July 10 coronavirus news

By Nectar Gan, Steve George, Laura Smith-Spark, Ed Upright, Meg Wagner and Melissa Macaya, CNN

Updated 0015 GMT (0815 HKT) July 11, 2020
39 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
10:54 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

These are the key things to consider before reopening US schools, according to professional associations 

From CNN's Naomi Thomas

Professional associations said that “educators and pediatricians share the goal of children returning safely to school this fall,” in a joint statement released Friday by the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Federation of Teachers, National Education Association and AASA, The School Superintendents Association.

They said they are committed to doing everything they can so that students have this opportunity.

“Returning to school is important for the healthy development and well-being of children, but we must pursue reopening in a way that is safe for all students, teachers and staff,” the groups said, while acknowledging that science should be used to drive the decision making.

They noted that decisions to reopen schools should include local school leaders, public health experts, educators and parents, and they must take into account things including community spread of Covid-19 and the ability of schools to adapt safety protocols.

“For instance, in schools in areas with high levels of Covid-19 community spread should not be compelled to reopen against the judgement of local experts,” the groups said in the statement. “A one-size-fits all approach is not appropriate for return to school decisions.”

The statement listed a number of reasons beyond education why returning to school is beneficial to students. These include learning social and emotional skills, healthy meals, and exercise and mental health support.

The statement also called on Congress and the administration to provide federal resources that schools will need to reopen.

Reopening safely, they said, will require new investments in schools and campuses, and they need to “ensure that inadequate funding does not stand in the way of safely educating and caring for children in our schools.”

They describe withholding funds from schools that do not open for in-person learning full-time “misguided approach,” and state that it would put schools who do not have adequate resources in a position that would threaten the health of students and teachers.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta discusses school openings this fall:

10:31 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

New data shows remdesivir reduces Covid-19 patients' risk of dying, but finding "requires confirmation"

From CNN Health’s John Bonifield

Drugmaker Gilead Sciences released new data on Friday that suggests the drug remdesivir can help hospitalized Covid-19 patients recover faster and reduce their risk of dying. However, the company said the mortality finding requires confirmation by clinical trials.

The analysis compared 312 patients treated with remdesivir as part of a clinical trial to a separate group of 818 patients who didn't receive the antiviral drug. 

In the analysis, treatment with remdesivir reduced risk of death by 62% compared to the current standard of care. The mortality rate for patients treated with remdesivir was 7.6% versus 12.5% for those not treated with the drug.

The analysis also showed that 74.4% of remdesivir-treated patients recovered by 14 days compared to 59% of patients in the other group. 

The findings will be presented Friday as part of a Covid-19 conference at AIDS 2020, the 23rd International AIDS Conference. The data has not been published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. 

“While not as vigorous as a randomized controlled trial, this analysis importantly draws from a real world setting and serves as an important adjunct to clinical trial data, adding to our collective understanding of this virus and reflecting the extraordinary pace of the ongoing pandemic," Dr. Susan Olender, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, said in the company's press release. 

Previously released data about remdesivir showed the drug helped coronavirus patients recover four days faster.

That study suggested patients taking remdesivir might be less likely to die, but there was not a statistically significant difference between those who were treated with the drug and those who were not.

10:38 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

Trump's on his way to Florida. Here's the latest on the coronavirus pandemic in the state.

President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on July 10 before traveling to Florida.
President Donald Trump arrives to board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland on July 10 before traveling to Florida. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump just left the White House, and he's making his way to Florida for a fundraiser and a briefing on drug trafficking in South America.

Coronavirus cases have been surging in Florida, and the state has become one of the new epicenters of the pandemic. Here's what you need to know about the virus in the Sunshine State:

  • Records shattered: Florida has been reporting high numbers of new cases each day. On Saturday, the Sunshine State reported more than 11,400 new cases — the most reported in a single day, beating the previous record that was set just three days before that.
  • The situation around Miami: The state's coronavirus hotspot is Miami-Dade County, Florida, where ICU beds are scarce and the percent positivity rate of coronavirus cases is over 33%. 
  • Schools to reopen: Earlier this week, Florida accounted all "brick and mortar schools" would be required to open "at least five days per week for all students" this fall. Some teachers in the state said that decision could be deadly.

Here's a look at the latest numbers from across the state:

CNN on the ground in Florida:

10:20 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

Fauci: "We've got to do some serious reaching out" to communities of color about Covid-19 vaccine

From CNN's Health Gisela Crespo

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, reiterated that efforts are underway to educate people about the importance of getting a Covid-19 vaccine when it becomes available.

In an interview with the Financial Times published Friday, Fauci said he's especially concerned about communities of color that have been more vulnerable to the virus "because they’ve been mistreated by authority for a very long time.”

"We’ve got to do some serious reaching out. Because the one thing you don’t want is a vaccine that protects people who are not nearly as vulnerable as the ones you want to protect,” Fauci told FT.

Fauci has been vocal about the racial disparities that the pandemic has brought to light.

At a hearing last month, Fauci told members of Congress that institutional racism contributes to a "double whammy" impact on African Americans, as the group is more likely to work in essential services and have a higher prevalence of underlying health conditions.

9:49 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

This Pennsylvania county has paused indoor dining after coronavirus cases rise

From CNN's Sheena Jones

A customer walks out of the Porch restaurant with his takeout order on July 9 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
A customer walks out of the Porch restaurant with his takeout order on July 9 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Gene J. Puskar/AP

Officials in Allegheny County — which includes Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania — have issued a temporary two-week order banning residents from eating inside restaurants and bars, a release from Health Department Director Dr. Debra Bogen said. 

The ban starts today. This order rescinds previous orders from June 28 and July 2, according to the release. 

This comes after the area saw an increase in Covid-19 cases. 

Restaurants are permitted to serve takeout food and alcohol and provide deliveries, the release says.

9:41 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

Australia approves remdesivir as country's first Covid-19 treatment

From journalist Isaac Yee

A vial of the drug remdesivir is seen during the press conference at the University Hospital Eppendorf on April 8 in Hamburg, Germany.
A vial of the drug remdesivir is seen during the press conference at the University Hospital Eppendorf on April 8 in Hamburg, Germany. Ulrich Perrey/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) announced on Friday in a statement that it had granted provisional approval to remdesivir as the first treatment option for the novel coronavirus in Australia.

“Remdesivir is the most promising treatment option so far to reduce hospitalization time for those suffering from severe coronavirus infections,” TGA said in a statement published on their website.

The statement added that the drug "offers the potential to reduce the strain on Australia's health care system. By reducing recovery times patients will be able to leave hospital earlier, freeing beds for those in need.”

“While this is a major milestone in Australia's struggle against the pandemic, it is important to emphasize that the product has not been shown to prevent coronavirus infection or relieve milder cases of infection,” TGA said.

The statement continued: “Australia is one of the first regulators to authorize the use of Remdesivir for the treatment of COVID-19, following on from recent approvals in European Union, Japan, and Singapore,” said the Administration adding that “international regulatory cooperation played a significant role, as the European Medicines Agency and the Singapore Health Sciences Authority generously shared their review reports with TGA at an early stage.”

9:28 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

Inside a California hospital battling the worst of Covid-19 on the US-Mexico border

From CNN's Kyung Lah, Julia Jones and Kim Berryman

A nurse attends to a coronavirus patient at El Centro Regional Medical Center in El Centro, California.
A nurse attends to a coronavirus patient at El Centro Regional Medical Center in El Centro, California. CNN

Coronavirus is winning the battle in El Centro, California. It's in almost every patient in the hospital. Tents are being put up to handle even more cases. It's on the streets, forcing rescuers to put on protective suits and cumbersome masks before they approach people needing help.

And it's not stopping. Even as nearby and faraway facilities take patients to try to ease the load, more and more sick people keep coming. And so do the deaths. The workers are exhausted. The virus is not.

CNN takes you inside the hospital:

Read the full story here.

9:29 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

Fewer than 1,000 ICU beds are available statewide in Texas

From CNN's Kay Jones

Healthcare workers move a patient in the Covid-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas, on July 2.
Healthcare workers move a patient in the Covid-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas, on July 2. Mark Felix/AFP/Getty Images

There are less than 1,000 ICU beds available throughout the state of Texas, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS).

Additionally, there are 9,869 Covid-19 positive patients hospitalized in Texas. The latest chart by DSHS shows that this is a record number of hospitalizations and that they have steadily increased since mid-June. 

On Thursday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued a proclamation that amends his Executive Order issued in late June adding all counties in the 11 Trauma Service Areas in the state requiring suspension of all elective surgeries in hospitals. A total of 113 of the state's 254 counties fall under the Executive Order and subsequent proclamation. 

Texas currently has at least 230,346 cases reported, with an estimated 109,102 active cases, according to the latest numbers released by DSHS.

Note: These numbers were released by Texas Department of State Health Services, and may not line up exactly in real time with CNN’s database drawn from Johns Hopkins University and the Covid Tracking Project.

9:23 a.m. ET, July 10, 2020

Fauci "trying to figure out" where Trump got false claim that 99% of Covid-19 cases are "harmless"

From CNN's Gisela Crespo

 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies before a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on June 30 in Washington, DC.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies before a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on June 30 in Washington, DC. Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said he's "trying to figure out" where President Trump got the number behind his claim that 99% of coronavirus cases were "harmless." 

"I’m trying to figure out where the President got that number," Fauci said in an interview with the Financial Times, published Friday. "What I think happened is that someone told him that the general mortality is about 1%. And he interpreted, therefore, that 99% is not a problem, when that’s obviously not the case.”

About this: Last week, Trump sought to downplay the surge in Covid-19 cases by falsely claiming that testing in the US shows 99% of cases "are totally harmless."

Fauci told FT he last saw Trump on June 2 at the White House, and hasn't personally briefed him in at least two months.