September 7 coronavirus news

By Ben Westcott, Adam Renton, Amy Woodyatt, Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 12:00 a.m. ET, September 8, 2020
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6:31 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

This elementary school teacher has been helping families put food on the table during the pandemic

Margaret Norris
Margaret Norris CNN

When the pandemic started and schools went virtual, Margaret Norris, an elementary school teacher in Maryland, was worried about some kids not having enough to eat.

So with the help of her community, she got to work.

Norris said when the teachers got the news they wouldn't be coming back into the classroom, they went shopping.

"We bought what we could buy and we sent home a hundred bags of food," she told CNN on Monday. "The next week a community center that we work with had a request for more and my principal asked me how long can you do this. I put that question to my social media, and so far the answer has been six months."

Now, with the help of donations and volunteers, she has been packing up and delivering up to 150 bags of food per week for families.

Norris said she has seen first hand how hard this has been for some parents. She said she delivered food to one mom who wasn't able to keep her job because she had three young kids who were now staying home.

"I checked with her often and I take food to her home and a few weeks ago she texted me and she said I don't want you to do this anymore because I'm so ashamed... I'm so ashamed that you're spending your money to feed my children," Norris said. "I assured her that she's blessing all of us by letting us help her. Children have to eat. The thing about children is they're hungry again tomorrow, so we have to get this food out there," she added.

Her biggest piece of advice: If you want to help, it doesn't have to be a grand gesture.

"We can do little things," she said.

Watch here:

5:58 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Nearly 20% of new Covid-19 cases in Kentucky are from children ages 18 and younger

From CNN's Laura Dolan

Nearly 20% of new Covid-19 cases in Kentucky are from children ages 18 and younger, according to a news release issued by Gov. Andy Beshear’s office.

According to the governor's office, 291 new coronavirus cases were reported Monday, 52 of which were under the age of 18. The youngest is just one month old, according to the governor. 

No new deaths were reported.

Beshear attributed the dip in numbers to the holiday weekend.

“I’ll take any day we’re not announcing new deaths, but we know this is only due to less reporting because of the long holiday weekend,” the governor said. “We’ve lost nearly 1,000 of our fellow Kentuckians to this deadly virus.”  

He urged Kentuckians to keep gatherings to 10 people or fewer, wear a mask and to continue to practice social distancing.

5:31 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Bernie Sanders on coronavirus vaccine: "Let's not politicize this thing"

CNN
CNN

In the midst of comments about the timeline of a Covid-19 vaccine from both sides of the aisle, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders says the process should not be politicized.

"Let's not politicize this thing. We have developed vaccines for decade after decade after decade. We have to give the resources to the doctors and the scientists to do their work," Sanders told CNN on Monday.

"We don't want to be politicizing this thing, but we do want to move it as quickly as possible," he added.

Some background: This comes after President Trump said there could be a coronavirus vaccine "before a very special date."

While Trump did not specially mention which date, he has previously suggested that a vaccine for coronavirus could be ready before Election Day.

But, several officials have raised questions about Trump's timeline.

Moncef Slaoui, the chief adviser to Operation Warp Speed, told NPR last week that it’s “extremely unlikely, but not impossible” that a Covid-19 vaccine could be authorized for emergency use by the US Food and Drug Administration before the end of October.

Dr. Larry Corey, who’s leading a group set up by the National Institutes of Health to work on coronavirus vaccines, told CNN he also said he doesn’t think there will be a vaccine available by Election Day.

Watch here:

4:40 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

New graphics from WHO illustrate dire pandemic conditions in Americas compared to rest of world

From CNN’s Virginia Langmaid

Covid-19 cases per 1 million population reported in the last seven days by countries, territories and areas, from Aug. 3 to Sept. 6, 2020
Covid-19 cases per 1 million population reported in the last seven days by countries, territories and areas, from Aug. 3 to Sept. 6, 2020 World Health Organization

New graphics from the World Health Organization illustrate how much worse the coronavirus pandemic is in the Americas compared to other regions of the world.

The US has more cases and more deaths than any other country, with Brazil coming in for a close second.

“The United States of America and Brazil account for nearly three quarters of all COVID-19 cases in the Americas,” WHO said.

Yet President Trump continues to claim that the US case count and death counts are improving, and compare favorably to Europe’s.

How these regions compare: While the WHO Americas region and European regions have similar populations – around 1 billion for the Americans compared to 900 million for Europe – WHO’s statistics show the Americas account for 46% of all new coronavirus cases over the past seven days, and 59% or newly reported deaths.

Cumulatively, the Americas accounts for 55% of all coronavirus deaths globally, with roughly one-seventh of the total global population.

Europe, in contrast, accounts for 13% of all reported new cases over the past seven days, 8% of deaths and 25% of the global total cumulative deaths.

WHO says the Americas reported nearly 3.5 times as many new cases as reported by Europe in the last seven days. New cases in the Americas now account for 52% of cumulative cases worldwide.

4:33 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Another federal official raises questions about Trump's vaccine timeline

From CNN's Elizabeth Cohen

Another federal official is making it clear that despite President Trump’s predictions, there’s hardly any chance a vaccine will be available to Americans by Election Day.

“I don’t know any scientist involved in this effort who thinks we will be getting shots into arms any time before Election Day,” said the official, who is familiar with Operation Warp Speed, the federal government’s effort to develop coronavirus vaccines.

Trump, however, has projected optimism for a quicker timeline.

“[It’s] going to be done in a very short period of time – could even have it during the month of October,” the President said at a news conference Monday. “We’ll have the vaccine soon, maybe before a special date. You know what date I’m talking about.”

On August 6, Trump said he was “optimistic” a vaccine would be ready by Nov. 3.

"I believe we'll have the vaccine before the end of the year, certainly, but around that date, yes. I think so," Trump said.

And at a rally last week, he said, "It will be delivered before the end of the year, in my opinion, before the end of the year, but it really might even be delivered before the end of October."

Moncef Slaoui, the chief adviser to Operation Warp Speed, told NPR last week that it’s “extremely unlikely, but not impossible” that a Covid-19 vaccine could be authorized for emergency use by the US Food and Drug Administration before the end of October.

Dr. Larry Corey, who’s leading a group set up by the National Institutes of Health to work on coronavirus vaccines, told CNN he also said he doesn’t think there will be a vaccine available by Election Day.

“I would agree with Dr. Slaoui. The chances are very low, very remote,” said Corey, who leads the COVID-19 Prevention Network.

2:57 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

More than 189,000 people have died from coronavirus in the US

From CNN's Amanda Watts

There are at least 6,292,206 cases of coronavirus in the US, and at least 189,095 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

So far on Monday, Johns Hopkins has recorded 15,841 new cases and 154 reported deaths.

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as repatriated cases. 

3:08 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Trump tries and fails to get reporter to remove mask at news conference

From CNN's Ali Main

Reuters reporter Jeff Mason asks the President a question during Monday's news conference.
Reuters reporter Jeff Mason asks the President a question during Monday's news conference. Sarah Silbiger/Reuters

In his Monday afternoon news conference, President Trump got into an exchange with Reuters correspondent Jeff Mason after Mason would not remove his face mask at the request of the President.

The President stopped Mason as he began to ask the first question, saying "you're going to have to take that off, please." He gestured to the space between the reporter and the podium, inquiring, "you're...how many feet are you away?"

Mason replied that he would just speak louder to counter the effects of the mask. 

Trump was not satisfied with this response, telling the reporter his voice was "very muffled" with the face covering, "so if you would take it off, it would be a lot easier."

Mason raised his voice and repeated his offer to speak louder, asking "is that better?"

The President sighed saying, "it's better. Yeah, it's better."

Later in the news conference, Trump remarked that one reporter who did remove his mask sounded "so clear. As opposed to everybody else, where they refuse."

This is not the first time that the President has requested a reporter take off his or her mask so that he could hear a question more clearly, but his disappointment with Mason's response was notable.

2:23 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Trump: We could have a vaccine "before a very special date"

President Trump said there could be a coronavirus vaccine "before a very special date."

While Trump did not specially mention which date, he has previously suggested that a vaccine for coronavirus could be ready before Election Day.

"President Trump is getting this vaccine in record time. By the way, if this were the Obama administration, you wouldn't have that vaccine for three years, and you probably wouldn't have it at all," Trump said today at a news conference.

"So, we're going to have a vaccine very soon. Maybe even before a very special date. You know what date I'm talking about," he added.

Facts First: It's possible that a vaccine could be approved by the Food and Drug Administration at some point in November, but there is obviously no firm timeline or guarantee that one will be. And even when one is approved, it will likely still be many months before it's widely available across the US.

You can read CNN's full fact check on Trump's previous suggestion that there could be a vaccine ready before Election Day here.

Watch here:

3:46 p.m. ET, September 7, 2020

Trump: Democrats don't want a stimulus deal because it'll help me in the election

President Donald Trump speaks from the North Portico of the White House on Monday.
President Donald Trump speaks from the North Portico of the White House on Monday. Patrick Semansky/AP

President Trump said congressional Democrats don't want to make a stimulus deal because such a deal would be beneficial to him in the November election.

"They think it's good for politics if they don't make a deal," Trump said at an ongoing Labor Day news conference

"They don't want to make a deal because they know that's good for the economy. And if they make deal that's good for the economy — and therefore, it's good for me for the election in November, Nov. 3 — and therefore, they're not going to make a deal," he added.

About the stimulus stall: Lawmakers don't appear any closer to striking a deal on additional coronavirus stimulus. Democrats are pushing for a wide-ranging, multi-trillion dollar proposal with funding for schools, rental assistance, health providers and small businesses.

Senate GOP leadership, meanwhile, has been working for weeks behind the scenes toward building internal consensus on a scaled-back, or "skinny" proposal that would include funds for education, small business, a scaled-back enhanced federal unemployment benefit and liability protections.

Watch CNN analysis here: