June 10 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Steve George, Zamira Rahim and Peter Wilkinson, CNN

Updated 12:34 a.m. ET, June 11, 2020
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1:39 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

US intends to reopen consulate in Wuhan later this month

From CNN's Jennifer Hansler

A man cooks outside of the restaurant on Jiqing street on June 5, in Wuhan, China.
A man cooks outside of the restaurant on Jiqing street on June 5, in Wuhan, China. Getty Images

The State Department informed Congress it intends to reopen the US consulate in Wuhan later this month, according to a congressional notification obtained by CNN.

"The Department is planning to resume operations on or around June 22, 2020, although stands ready to modify this schedule as conditions develop," the notification from Assistant Secretary of State for Legislative Affairs Mary Elizabeth Taylor said.

"At this critical juncture in US-China relations, it is critical that our diplomatic posts in China are staffed," the notification said.

The rhetoric between Washington and Beijing has grown increasingly heated throughout the coronavirus pandemic, and the Trump administration has sought to pin blame on China for the deadly outbreak that originated in Wuhan.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has repeatedly condemned Beijing for a lack of transparency about the pandemic.

He reiterated last month that the administration intends to punish China for the outbreak, but noted that "the precise mechanisms that we will choose -- I want to make sure that (President Donald Trump) gets the chance to get fully briefed and make those decisions."

Read the full story here.

1:23 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Las Vegas reopened. People showed up

From CNN's Matt Villano

Wayne Rogers wears a mask as he plays a slot machine at Bellagio Resort & Casino on the Las Vegas Strip on June 4, in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Wayne Rogers wears a mask as he plays a slot machine at Bellagio Resort & Casino on the Las Vegas Strip on June 4, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Dice were flying, restaurants were jam-packed, and Las Vegas was hopping reopening weekend as Sin City returned after more than two months of shutdown due to public health concerns surrounding the coronavirus pandemic.

The good news: Hotels and attractions were far busier than expected, prompting many local resort companies to accelerate plans to open more of their properties over the coming weeks.

The bad news: According to field reports from casino floors and the busy sidewalks lining Las Vegas Boulevard, few visitors were wearing face coverings or practicing social distancing — two precautions that local and federal public health officials have encouraged in order to slow the spread of Covid-19 through the summer.

Put simply, Vegas is back, but it may not be as safe as visitors might like during these trying times.

"Vegas is all about our guests being carefree, but in the initial days of reopening, it feels like there may be too much 'free' and too little 'care,'" said Scott Roeben, owner of VitalVegas.com, a travel blog. "People aren't being reckless; they just aren't as paranoid as I'd expected."

Read the full story here.

1:15 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Outbreak investigation aboard US aircraft carrier may contain clues about Covid-19 among the young and healthy

From CNN's Michael Nedelman

USS Theodore Roosevelt
USS Theodore Roosevelt US Navy/Getty Images

An investigation of a major coronavirus outbreak aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt aircraft carrier may reveal clues as to how Covid-19 affects younger adults.

"This is the first major look at Covid-19 infections among healthy young adults that the CDC has released," said Daniel Payne, an epidemiologist with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which collaborated with the US Navy on the investigation.

More than 1,000 of the ship's nearly 4,900-member crew tested positive for Covid-19 following the outbreak. After spending weeks at a port in Guam, the ship returned to sea last month.

The majority -- nearly 60% -- of sailors in the study who had antibodies had neutralizing ones, "a promising indicator of at least short-term immunity," the researchers wrote.

Most reported mild or no symptoms, and those who took preventive measures -- such as face masks and social distancing -- were less likely to become infected.

"What we saw was that most of the infections were actually mild, in addition to those that were asymptomatic," Payne told reporters Tuesday.
"And this is perhaps different from studies of older Americans, or maybe even those who were hospitalized already, and certainly much different from those with underlying health conditions."

Read the full story here.

1:17 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Covid-19 restrictions should be eased gradually, researchers recommend

From CNN's Andrea Kane

A woman demonstrates the use of plastic film for customers to test sofas, at the re-opened Heal's flagship store in central London on June 8.
A woman demonstrates the use of plastic film for customers to test sofas, at the re-opened Heal's flagship store in central London on June 8. Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images

Don't go cold turkey -- at least not when it comes to easing lockdown restrictions.

That's the message of a new study that uses mathematical modeling to show that governments shouldn't just turn off lockdown measures all at once for everyone, after infection rates have slowed, unless they want to risk a spike in coronavirus cases that threatens to overwhelm their health care system.

"Decision makers -- pay attention to the math: emerging from lockdowns requires a gradual and phased approach to keep infection under control," said Michael Bonsall from the Mathematical Ecology Research group at the University of Oxford, who helped lead the study team.

"Without this attention, you run the risk of burdening health systems with further waves of infection," Bonsall told CNN.

Lockdown restrictions, or "anti-contagion strategies," have varied from country to country and state to state but include travel bans, school closures, work from home/stay at home orders, quarantining and isolation. They can reduce infection rates, spreading infections over a longer period in an approach known as flattening the curve.

Thanks to lockdown measures, an estimated 60 million coronavirus infections were prevented in the United States, and 285 million in China, according to a separate study recently published in the journal Nature.

But lockdowns have huge emotional costs and have crippled economies across the globe, including officially plunging the United States into a recession.

Read the full story here.

1:19 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

More US universities report coronavirus cases in athletics programs

From CNN's Homero DeLaFuente

 Facade of Jordan Hare stadium on the campus of Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama.
 Facade of Jordan Hare stadium on the campus of Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. Shutterstock

Several universities this week joined a growing list of schools reporting coronavirus cases within their athletic programs.

Arkansas State reported that seven athletes from three sports programs tested positive last Wednesday. They were all asymptomatic and will remain in quarantine for 14 days, the university said.

Three football players from Auburn University in Alabama tested positive, an Auburn athletics spokesperson confirmed to CNN. The three athletes are asymptomatic and have been placed in self-isolation in a dorm away from the rest of the team.

The Texas Tech athletic department on Monday confirmed recent positive tests for Covid-19 within the men's basketball program. It did not provide a number of affected athletes.

The University of Iowa athletics department said out of the 237 Covid-19 tests administered to staff and athletes since May 29, one person has tested positive.

Read the full report here.

1:12 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Brazil records more than 32,000 coronavirus cases in a day

Health workers assist a Covid-19 patient at the Gilberto Novaes Municipal Hospital in Manaus, Brazil on June 8.
Health workers assist a Covid-19 patient at the Gilberto Novaes Municipal Hospital in Manaus, Brazil on June 8. Michael Dantas/AFP/Getty Images

Brazil recorded 32,091 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, bringing the country's total confirmed cases to 739,503, according to the Brazilian Health Ministry.

This is the fourth day Brazil's Health Ministry has recorded more than 30,000 new cases in a 24-hour period since the outbreak started.

The ministry also reported 1,272 new Covid-19 deaths Tuesday, bringing the country's death toll from the virus to 38,406.

Brazil's new totals come after the Pan American Health Organization said Covid-19 "continues to spread aggressively" in Brazil, Peru and Chile in a news briefing Tuesday.

The Americas have reported more than 3.3 million cases of Covid-19 as of June 8 — more than any other region in the world, according to Dr. Carissa Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization.

1:17 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

What's the difference between asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic spread? And does it matter with coronavirus?

From CNN's Holly Yan

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses. 
This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This novel coronavirus is bizarre for many reasons, making its spread unpredictable and hard to control.

One oddity is how easily people can get infected by someone without symptoms. But there's a difference between asymptomatic spread and pre-symptomatic spread.

Here's what you need to know:

Asymptomatic spread is the transmission of the virus by people who do not have symptoms and will never get symptoms from their infection. But those infected carriers could still get others very sick.

Pre-symptomatic spread is the transmission of the virus by people who don't look or feel sick, but will eventually get symptoms later.

Read the full report here.

1:12 a.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Covid-19 is Dr. Anthony Fauci's 'worst nightmare'

From CNN's Jen Christensen and Gisela Crespo

Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on April 29.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC on April 29. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Coronavirus is "my worst nightmare," in some ways more than Ebola or HIV, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday.

"Ebola was scary, but Ebola would never be easily transmitted," Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said. Ebola outbreaks are also always highly local.

"HIV, as important as it is, was drawn out and over an extended period of time," added Fauci, who was speaking via recorded video at the Biotechnology Innovation Organization International Convention. Many never felt threatened by the disease because it was always a threat "depending upon who you are, where you are, where you live."

In the past, when people would ask Fauci to describe a potential disease that he feared most, he said he would often describe it as something that was a brand new respiratory infection that likely jumped from an animal and had a very high degree of transmissibility.

The world has seen outbreaks that have at least some of those characteristics, he said, but Covid-19 had all of those characteristics combined.

"Now we have something that turned out to be my worst nightmare," Fauci said. "In the period of four months, it has devastated the world."

Read the full story here.

6:00 p.m. ET, June 10, 2020

Catch up: Here are the latest coronavirus updates from around the globe

If you're just joining us, here are the latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic from around the globe.

  • UK retail outlets to reopen: Retail outlets can reopen starting June 15 as long as they comply with government coronavirus-secure guidelines, UK Business Secretary Alok Sharma said Tuesday. Shops for essential items, such as food and medicines, were allowed to remain open during the lockdown but this announcement means outlets selling nonessential items can now reopen. 
  • Masks mandatory in Spain: Wearing masks will continue to be mandatory even after Spain’s state of emergency is lifted on June 21, and the country enters a period of “new normality.” The move follows the Spanish Cabinet's approval of a new health decree Tuesday.
  • Human trial begins in China: Doctors in China dosed a healthy volunteer on Monday with an antibody treatment developed by pharmaceutical companies Eli Lilly and Junshi Biosciences to fight Covid-19. Eli Lilly will start a complementary phase one study in the United States in the next few days, the company said. 
  • Airline industry expected to lose billions: The global airline industry will lose $84 billion in 2020 and then an additional $15 billion in 2021, according to a new forecast for the International Air Transport Association.
  • Coronavirus in Peru: The number of confirmed cases of novel coronavirus surpassed 200,000 in Peru on Tuesday, according to numbers released by the country's Health Ministry. The country reported 4,040 new cases Tuesday, bringing its total to 203,736. Peru also recorded 167 new Covid-19 deaths, bringing the country's total to 5,738.