September 7 coronavirus news

By Ben Westcott, Adam Renton, Amy Woodyatt, Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 12:00 a.m. ET, September 8, 2020
22 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
9:24 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Mexico has the world's 4th highest coronavirus death toll

From CNN’s Natalie Gallon in Mexico City

Workers unload coffins from a truck outside a funeral home in Mexico City on August 20.
Workers unload coffins from a truck outside a funeral home in Mexico City on August 20. Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico has the world’s fourth highest coronavirus death toll, but remains No. 8 on the list of most-infected countries globally.

Mexico announced 232 new deaths on Sunday, taking the total death toll to 67,558, the world’s fourth highest count of coronavirus deaths, following the US, Brazil and India, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Mexico also recorded at least 4,614 new coronavirus cases on Sunday, taking the country’s total case count to at least 634,023. 

Mexico therefore has the world’s eighth highest count of total Covid-19 cases, and the fourth-highest number of cases in Latin America proper, following Brazil, Peru and Colombia, according to Johns Hopkins University.

9:29 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Likelihood US will have Covid-19 vaccine available this year is "extremely low," former FDA head says

From CNN Health's Jacqueline Howard

A person receives an injection while taking part in a vaccine trial at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Florida, on August 13.
A person receives an injection while taking part in a vaccine trial at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Florida, on August 13. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

It's unlikely the United States will have a Covid-19 vaccine available for widespread use this year, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on CBS' Face the Nation on Sunday.

"The likelihood that we're going to have a vaccine for widespread use in 2020 is extremely low. I think we need to think of that as largely a 2021 event, and if we do have a vaccine available in 2020, it's likely to be used in a much more targeted fashion – almost in a therapeutic sense, to protect very high-risk populations," Gottlieb told CBS anchor John Dickerson.

"In terms of thinking about the vaccine, at least as far as this year is concerned – in 2020, the fall and the winter – I think that if there is a vaccine made available, it's likely to be a very staged introduction of the vaccine under an emergency use authorization, where there's going to be a lot of data collection around the use of that vaccine," Gottlieb said.

"And it's just going to be very select groups of people who are either at very high risk of contracting the coronavirus because of what they do. For example, health care workers, or very high risk of a bad outcome – think of people for example in a nursing home," Gottlieb said. "So you can almost think of the vaccine being used in a therapeutic sense to try to protect very high-risk populations, and not in a way we traditionally think about a vaccine in terms of trying to provide broad-based immunity in a population and really quell an epidemic."

8:50 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Miami Mayor says mask mandate is the "single biggest weapon" in fighting coronavirus

Miami Mayor Francis Suarez speaks with CNN on Monday, September 7.
Miami Mayor Francis Suarez speaks with CNN on Monday, September 7. CNN

Miami Mayor Francis Suarez said the coronavirus situation in his city has "stabilized" after local officials implemented a number of measures, including curfews and a mandate to wear masks in public.

"For me, the mask-in-public rule is the single biggest weapon that we could use to try to get the numbers down," he said on CNN's "New Day."

Suarez said the mask mandate will likely be needed through flu season because flu and coronavirus threats at the same time "could potentially create another wave."

Watch more:

9:56 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

US is heading into fall with "a lot of infection" from coronavirus, former FDA head warns

From CNN Health's Jacqueline Howard

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb speaks at the Newseum on March 6, 2019 in Washington, DC. 
FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb speaks at the Newseum on March 6, 2019 in Washington, DC.  Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The upcoming fall and winter seasons will be "more difficult" for controlling the coronavirus in the United States, which already has "a lot of infection," Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, said on CBS' Face the Nation on Sunday.

"We're heading into a more difficult season. We're heading into the fall and the winter, when we would expect a respiratory pathogen like a coronavirus to start spreading more aggressively than it would in the summer time," Gottlieb told CBS anchor John Dickerson.

"If you look at where we are heading into Labor Day, relative to where we were heading into Memorial Day, we have an equivalent amount – if not more infection – heading into Labor Day right now," Gottlieb added.

"Looking at Memorial Day, we had about 40,000 people hospitalized, we were diagnosing about 21,000 new cases a day, and we had about 1100 deaths," Gottlieb added. "As of yesterday, we had about 35,000 people hospitalized. We're diagnosing about 40,000 infections a day. On a seven-day moving average, we have about 850 tragic deaths a day. So that's a lot of infection to be taking into a season when we know a respiratory pathogen is going to want to spread more aggressively."

Months into the pandemic, people across the United States are "exhausted," Gottlieb said. He warned that there might be a reduction in mask-wearing and social distancing heading into the fall because of that fatigue.

"People are exhausted. People have been social distancing and wearing masks and staying home for a long period of time right now. Small businesses are hurting," Gottlieb said. "So I think that people's willingness to comply with the simple things that we know can reduce spread is going to start to fray as we head into the fall and the winter – and that's another challenge, trying to keep up our vigilance at a time when we know this can spread more aggressively."

 

8:30 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Nearly 1 million travelers at US airports were screened on Friday

From CNN's Pete Muntean:

The number of air travelers climbed going into the Labor holiday weekend – enough to set a new pandemic-era high.  

The Transportation Security Administration said it screened 968,673 people on Friday of Labor Day weekend. For comparison, the agency saw nearly 2.2 million people on the same weekday a year ago.

On Saturday, the amount of travelers were far less: TSA only screened 664,640 people compared to 1.7 million the year before. 

8:30 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

It's Labor Day in the US, and people celebrated with large events all weekend long

From CNN's Madeline Holcombe

People gather on the beach on September 6 in Santa Monica, California.
People gather on the beach on September 6 in Santa Monica, California. Apu Gomes/AFP/Getty Images

Labor Day celebrations were in full swing this weekend — and many included the large crowds of people health experts feared would form.

Many gathered in large groups on Saturday. In San Francisco, city officials announced on Sunday morning they would be closing the parking lot at Ocean Beach after a gathering celebrating Burning Man culture attracted a big crowd. More than 1,000 people flocked to the event at the beach, according to San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who called the gathering "reckless and selfish."

Throngs of people were expected at Tybee Island beaches in Georgia over the weekend, CNN affiliate WTOC reported. And images from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, showed umbrellas lined up side-by-side down the beach.

And in Atlanta, many weekend Labor Day parties were on the schedule, including "The Biggest Labor Day Weekend Party in the City" hosted by rapper Gucci Mane and a "Sunday Funday" rooftop party advertised with an image of people standing close together, some without masks.

In the days leading up to the holiday weekend, experts including Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, urged people should continue to keep distance, wear masks and avoid groups as they enjoy the weekend.

7:25 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

A 1,000-person gathering to celebrate Burning Man culture put people's lives at risk, San Francisco mayor says

From CNN's Madeline Holcombe

More than 1,000 people gathered at San Francisco's Ocean Beach on Saturday to celebrate Burning Man culture, according to the mayor, who shut down the beach's parking lot in response.

"This was absolutely reckless and selfish," Mayor London Breed tweeted on Sunday. "You are not celebrating. You are putting people's lives at risk. You are putting our progress at risk. No one is immune from spreading the virus."

The gathering on the beach was one of many large congregations over Labor Day weekend that went against recommendations.

Though it was specifically celebrating Burning Man, the event's organizers -- who held a livestream of the annual tradition of burning a wooden effigy Saturday -- said they were neither aware of it nor involved in its planning.

Burning Man is a nine-day festival that usually brings in crowds of 80,000 for eclectic costumes, art installations and musical performances. It was scheduled to begin August 30 this year, but organizers canceled the event in April due to the coronavirus.

But people gathered on Saturday anyway in San Francisco, and video from Craig Fowler showed a large group dancing in front of a stage with a DJ and another showed fire dancers on the beach.

Read the full story here:

6:21 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Two Manchester City players test positive for Covid-19

From CNN’s Richard Parr in London

Manchester City players Riyad Mahrez and Aymeric Laporte
Manchester City players Riyad Mahrez and Aymeric Laporte Getty Images

Manchester City footballers Riyad Mahrez and Aymeric Laporte have tested positive for Covid-19, the club announced on Monday.

"Manchester City FC can confirm that Riyad Mahrez and Aymeric Laporte have tested positive for Covid-19," the club announced in a statement on their website.

"Both players are currently observing a period of self-isolation in accordance with Premier League and UK Government protocol on quarantine," the club said.

Neither is said to be displaying symptoms of the virus.

Last season, Manchester City finished second in the English Premier League.

The new season starts in five days' time, on Saturday 12 September, but City’s involvement in the UEFA Champions League means they aren't due to begin their 2020-21 campaign until September 21, with an away match at Wolverhampton Wanderers.

6:06 a.m. ET, September 7, 2020

It's just after 11 a.m. in London and 3.30 p.m. in New Delhi. Here's the latest on the pandemic.

A medical worker takes a swab from a resident of Mumbai, India, for a coronavirus test on September 7.
A medical worker takes a swab from a resident of Mumbai, India, for a coronavirus test on September 7. Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images

Globally, more than 27 million cases of coronavirus have been recorded, and more than 889,000 people have died, according to Johns Hopkins University. Here's the latest on the pandemic.

India reaches a grim milestone: India has surpassed Brazil as the country with the second-highest number of confirmed Covid-19 cases, after reporting a daily high of 90,802 new infections on Monday.

India's total number of cases stands at 4,204,613, according to the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. By comparison, Brazil has confirmed 4,137,521 cases, according to Johns Hopkins University. 

India is the world's second most populous nation, home to more than 1.3 billion people -- more than six times the population of Brazil.

The United States remains the country with the highest number of recorded cases -- more than 6.27 million cases -- according to figures from JHU. 

Harris criticizes Trump administration's coronavirus response: Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris attacked the Trump administration for "minimizing the seriousness" of the coronavirus outbreak and failing to do enough for millions of Americans struggling to make ends meet.

"There is no question that Donald Trump has been an abject failure and incompetent when it comes to addressing the severe job loss that has happened as a result of the pandemic, because he has failed to address the pandemic itself," Harris told CNN's Dana Bash in an exclusive "State of the Union" interview on Sunday.

"We need to talk about how the economy is doing based on how working people are doing," she said. "And right now, working people are suffering."

South Korea wants one test for coronavirus and flu: South Korea is developing a testing kit that can detect seasonal flu and Covid-19 at the same time, according to the country's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC).

As symptoms of Covid-19 and seasonal flu are similar it's important to detect the difference for the coming fall flu season, KCDC director Jung Eun-kyeong said Monday.

The country’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety is currently going through the permit process to approve the test.

Australia signs $1.2 billion agreement for coronavirus vaccine: Australians will have access to a free Covid-19 vaccine at some point in 2021 if trials prove successful, after the government signed a supply and production deal worth $1.7 billion Australian dollars ($1.2 billion) for tens of millions of doses.

Under the agreement, the University of Oxford/AstraZeneca and the University of Queensland/CSL will provide at least 84.8 million doses of their potential vaccines, according to an Australian government statement today.

UK looking at options to reduce 14 day quarantine period: The UK Government is looking at options for reducing the 14-day quarantine period for travelers to around one week, the country's Health Secretary Matt Hancock said.

Visitors arriving in the UK from certain countries are required to self-isolate for 14 days -- though the exact restrictions differ in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.