September 4 coronavirus news

By Helen Regan, Brett McKeehan, Amy Woodyatt, Meg Wagner and Melissa Macaya, CNN

Updated 12:11 a.m. ET, September 5, 2020
18 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
7:13 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

Key model predicts 410,000 US Covid-19 deaths by January

From CNN's Marcelo Garate

Jeffrey Rhodes, a funeral home director applies makeup for man who died of COVID-19 before his funeral at Ray Williams Funeral Home on August 12, in Tampa, Florida.
Jeffrey Rhodes, a funeral home director applies makeup for man who died of COVID-19 before his funeral at Ray Williams Funeral Home on August 12, in Tampa, Florida. Octavio Jones/Getty Images

A model often cited by top health officials dramatically raised its projections for US Covid-19 deaths Friday morning, predicting over 410,000 deaths by January 1 -- which would mean another 224,000 Americans lost in just the next four months.

The model from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation points to declining mask use in some regions from a peak in usage in early August. The scenarios in the model suggest 122,000 of those lives could be saved with near-universal mask use. Conversely, the model warns the death toll could be much higher -- over 620,000 -- if all restrictions are eased.

“If a herd immunity strategy is pursued, meaning no further government intervention is taken from now to Jan 1st, the death toll could increase to 620,000," according to IHME’s briefing.

IHME expects the death rate to reach an unprecedented 3,000 a day by December, due in part to “declining vigilance of the public.”

The IHME model, which is more aggressive in its predictions than others, comes a day after a new CDC ensemble forecast predicted 211,000 US deaths from Covid-19 by September 26.

 Dr. Sanjay Gupta explains:

5:57 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

No cause for "concern" over Berlusconi health after positive Covid-19 result

From CNN's Valentina DiDonato in Rome

A view of the San Raffaele hospital where former Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi is admitted, in Milan, Italy, on Friday, September 4.
A view of the San Raffaele hospital where former Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi is admitted, in Milan, Italy, on Friday, September 4. Claudio Furlan/LaPresse via AP

There is no cause for “concern” over the health of Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, his representatives told CNN.

The 83-year-old former PM and media magnate was admitted to hospital Thursday with mild coronavirus symptoms and subsequently tested positive.

Berlusconi was prime minister four times for a total of nine years, and has been the subject of multiple corruption, fraud and bribery trials.

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi
Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

“Berlusconi, after the appearance of some symptoms, was admitted to the San Raffale hospital in Milan as a precaution. The clinical picture does not cause concern,” Berlusconi’s spokesperson told CNN.

5:29 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

South Korea extends strict social distancing measures for another week in the greater Seoul area

From CNN's Yoonjung Seo in Seoul

Customers wearing face masks collect their orders as chairs and tables are stacked together as part of social distancing efforts inside a cafe in Seoul, on August 31.
Customers wearing face masks collect their orders as chairs and tables are stacked together as part of social distancing efforts inside a cafe in Seoul, on August 31. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

South Korea is extending its strict social distancing measures for the greater Seoul Metropolitan area for one more week until September 13, the country's Health Minister Park Neung-hoo said in a briefing today.

"The government feels it's necessary to extend these measures until the new daily numbers visibly drop so that our epidemiological investigation and medical system capacity can handle the situation," Park explained.

The current restrictions were due to expire this Sunday.

All kindergartens and schools except some high school classes in the greater Seoul Metropolitan area will continue to hold online classes for two more weeks until September 20, the Education Ministry's Vice Minister Park Baek-beom said in a separate briefing.

All restaurants and bakeries will continue to stop eat-in services between 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. local time, and gyms and indoor sporting facilities will be closed for one more week due to this decision.

The rest of South Korea, where level-two social distancing measures are implemented, will maintain the restrictions for two more weeks from September 9 until September 20, Park said. However, local authorities can adjust the duration of restrictions.

What level-two social distancing means: Indoor gatherings are limited to 50 people and outdoor gatherings to 100. Churches nationwide will be strongly advised to hold online services by local authorities, Park added.

South Korea reported 198 new coronavirus cases from Thursday, of which 189 are local cases, and nine are imported, according to the press release by the South Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) on Friday. South Korea currently has 20,842 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 331 deaths from the virus.

5:27 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

It's the worst disaster of the pandemic. But WHO chief says our lack of concern shows "moral bankruptcy"

From CNN's Emma Reynolds

They are among the greatest victims of coronavirus, yet elderly people continue to be dismissed, despite growing evidence of the devastating effects the pandemic has had on them.

Earlier this week, World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said he had heard people describing high Covid-19 death rates among older people as "fine."

No, when the elderly are dying it's not fine. It's a moral bankruptcy," he told a news conference. "Every life, whether it's young or old, is precious and we have to do everything to save it."

WHO figures from last week show that almost 88% of all deaths in Europe were among people aged 65 and over. And almost half of all deaths linked to Covid-19 globally have taken place in care homes, according to the Long-Term Care Covid (LTCcovid) network at the London School of Economics.

But despite vast numbers of elderly people dying of coronavirus -- and a significant drop in the quality of life of many of those forced to self-isolate -- the global response to the risks they face in the era of Covid-19 has often been chilling.

Read the full story:

4:24 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

US lawmakers want e-cigarettes banned from college campuses this fall due to coronavirus

From CNN's Faith Karimi and Steve Almasy

United States lawmakers are reiterating a call for universities and college campuses to prohibit tobacco use this fall due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

In a letter to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Democratic lawmakers urged the federal health agency to review its Covid-19 guidelines and recommend no smoking, vaping or chewing tobacco in schools. 

The letter cites a study suggesting that young people who've used e-cigarettes can be five times more likely to be diagnosed with Covid-19. Stanford University researchers published the report last month in the Journal of Adolescent Health. 

"Following the Stanford study, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) announced that it was banning tobacco use on campus in the fall ... In making that decision, UNLV took into account that if someone is smoking, vaping, or chewing tobacco, they cannot be complying with requirements to wear a mask," Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi and Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin wrote in the letter.

With the public health risk posed by coronavirus, they said, the CDC should "act quickly and forcefully."

Read the full story:

4:02 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

New Zealand reports first Covid-19 death in more than three months

From CNN's Chandler Thornton and Julia Hollingsworth

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

New Zealand reported its first Covid-19 death in more than three months on Friday, according to its health ministry.

The ministry reported the man in his 50s was linked to the August Auckland cluster.

New Zealand's last reported death from the virus was on May 28. The country's death toll from Covid-19 now stands at 23.

"It’s with a very heavy heart we acknowledge that COVID-19 has taken the life of someone in our community. Our thoughts are with this person’s family and whānau," the NZ government tweeted.

3:23 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

US reports more than 36,500 new coronavirus cases

From CNN's Joe Sutton

The United States reported 6,506 new Covid-19 cases and 1,070 deaths on Thursday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

There are at least 6,150,016 cases of the virus in the US and at least 186,790 people have died, JHU said.

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases. 

CNN's map is tracking the US cases:

3:02 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

India reports more than 83,000 cases for second consecutive day

From CNN's Manveena Suri in New Delhi

Relatives wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) as a precaution lower the body of a COVID-19 victim for burial at a graveyard in New Delhi, India.
Relatives wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) as a precaution lower the body of a COVID-19 victim for burial at a graveyard in New Delhi, India. Manish Rajput/SOPA Images/Sipa/AP

India reported 83,341 new Covid-19 cases on Friday, another highest daily increase for the country, according to the Indian Health Ministry.

It follows 83,337 Covid-19 cases reported on Thursday.

The nation's caseload now stands at 3,936,747, with least 3,037,151 of those making recoveries, according to the health ministry.

India also recorded 1,096 new coronavirus-related fatalities on Friday, bringing the confirmed nationwide death toll to 68,472.

2:06 a.m. ET, September 4, 2020

New Zealand to remain at Alert Level 2 until September 16

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern looks on at the Manukau Institute of Technology on September 3, in Auckland, New Zealand. Hannah Peters/Getty Images
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern looks on at the Manukau Institute of Technology on September 3, in Auckland, New Zealand. Hannah Peters/Getty Images Hannah Peters/Getty Images

New Zealand will remain at Alert Level 2 until September 16 to reduce the risk of coronavirus spread, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced in a press conference Friday.

"There's still a chance of spread outside of Auckland. If that does happen. Level Two ceilings lessen the impact of any spread. That means we avoid further fall out," Ardern said.

What is Alert Level 2: Face coverings are mandatory on public transportation and no more than 100 people are allowed at gatherings. 

Auckland remains at Level 2.5, allowing for no more than 10 people at gatherings, after the city was linked to a Covid-19 cluster in August.

"At this stage, the Auckland cluster remains contained and there is no indication at this stage that Auckland needs, for instance, to move back to level three," Ardern said.

The government will reevaluate alert levels on September 14, the Prime Minister added. 

New Zealand has 1,413 confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus after reporting five new cases Friday. Of the new cases, two were imported and under the age of nine years old, the government said.