July 28 coronavirus news

By Nectar Gan, Adam Renton, Ed Upright, Melissa Macaya, Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 12:10 a.m. ET, July 29, 2020
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10:21 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

Air traffic will not return to 2019 levels until 2024, air industry association says

From CNN's Eoin McSweeney in London

Passengers check their flight information on screens at the Josep Tarradellas Barcelona-El Prat airport in El Prat de Llobregat on July 6.
Passengers check their flight information on screens at the Josep Tarradellas Barcelona-El Prat airport in El Prat de Llobregat on July 6. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images

Air traffic will not return to 2019 levels until 2024, later than previously predicted, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) said in a news conference on Tuesday. 

Despite a slight upturn, air travel in June was surprisingly weak and a much faster rebound had been expected, IATA said.

There was almost no recovery in Europe and passenger numbers remain at all-time lows. Traffic is not growing as quickly as airlines are adding capacity, leading to greater cash burn.

IATA expressed concern business travel levels will never return to pre-Covid-19 levels. New technologies and working from home could mean businesses cut back permanently on travel. Over the next couple of years, cargo could replace business travel as a major source of revenue. 

 Testing is one of IATA's preferred solutions to imposing quarantine, which it reiterated this week after the UK's sudden decision to reintroduce such measures for travelers arriving from Spain. 

"We are in favor of introducing testing, especially between countries that have a different level of infection," Alexandre de Juniac, IATA's Director General and CEO, said. "But we do not see for the moment the testing system ready to accommodate the constraints of air travel."

9:58 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

US stocks open lower

From CNN’s Anneken Tappe

US stocks fell at the opening bell in New York, retracing the prior session’s gains.

Stocks climbed Monday on hopes for Washington’s next pandemic stimulus package. But on Tuesday, investors are grappling with earnings again, with big consumer names like McDonald’s missing estimates.

Here's how the market opened:

  • The Dow opened 0.3%, or 85 points, lower.
  • The S&P 500 fell 0.1%.
  • The Nasdaq Composite kicked off 0.2% lower.

9:44 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

Funding for Covid-19 testing should be government's responsibility, airline industry says

From CNN's Greg Wallace

International Air Transport Association Director General and CEO Alexandre de Juniac speaks during the IATA global media day on December 8, 2014 in Geneva.
International Air Transport Association Director General and CEO Alexandre de Juniac speaks during the IATA global media day on December 8, 2014 in Geneva. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

The airline industry wants testing for passengers on international flights to be funded by governments, the head of the International Air Transport Association (IATA) said Tuesday. 

IATA chief Alexandre de Juniac told reporters on a conference call that IATA believes testing “is very helpful” to prevent the spread of the coronavirus through travel, but it is concerned the cost of testing “could be a barrier to air travel if it was to be paid by the passengers.” 

“The contribution of the airlines is to have – to organize the testing with the airports, within the airport area to ensure that when the passenger comes to an airplane, he enters into a kind of safe bubble in which everybody will have been tested and tested negative,” de Juniac said. 

The testing would be a “kind of insurance that passengers who are flying are not infected, and that would minimize significantly the rate of virus transmission.” 

Executives with four major airlines – American, United, British Airways, and Lufthansa – recently asked US and European governments to reopen transatlantic travel without quarantine periods with a testing program. Those four airlines are IATA members.    

A coalition of U.S.-based airlines is also pushing the US Transportation Security Administration to begin government-organized temperature checking program. 

9:24 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

Real Madrid player tests positive for Covid-19

From CNN’s Aleks Klosok and Patrick Sung in London

Mariano Diaz of Real Madrid runs during a match between Real Betis Sevilla and Real Madrid at the Estadio Benito Villamarin on March 8 in Sevilla Spain.
Mariano Diaz of Real Madrid runs during a match between Real Betis Sevilla and Real Madrid at the Estadio Benito Villamarin on March 8 in Sevilla Spain. Eric Verhoeven/Soccrates/Getty Images

Real Madrid forward Mariano has tested positive for Covid-19, the newly crowned La Liga champions announced on Tuesday.

“After the COVID-19 tests carried out yesterday on our first team footballers by the Real Madrid Medical Services, our player Mariano, tested positive,” read a statement.

“The player is in perfect health and is complying with the protocol of isolation at home," the statement added.

The Spanish-born forward was an unused substitute for Real Madrid’s last match – a 2-2 draw in La Liga away at Leganes – on Sunday, July 19.

Real Madrid is scheduled to play at Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium in the second leg of their UEFA Champions League – Round of 16 tie on Friday, August 7.

Manchester City holds a 2-1 lead after the first leg which was played at Real Madrid’s Santiago Bernabeu stadium in February before the pandemic caused the competition to be halted.

9:13 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

"We just can't afford" another Covid-19 surge, Fauci says

From CNN Health’s Naomi Thomas

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious disease, discussed the surges in southern states, and how to hopefully avoid future surges through careful reopening, on ABC’s “Good Morning America” on Tuesday.

“Obviously, the southern states that really had a major surge,” Fauci said, naming Florida, Texas, Arizona and California. "They appear, I hope, and it looks like they may be cresting and coming back down.”

Fauci said that what he was concerned about, and something that Dr. Deborah Birx has also mentioned, was other states, such as Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee and Kentucky, “that are starting to have that very early indication that the percent of cases regarding the number of tests you have – that the percent is starting to go up.”

“That’s a surefire sign that you’ve got to be really careful." Fauci said.

“If you are trying to open up, please do it in a way that’s in accordance with the guidelines,” Fauci added.

If guidelines are followed carefully, as well as the fundamentals that Fauci outlined earlier – which include mask wearing, social distancing, closing bars in areas where there is viral activity, avoiding crowds and practicing hand hygiene – “I think we can prevent the surges that we’ve seen in the southern states,” he said. “Because we just can’t afford, yet again, another surge.”

When asked whether there should be a coordinated national strategy for reopening, as some state governors have said they will not go along with plans that have been laid out by the administration, and the President has said that some states should be thinking about reopening, Fauci said that the guidelines “the way we put them out some time ago, that really is the national strategy.”

These recommendations say that if you’re at a certain level, wait until you have a period of time over 14 days where it comes down, Fauci said, then continue to move through the phases, once the preceding one has been successfully achieved.

“Obviously, as you mentioned, some states are not doing that,” Fauci said. “We would hope that they all now rethink at what happens when you don’t adhere to that. We’ve seen it in plain sight in the southern states that surged, so we’ve got to get back to a very prudent advance from one stage to another.”

9:10 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

Miami is offering free Covid-19 testing for children

From CNN’s Rosa Flores and Sara Weisfeldt

As the number of Covid-19 infections in Floridian children rise, the City of Miami in partnership with the University of Miami are offering free testing for children of all ages, according to a press release by the university.

The testing will be offered at Curtis Park using UM’s Pediatric Mobile Clinic. Testing is by appointment only from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time from Monday, August 3 through Friday, August 7.

9:41 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

CNN wants to hear about your biggest education concerns

From CNN's Melissa Mahtani

We want to hear your biggest education concerns and any questions you may have for a special coronavirus podcast series starting Friday with Dr. Sanjay Gupta. Share your thoughts below.

9:07 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

Madrid makes mask use mandatory

From CNN’s Laura Pérez Maestro in Spain 

Pedestrians wearing face masks walk past a shop window in Madrid, Spain, on Tuesday, July 28.
Pedestrians wearing face masks walk past a shop window in Madrid, Spain, on Tuesday, July 28. Mariscal/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

The President of the Madrid regional government, Isabel Díaz Ayuso, announced at a news conference on Tuesday that the use of masks will be mandatory in Madrid in all indoor and outdoor spaces, including bar and restaurant terraces.

The number of people meeting at these terraces will be limited to just 10, the same limit should be observed at private parties and meetings as well. The new measures will take effect starting Thursday.

"Anyone attending will be registered and will have to provide ID an telephone numbers to ease tracing in case it is necessary," she highlighted.

The health counselor for the region, Enrique Ruiz Escudero, explained at the news conference that there has been a change in trend, with 500 infections registered this weekend, most of them in people under the age of 40.

On that issue, Ayuso warned: “We are concerned about the behavior of many young people, not of all but of many, and it is important that they understand that they are also transmitters of the epidemic, that many have also fallen ill in these last few months, and above all, that they are putting in danger the lives of their neighbors, their relatives, but also their professional and academic future, if we continue having to fight the virus eternally”.

She made an appeal to young people in Madrid to join this cause and change the trend. 

Other measures: Ayuso also announced the creation of what she has called the "Covid record card," similar to a vaccination card in which it will be registered whether a person has had the disease and has antibodies.

The objective is "to avoid confinement and be able to access gyms, museums, cinemas or any indoor place. The key is that people that can’t spread the virus can continue with their normal lives and take precautions to protect the most vulnerable”. 

These new measures taken by the capital mean that the use of masks are now mandatory in public places in the whole of Spain with the exception of the Canary Islands.

9:08 a.m. ET, July 28, 2020

Fauci "cautiously optimistic" about phase 3 Moderna vaccine trial

From CNN's Health Gisela Crespo

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on June 30 in Washington, DC.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on June 30 in Washington, DC. Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images)

Following the announcement that the phase three clinical trial of a coronavirus vaccine – developed by Moderna and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases – has begun in the US, Dr. Anthony Fauci again said he is "cautiously optimistic" there will be an answer on whether a vaccine will work in the late fall or early winter.

Speaking Tuesday on Good Morning America, the nation's leading expert on infectious disease explained the results from the phase one trial were "enough for us to see the kind of response that this vaccine induces in individual[s]. And it induced the level of antibodies – which are the proteins that fight the virus – at a level that was quite high, in the sense of what was comparable if not better than what we see in the recovery from natural infection.”

 "That's really one of the issues when you're dealing with vaccines. If you can induce a response that's least as good as natural infection, that is a good predictor that you're going to have a vaccine that works. Obviously, the proof of the pudding is you've got to do the trial," Fauci added.

The large Moderna trial "will give us the answer and, yes, I am cautiously optimistic that as we get into the late fall and early winter, we will have an answer – and I believe it will be positive," Fauci told ABC's George Stephanopoulos.

More on the trial: The investigational vaccine was developed by the biotechnology company Moderna and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. The trial is to be conducted at nearly 100 US research sites, according to Moderna. The first patient was dosed at a site in Savannah, Georgia.

The trial is expected to enroll about 30,000 adult volunteers and evaluates the safety of the Moderna/NIH vaccine and whether it can prevent symptomatic Covid-19 after two doses, among other outcomes.

Volunteers will receive either two 100-microgram injections of the vaccine or a placebo about 28 days apart. Investigators and participants will not know who has received the vaccine.