June 28 coronavirus news

12 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
2:04 a.m. ET, June 28, 2020

India reports biggest single-day jump with over 19,000 new Covid-19 cases

From CNN's Rishabh Pratap

Staff at Shiva's Signature hair salon wearing Personal Protective Equipment  suits and face shields attend customers after personal grooming services were allowed to resume following relaxation of lockdown norms amidst Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic, in Mumbai on June 28, 2020. - India now has more than 500,000 confirmed coronavirus cases, according to government figures released on June 27 that showed a record daily leap of 18,500 new infections. (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP) (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP via Getty Images)
Staff at Shiva's Signature hair salon wearing Personal Protective Equipment suits and face shields attend customers after personal grooming services were allowed to resume following relaxation of lockdown norms amidst Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic, in Mumbai on June 28, 2020. - India now has more than 500,000 confirmed coronavirus cases, according to government figures released on June 27 that showed a record daily leap of 18,500 new infections. (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP) (Photo by INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP via Getty Images) Indranil Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images

India reported 19,906 new coronavirus cases on Sunday -- the country's biggest one-day jump.

Another 410 deaths due to the pandemic were recorded, according to India’s Health Ministry.

That brings India's total reported coronavirus cases to 528,859, including 16,095 deaths and 309,712 recovered cases.

The west Indian state of Maharashtra has the highest number of coronavirus cases in the country, with 159,133 reported cases.

That's followed by national capital Delhi, which has reported 80,188 cases.

Read more about Delhi's outbreak here.

2:03 a.m. ET, June 28, 2020

A 10,000-bed Covid-19 facility is set to open in India

From CNN's Rishabh Pratap

A new 10,000-bed Covid-19 treatment facility is set to open in south Delhi this week.

It will be India's largest Covid-19 facility.

Starting Sunday, 2,000 beds will be operational, while the remaining 8,000 beds will come into use from Wednesday, according to the Delhi government.

India’s Home Minister Amit Shah and Delhi’s Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal visited the facility Saturday.

“This 10,000-bed center would provide huge relief to the people of Delhi,” tweeted Shah on Saturday.

The Indo-Tibetan Border Police have taken over the facility and will oversee its administration and operations, confirmed the home minister.

"I applaud our courageous ITBP personnel, who would be operating this Covid care facility during these trying times. Their commitment to serve the nation and people of Delhi is unparalleled," Shah tweeted.

As of Sunday, Delhi has reported 80,188 coronavirus cases, including 2,558 deaths, according to India’s Health Ministry.

1:36 a.m. ET, June 28, 2020

There are at least 2.5M coronavirus cases in the United States

From CNN’s Rebekah Riess

Community outreach specialist Rogelio Bucio collects patient information as they wait in line at a walk up Covid-19 testing site on June 27, in Dallas, Texas.
Community outreach specialist Rogelio Bucio collects patient information as they wait in line at a walk up Covid-19 testing site on June 27, in Dallas, Texas. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

There are at least 2,510,151 cases of coronavirus in the United States, including at least 125,539 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University's tally.

On Saturday, Johns Hopkins reported 42,597 new cases and 500 additional deaths. The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases. 

For the latest Johns Hopkins University US numbers, check hereCNN’s map, using JHU data, continues to refresh every 15 mins.

1:36 a.m. ET, June 28, 2020

All travelers returning to one Australian state will be tested before being released from quarantine

From CNN's Sol Han

Premier of Victoria, Daniel Andrews, speaks during a press conference on June 28, in Melbourne, Australia.
Premier of Victoria, Daniel Andrews, speaks during a press conference on June 28, in Melbourne, Australia. Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images

All those returning to the Australian state of Victoria will need to test negative for coronavirus before being released from quarantine, says Victoria premier Daniel Andrews.

Victoria is the only state in Australia that has been testing returned travelers twice – on day three and day 11.

Starting Sunday, the day 11 test will become mandatory and those who refuse to comply will be required to remain in quarantine for another 10 days.

Andrews also said that some suburbs could be put under a stay-at-home order or some sort of lockdown, if needed.

“I’m not announcing that today, but there’s been some talk in the media today about those sort of suburban lockdowns," he said. "I’m hoping it doesn’t get to that.”

The background: Victoria has seen a spike in cases over the past two weeks. Last Friday, the state said it would launch a targeted testing program, allowing residents in 10 suburbs to receive free testing for the next 10 days.

In total, 40,000 tests have been conducted since the program was launched.

Andrews said the current situation is “much like a bushfire."

"Putting this out is challenging, containing it, though, is something that we can do.”

12:42 a.m. ET, June 28, 2020

China reports another 17 coronavirus cases -- including 14 that were locally transmitted

From CNN's Anna Kam

People wear masks as they cross a road in Beijing on June 28.
People wear masks as they cross a road in Beijing on June 28. Greg Ba

China has reported 17 additional cases of coronavirus, according to the National Health Commission (NHC). 

That number included 14 locally transmitted cases in Beijing, which is dealing with a fresh outbreak. The other three cases were imported cases.

According to NHC, China has reported a total of 83,500 confirmed cases. A total of 78,451 patients have been discharged, and 4,634 people have died.

12:02 a.m. ET, June 28, 2020

Washington Post: Trump campaign had social distancing stickers removed before Tulsa rally

From CNN's Kelly Mena, in Washington, DC

US President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, in Washington, DC.
US President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Donald Trump's campaign directed the removal of thousands of "Do Not Sit Here, Please!" stickers from seats in the Bank of Oklahoma Center in the hours before the President's much-anticipated Tulsa rally, the Washington Post reported on Saturday.

As part of the BOK Center's safety plan for the June 20 rally, arena management had purchased 12,000 do-not-sit stickers with the intention of keeping people apart by leaving open seats between attendees, according to the Post.

Then on the day of the rally, when event staff had already placed the stickers on nearly every other chair in the 19,000-seat arena, the Trump campaign told event management to stop and began removing the stickers, according to a person familiar with the event who spoke to the Washington Post on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal matters.

Tim Murtaugh, the Trump campaign's communications director, didn't address the sticker removal incident but instead touted the health precautions that were taken for the event in a statement to CNN.

"The rally was in full compliance with local requirements. In addition, every rally attendee received a temperature check prior to admission, was given a face mask, and provided ample access to hand sanitizer," Murtaugh said Saturday.

Read the full story here.

12:00 a.m. ET, June 28, 2020

Measures to protect Trump from coronavirus scale up ... even as he seeks to move on

From CNN's Kevin Liptak and Kaitlan Collins

US President Donald Trump participates in a meeting of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board in the East Room of the White House on June 26, in Washington, DC.
US President Donald Trump participates in a meeting of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board in the East Room of the White House on June 26, in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Donald Trump appears ready to move on from a still-raging coronavirus pandemic -- skipping the first White House task force briefing in months and moving the event out of the White House itself. But the measures meant to protect him from catching the virus have scaled up dramatically.

As he seeks to insert rival Joe Biden's health into the presidential campaign, Trump has voiced escalating concern about how it would appear if he contracted coronavirus and has insisted on steps to protect himself, even as he refuses to wear a mask in public and agitates for large campaign rallies.

When he travels to locations where the virus is surging, every venue the President enters is inspected for potential areas of contagion by advance security and medical teams, according to people familiar with the arrangements. Bathrooms designated for the President's use are scrubbed and sanitized before he arrives. Staff maintain a close accounting of who will come into contact with the President to ensure they receive tests.

While the White House phases out steps such as temperature checks and required mask-wearing in the West Wing -- changes meant to signal the country is moving on -- those around the President still undergo regular testing. And even as Trump attempts to put the pandemic behind him by encouraging reopening and downplaying the new surge, there are signs of the still-raging pandemic even within his orbit.

Read the full story here.

11:59 p.m. ET, June 27, 2020

Here's what health experts want you to know about travel and vacations

Arriving passengers wait for their bags in the baggage claim area at LaGuardia Airport's Terminal B baggage claim area, on Thursday, June 25, in New York City.
Arriving passengers wait for their bags in the baggage claim area at LaGuardia Airport's Terminal B baggage claim area, on Thursday, June 25, in New York City. Kathy Willens/AP

We asked health experts to help you navigate how best to get away -- and what pitfalls they see along the way.

What types of Covid-19 precautions should people take this summer while traveling by car? By plane?

Here's what Dr. Jay C. Butler, the deputy director for infectious diseases at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, said:

"Airports and security lines may put people in close contact and social distancing may be difficult on crowded flights so it will be extremely important to wear a face covering, cover coughs and sneezes and wash your hands. Traveling by car may expose people to others and infected surfaces when stopping for gas, food and bathroom breaks. So anticipating your travel needs are important. Bring alcohol-based hand sanitizer, wear face coverings in public places and pick up food at drive-throughs or curbside restaurants."

If you wanted to visit far-away family, would you stay with them?

Dr. Susan Bailey, an allergist and immunologist and president of the American Medical Association, based in Forth Worth, Texas, replied:

"Visiting far-away family almost necessarily would entail air travel. And if you’re traveling by air and encountering that many people, I don’t think you have a choice but to self-quarantine, which makes staying with family next to impossible. I would strongly advise against that."

Read more answers here.

11:52 p.m. ET, June 27, 2020

Is the world turning its back on US tourists?

From CNN's Stacey Lastoe

A traveler walks past screeners testing a system of thermal imaging cameras which check body temperatures at Los Angeles International Airport on June 24, in Los Angeles, California.
A traveler walks past screeners testing a system of thermal imaging cameras which check body temperatures at Los Angeles International Airport on June 24, in Los Angeles, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images

In downtown Buffalo, New York, crossing the border into Ontario, Canada, used to be as easy as driving one mile across the Peace Bridge over the Niagara River. But that's now a forbidden route.

In the coronavirus era, New York residents and out-of-state road trippers aren't allowed to cross the border for leisure travel.

US citizens have been shut out of their neighboring country to the north and a slew of nations around the world. The latest travel news affecting Americans: The European Union is considering blocking travelers from areas with severe Covid-19 outbreaks after it opens it borders on July 1.

Since the United States has more confirmed coronavirus cases than anywhere else in the world, with numbers increasing in some states each day, US travelers are unlikely to be allowed in any time soon.

"The US' chances are close to zero," an EU diplomat told CNN. "With their infection rates ... not even they can believe in that possibility."

Although potential travel bubbles are being discussed all over the world -- Fiji is the latest in talks to form one with Australia and New Zealand -- the United States has yet to join a bubble.

Where does this new world order leave US citizens with a penchant for travel?

Nostalgic for the pre-Covid days when a US passport promised access to much of the world? Anxious of how they'll be perceived -- and received -- by foreign countries when restrictions are eventually loosened?

Read the full story here.