May 31 coronavirus news

19 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
6:34 p.m. ET, May 31, 2020

US sending hydroxychloroquine and ventilators to Brazil

From CNN’s Jason Hoffman

A pharmacy tech holds a pill of Hydroxychloroquine at Rock Canyon Pharmacy in Provo, Utah, on May 20.
A pharmacy tech holds a pill of Hydroxychloroquine at Rock Canyon Pharmacy in Provo, Utah, on May 20. George Frey/AFP/Getty Images

The United States has delivered 2 million doses of hydroxychloroquine and will soon send 1,000 ventilators to Brazil, according to a joint statement from both countries.

The statement reads in part, "HCQ will be used as a prophylactic to help defend Brazil’s nurses, doctors, and healthcare professionals against the virus. It will also be used as a therapeutic to treat Brazilians who become infected."

This comes after the World Health Organization announced it has temporarily halted studying hydroxychloroquine as a potential Covid-19 treatment due to safety concerns. The decision was made after an observational study published in the medical journal The Lancet described how seriously ill Covid-19 patients who were treated with hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine were more likely to die.

The US Food and Drug Administration has warned against the use of hydroxychloroquine outside of clinical trials and that there are currently no published studies on using the drug as a prophylaxis, or preventative treatment.

The statement also announces the formation of a joint research effort to help combat coronavirus in the two countries. 

"Further, in continuation of the two countries' longstanding collaboration on health issues, we are also announcing a joint United States-Brazilian research effort that will include randomized controlled clinical trials.”

The US and Brazil are the two countries with the highest confirmed number of coronavirus cases worldwide.

 

6:32 p.m. ET, May 31, 2020

More than 104,000 people have died from coronavirus in the US

A hearse enters a temporary morgue near Green-Wood Cemetery on May 27 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
A hearse enters a temporary morgue near Green-Wood Cemetery on May 27 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

There have been at least 1,778,515 coronavirus cases in US and approximately 104,051 deaths due to the virus, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University. 

The totals includes cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases.

6:30 p.m. ET, May 31, 2020

Covid-19 cases continue to decline in Italy, despite loosened restrictions

From CNN's Nicola Ruotolo and Zahid Mahmood

People enjoy a gondola ride on May 30 in Venice, Italy.
People enjoy a gondola ride on May 30 in Venice, Italy. Andrea Pattaro/AFP/Getty Images

Despite four weeks of loosened restrictions, the number of Covid-19 cases in Italy continue to decline.

The number of active cases of coronavirus decreased by more than 1,600 over a 24-hour period, according to figures released by Italy’s Civil Protection Agency on Sunday.

The statement said that there has been a decrease of at least 1,616 cases since Saturday’s figures, bringing the total number to approximately 42,075.

The Covid-19 death toll in the country currently stands at approximately 33,415 – an increase of 75 deaths due to the virus since yesterday, according to the agency.

12:28 p.m. ET, May 31, 2020

Number of coronavirus deaths in New York state continues to drop, governor says

From CNN's Elise Hammond

State of New York
State of New York

At least 56 people died due to coronavirus in New York state yesterday –– a decrease from 67 deaths on May 29, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at his daily news briefing on Sunday.

"This reduction in the number of deaths is tremendous progress from where we were," he said.

The number of total hospitalizations, new hospitalizations and intubations have also all decreased, Cuomo said.

"All good news," he said.

10:38 a.m. ET, May 31, 2020

Spanish government will seek a further extension of the state of emergency

From CNN's Laura Pérez Maestro and Abel Alvarado

Mariscal/EFE Agency/Pool/Getty Images
Mariscal/EFE Agency/Pool/Getty Images

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez celebrated the “great results of the last few weeks” when it comes to coronavirus cases during a news conference on Sunday, but said "we can't relax" and said "the virus is still present in our country.”

The prime minister announced that his government will be seeking a further 15-day extension of the state of emergency.

“We need 15 more days to end this health emergency in a definite manner," he explained.

Sánchez also announced that starting June 8, the government will transfer the responsibility of the de-escalation process to the regional governments in regions in phase three.

The central government will only keep control on mobility once the regions reach phase three.

10:16 a.m. ET, May 31, 2020

It became clear to the White House last week that an economic summit in June is likely impossible

From CNN's Kevin Liptak

It became clear to the White House late last week that convening an in-person G7 economic summit on US soil would likely be impossible by the end of June, particularly with the addition of several other countries President Trump wants to include in the meeting, people familiar with the matter told CNN.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s announcement that she wouldn’t be able to participate due to concerns over coronavirus helped cement the decision, those people said. 

In a phone call with Trump on Saturday, French President Emmanuel Macron argued that in order to convene in-person, the entire group needed to be present, one western official familiar with the matter said.

Macron and Merkel have been tightly aligned at past G7 meetings in representing European interests. 

The G7 brings together annually brings together the leaders of seven of the world’s leading economies.

10:10 a.m. ET, May 31, 2020

Jerusalem's holiest site reopens as coronavirus restrictions ease

From CNN's Oren Liebermann and Abeer Salman

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

One of the holiest sites in Jerusalem reopened Sunday morning for the first time in more than two months, in a further sign of the easing of coronavirus restrictions by the Israeli government.

The site, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as the Temple Mount, is often a flashpoint in Jerusalem’s Old City, but the day passed with only relatively minor incidents under a heavy security presence.

Entering the compound, Muslim worshippers, many wearing the ubiquitous blue facemasks for protection, chanted, "God is the greatest. We sacrifice our blood and soul for you, al-Aqsa," referring to the compound’s mosque. 

A group of religious Jews later arrived at the site during morning visitation hours, escorted by Israeli security forces. The compound is the holiest site in the world for Jews and the third holiest site for Muslims.

Worshippers were allowed to enter the mosque building, as well as the Dome of the Rock shrine, but they were required to have their own prayer rug and mask. Approximately 4,000 people arrived for dawn prayers, the director of the mosque told CNN, a tiny fraction of the hundreds of thousands the compound can host on a busy day.

Some background: The compound is one of the last holy sites in and around Jerusalem to reopen. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, also in Jerusalem’s Old City, reopened its doors last week, as did the Church of the Nativity in nearby Bethlehem. The Western Wall reopened earlier in May.

Israel and the Palestinian Authority have both begun to ease restrictions imposed as a result of coronavirus. The decision to impose tough restrictions early in the pandemic’s spread is seen as a key factor in why cases of coronavirus have stayed relatively low in both Israel and the Palestinian territories. 

But Israeli leaders have begun warning of a sudden rise in the number of new infections in the last few days, raising the possibility that restrictions could be re-imposed if the numbers continue to rise.

4:12 p.m. ET, May 31, 2020

Faithful return to St. Peter's Square to hear Pope Francis' words

From CNN's Delia Gallagher in Rome

Pope Francis delivers a blessing from his studio window overlooking St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on May 31.
Pope Francis delivers a blessing from his studio window overlooking St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on May 31. Vatican News via AP

In a small sign of life getting back to normal, crowds returned to St. Peter’s Square in the Vatican City on Sunday as Pope Francis resumed his traditional greeting from his window, for the first time since lockdown began in Italy nearly three months ago.

The Pope said he hoped people would “have the courage to change, to be better than before and to positively build the post-pandemic world.”

He appealed for everyone, including the world's poorest people, to have access to health care and prayed particularly for those affected in the Amazon region of South America. “People are more important than the economy,” he said.

Tourists were noticeably absent and only several hundred people, mainly Italians, wearing masks and social distancing, gathered to listen to the Pope and receive his blessing. 

“You know that from a crisis like this, you don’t come out of it the same as before. You come out either better or worse,” he said.

“The human family needs to come out of this crisis more united and not more divided.“

Italian and Vatican Police were stationed at all entrances and people entering St. Peter’s Basilica had their temperatures checked.

The Vatican museums will open on Monday, by online reservation only. Museums and other cultural sites throughout Italy will also reopen this week.

7:53 a.m. ET, May 31, 2020

Bars, gyms and restaurants in South Korea to keep a QR-code log of customers

From CNN's Jake Kwon in Seoul

People walk past a restaurant in the Itaewon district in Seoul, South Korea, on April 24.
People walk past a restaurant in the Itaewon district in Seoul, South Korea, on April 24. SongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Recreational venues in South Korea, including bars, nightclubs and indoor gyms, will be required to keep a QR code-based customer log from June 10, Health Minister Park Neung-hoo said Sunday.

This data will be automatically erased after four weeks to safeguard customer information.

The minister also outlined several other disease prevention guidelines required from June 2. Operators must regularly disinfect the premises, check customers for symptoms and ensure customers wear masks.

Those who violate the guidelines, including customers, could be subject to fines, and businesses could be forced to close.

As of 12 p.m. local time on Sunday, 111 cases were linked to the Coupang logistics center cluster and 270 cases were linked to the Itaewon nightclub cluster in Seoul, according to the Health Ministry.

The total number of confirmed cases in the country stands at 11,468, according to the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There have been 270 deaths in total.

Some context: South Korea has used technology to help it contain the coronavirus pandemic through aggressive testing, contact tracing and quarantine measures, without ordering a widespread lockdown.

After cases emerged linked to three venues in Seoul's Itaewon nightlife district, city authorities tried to trace those who were potentially exposed. But they found that some clubgoers avoided calls or had given false details on the door, the mayor said.

The city had to use phone signal tower records and credit card records instead to track some people down.