September 9 coronavirus news

By Helen Regan, Adam Renton, Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 12:00 a.m. ET, September 10, 2020
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3:52 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

Miami-Dade mayor extends county curfew

From CNN's Melissa Alonso

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez speaks with the news media following a news conference on Monday, Aug. 24, at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens.
Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez speaks with the news media following a news conference on Monday, Aug. 24, at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens. Lynne Sladky/AP

Miami-Dade, Florida, Mayor Carlos Giménez announced Wednesday he is loosening some restrictions in the county after a meeting with Miami Mayor Francis Suarez, Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx.

Starting Monday, Miami-Dade's 10 p.m. curfew will be pushed back one hour to 11 p.m., Giménez said. Restaurants and businesses will be allowed to serve customers for the extra hour, he said.

Anyone attending a college or professional sporting event that ends after the curfew should keep their game ticket "in case you get stopped by police when you're heading home," Giménez said.

The University of Miami Hurricanes season opener at Hard Rock Stadium is scheduled for 8 p.m. Thursday, with 13,000 socially distanced fans allowed to attend.

Zoos and animal adventure parks, like Zoo Miami and Jungle Island, can open their gates to visitors for outdoor activities starting Monday as well, Giménez said.

Playgrounds in the county will remain closed while baseball and softball will now be allowed, with some restrictions. Other amateur contact sports like football and soccer are still not allowed, the mayor said.

Rental scooters and bikes will also be allowed. Scooter companies have been asked to provide sanitizing supplies at docking stations for customers, Giménez said.

Miami-Dade is down to a 6.46% positivity rate in its 14-day average, according to Giménez.

2:02 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

White House says AstraZeneca vaccine trial pause is showing that "science is guiding the way"

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez 

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a press briefing on September 9 in Washington, DC. 
White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a press briefing on September 9 in Washington, DC.  Drew Angerer/Getty Images

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said during Wednesday’s press briefing that AstraZeneca’s recent pause on a coronavirus vaccine trial showed “science is guiding the way on a vaccine.”

McEnany called their pause “a routine response when you see an adverse effect.”

“And it was one that shows that the science is guiding the way here. And when there was an adverse response that was identified in one individual, AstraZeneca chose to pause that phase three clinical trial. There are still two American vaccines in phase three clinical trials showing great promise, but AstraZeneca, what is happening there is showing that the science is guiding the way on a vaccine,” McEnany continued.

McEnany also said that an end of year coronavirus vaccine is still the goal, despite the pause, and disputed that there was ever an Election Day deadline.

“Our timing is not about the election. It is about saving lives and by the end of the year has always been our goal, but of course a safe and effective vaccine, we will take it as quickly as we can get it,” she said.

1:36 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

Indoor dining in New York City can resume at the end of the month, governor says

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo just announced that indoor dining in New York City can resume on Sept. 30.

Restaurants must operate at 25% capacity and follow strict restrictions, including temperature-checking guests at the door and now allowing bar service.

Here's a look at all of the restrictions, according to Cuomo:

2:13 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

New York's positive infection rate has remained under 1% for 33 straight days, governor says

From CNN's Sheena Jones

Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a press conference on Wednesday, September 9.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at a press conference on Wednesday, September 9. State of New York

New York’s Covid-19 infection rate remains under 1% for 33 straight days, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday.

New York’s Covid-19 infection rate is 0.91%, Cuomo said. 

The State Liquor Authority has visited over 36,000 establishments and those restaurants have maintained a 99.2% compliance with capacity restrictions, the governor said.

“Rules are only as good as their compliance. And the compliance is only as good as the enforcement,” Cuomo said. 

One thing to note: The numbers listed were released by the state of New York and may not line up exactly in real time with CNN’s database drawn from Johns Hopkins University and the Covid Tracking Project. 

1:03 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

New York City mayor "hopeful" to have announcement this week on indoor dining

From CNN's Laura Dolan

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said he’s hopeful to have an announcement regarding indoor dining as early as this week.  

He made a similar comment last week.

The mayor said there have been a lot of conversations over the last few days with Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office and are making a lot of progress, but indoor dining has to be done safely. 

The final decision on indoor dining will be made by Cuomo who said yesterday that local governments need to have an “enforcement mechanism” in place.

“Obviously we do the enforcement here on the ground and our resources are being stretched in a lot of different directions,” said de Blasio at his news conference Wednesday. “But we’ll have to figure out a way that we feel confident about enforcement so whatever vision we come up with we can make sure it’s carefully handled here in New York City.”

The mayor noted that indoor dining is a “contributing factor” to recent spikes in Europe.

“The really important piece of this is our opportunity to do more with indoor dining is directly related to how well we do on the health picture overall. If we keep fighting back the coronavirus, more and more options open up. If the coronavirus starts to re-surge you’re not going to see a lot of things, including indoor dining," he said. 

De Blasio also said he is working to give some clarity to the restaurant industry “so they can have some option to keep going.”

De Blasio announced 220 new cases of coronavirus Wednesday with a positivity rate of 1.04%.

1:44 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

Trump wanted to play down the pandemic because he didn't "want to create a panic," according to new audio

President Trump told journalist Bob Woodward that he wanted to play down the coronavirus pandemic because he didn't want to "create a panic," according to an audio recording from Woodward's interviews.

CNN has obtained the recordings of Woodward's interviews with Trump for his new book "Rage." According to the book, Trump also knew in early February coronavirus was dangerous, highly contagious, airborne and "deadly."

Here's part of a recording from March 19:

Trump: Now it’s turning out it’s not just old people, Bob. Just today and yesterday, some startling facts came out. It’s not just old- older.   

Woodward: Yeah, exactly.  

Trump: Young people too, plenty of young people.  

Woodward: So, give me-   

Trump: So what’s going on-  

Woodward: -a moment of talking to somebody, going through this with Fauci or somebody who kind of, it caused a pivot in your mind. Because it’s clear, just from what’s on the public record that you went through a pivot on this to, ‘oh my god, the gravity is almost inexplicable and unexplainable.’  

Trump: Well I think, Bob, really, to be honest with you-  

Woodward: Sure, I want you to be.  

Trump: I wanted to- I wanted to always play it down. I still like playing it down, because I don’t want to create a panic.

WATCH:

2:15 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

Trump told Woodward Covid-19 could be 5 times more deadly than the flu. 20 days later he said "we don't know."

President Donald Trump attends a meeting in the Oval Office on September 4 in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump attends a meeting in the Oval Office on September 4 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Pool/Getty Images

According to audio Bob Woodward's interviews with President Trump for his new book "Rage," the President on Feb. 7 said coronavirus could be "more deadly" than strenuous flus.

"It goes through air, Bob. That’s always tougher than the touch. You know, the touch, you don’t have to touch things. Right? But the air, you just breathe the air and that’s how it’s passed. And so, that’s a very tricky one. That’s a very delicate one. It’s also more deadly than your – you know, your, even your strenuous flus. You know, people don’t realize, we lose 25,000, 30,000 people a year here. Who would ever think that, right?" Trumps said according to the audio.

Trump went on to say that coronavirus was maybe five times "more deadly" than the flu.

"This is more deadly. This is five per- you know, this is five percent versus one percent and less than one percent. You know? So, this is deadly stuff," Trump said, according to the audio.

But 20 days later, while speaking to reporters at the White House, Trump said "we don't know exactly" what the fatality rate of coronavirus is.

"The flu has a fatality ratio of about 1% This has a fatality ratio of somewhere between 2 and 3%" CNN's Sanjay Gupta said at the Feb. 27 briefing.

"We think, we don't know exactly," Trump said "The flu is much higher than that."

12:15 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

Trump called coronavirus "deadly stuff" in early February, according to audio recording from Bob Woodward

CNN has obtained audio recordings from some of Bob Woodward's interviews with President Trump for his new book "Rage."

According to the book, Trump knew in early February coronavirus was dangerous, highly contagious, airborne and "deadly."

Here's an exchange between Woodward and Trump on Feb. 7:

Woodward: And so, what was President Xi saying yesterday?  

Trump: Oh, we were talking mostly about the virus. And I think he’s going to have it in good shape, but you know, it’s a very tricky situation. It’s –  

Woodward: Indeed.  

Trump: It goes through air, Bob. That’s always tougher than the touch. You know, the touch, you don’t have to touch things. Right? But the air, you just breathe the air and that’s how it’s passed. And so, that’s a very tricky one. That’s a very delicate one. It’s also more deadly than your – you know, your, even your strenuous flus. You know, people don’t realize, we lose 25,000, 30,000 people a year here. Who would ever think that, right?  

Woodward: I know. It’s much forgotten.  

Trump: Pretty amazing. And then I say, well, is that the same thing-  

Woodward: What are you able to do for-  

Trump: This is more deadly. This is five per- you know, this is five percent versus one percent and less than one percent. You know? So, this is deadly stuff.

12:27 p.m. ET, September 9, 2020

Covid-19 deaths in Florida surpass 12,000

From CNN's Melissa Alonso  

A funeral home director and mortician assistants prepare a funeral service for a man who died of Covid-19 on August 12 in Tampa, Florida.
A funeral home director and mortician assistants prepare a funeral service for a man who died of Covid-19 on August 12 in Tampa, Florida. Octavio Jones/Getty Images

Florida health officials reported 200 resident fatalities on Wednesday, bringing the resident death toll to 12,115, according to the Florida Department of Health.  

State health officials reported 154 non-Florida resident deaths as well, the department's data shows.

The health department reported 2,056 new cases of Covid-19, bringing the state’s total to 652,148.

There have been 40,517 Florida residents with Covid-19 hospitalized since the start of the pandemic, the department's data shows. 

One thing to note: These numbers were released by Florida’s public health agency, and may not line up exactly in real time with CNN’s database drawn from Johns Hopkins University and the Covid Tracking Project.