. On Monday, bars, restaurants, stores, hairdressers and museums reopened in most regions after nearly 10 weeks of lockdown.
  • Japan considers lifting measures: A state of emergency is still in place in eight of Japan's hardest-hit prefectures, including Osaka and Tokyo. With daily case numbers showing a downward trend, the government is expected to decide tomorrow whether to lift the order in those remaining places.
12:14 a.m. ET, May 20, 2020

Japan's case numbers dip as government considers whether to lift state of emergency

From CNN's Junko Ogura in Tokyo

A medical staff member holds a container of a swab sample for a Covid-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test during a rehearsal at a testing site outside Kashima Soccer Stadium on May 10, in Kashima, Japan.
A medical staff member holds a container of a swab sample for a Covid-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test during a rehearsal at a testing site outside Kashima Soccer Stadium on May 10, in Kashima, Japan. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Japan recorded 31 new coronavirus cases and eight deaths on Tuesday, raising the national total to 16,925 infections and 784 deaths.

Tuesday was the 10th consecutive day that fewer than 30 new cases were recorded in the country. Daily new cases have been steadily declining over the past month; just weeks ago Japan was still reporting between 100 and 300 cases a day.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe first declared a state of emergency in several affected prefectures on April 7, before extending it to the entire country on April 16. The measure was lifted last week for most prefectures.

It remains in place in eight hard-hit prefectures, including Tokyo and Osaka. Tomorrow, the government is expected to decide whether and when to lift the state of emergency in those places.

11:48 p.m. ET, May 19, 2020

US reports more than 20,000 new Covid-19 cases

At least 20,260 new coronavirus cases and 1,574 Covid-19-related deaths were reported in the United States on Tuesday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

That brings the national totals to at least 1,528,568 cases and 91,921 fatalities.

The totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases.

CNN is tracking US coronavirus cases here:

11:28 p.m. ET, May 19, 2020

Cambridge University will hold all classes online for the 2020-21 academic year

From CNN's Mitch McCluskey in Atlanta

Cambridge University in England.
Cambridge University in England. Source: Shutterstock

The University of Cambridge is moving all classes online for the upcoming academic year, until the summer of 2021, the university announced on Tuesday, according to the UK Press Association.

Cambridge is the first British university to announce virtual teaching for the 2020-21 academic year.

"The University is constantly adapting to changing advice as it emerges during this pandemic. Given that it is likely that social distancing will continue to be required, the university has decided there will be no face-to-face lectures during the next academic year," a university spokesman told PA.  

In-person lectures are expected to resume again after summer 2021, but smaller face-to-face teaching groups may take place earlier if it "conforms to social-distancing requirements," the spokesman said.

11:09 p.m. ET, May 19, 2020

Children with suspected Covid-related syndrome need immediate attention, doctors say

From CNN's Maggie Fox

Kids who may have multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C, a troubling complication of Covid-19 infection, need immediate attention and will probably need to be hospitalized, doctors said Tuesday.

It's becoming clear that many of the children with the new syndrome have damage to their hearts and need immediate treatment, the doctors said during a meeting organized by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The doctors said they believe it's increasingly clear that Covid-19 is involved, even though many of the children test negative for the virus at first and never seemed to have had symptoms of infection.

What we know: The syndrome appears to develop two to six weeks after infection with Covid-19 and affects mostly children who were perfectly healthy beforehand.

Symptoms do not look like the classic symptoms of coronavirus and may mostly include stomach pain and vomiting, along with fever and perhaps a rash, the experts said.

The CDC issued a health alert last week warning pediatricians to be on the lookout, and at least 20 states plus Washington, DC have reported they are investigating possible cases.

Read the full story: