October 13 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Adam Renton, Emma Reynolds, Mike Hayes and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 12:00 a.m. ET, October 14, 2020
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12:36 p.m. ET, October 13, 2020

Delta warns investors: "It may be two years or more" for air travel to recover from the pandemic

From CNN’s Chris Isidore

Travelers wait for flights as Delta Air Lines planes sit at gates at the Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City, Utah, on September 15.
Travelers wait for flights as Delta Air Lines planes sit at gates at the Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City, Utah, on September 15. George Frey/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Delta Air Lines posted more massive losses in the third quarter, warning investors "it may be two years or more" for demand for air travel to return to normal.

The airline posted a $2.1 billion operating loss in the third quarter, excluding special items – like charges for buyout packages for employees who voluntarily left the company and early retirement of aircraft. Including those items, its net loss topped $5 billion for the second consecutive period.

The third-quarter loss was larger than forecast by Wall Street analysts, and Delta shares fell 3% in premarket trading on the news.

Analysts expect total losses among US airlines to top $10 billion for the last quarter, as the pandemic continues to fuel a huge drop in demand. Delta is the first US airline to report results for the quarter.

9:19 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

Argentina tops 900,000 Covid-19 cases as schools reopen in parts of the country

From CNN’s Tatiana Arias

Health workers transport a COVID-19 patient on a stretcher at a hospital in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on October 10.
Health workers transport a COVID-19 patient on a stretcher at a hospital in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on October 10. Natacha Pisarenko/AP

Schools are reopening in parts of Argentina, with measures in place to limit the spread of the pandemic, even as coronavirus cases in the country top 900,000.

The nation's largest province, Buenos Aires, is planning a return to school on Tuesday, with at least 24 of its districts resuming in-person classes, according to a statement published Monday on the country’s state-news agency, Telam.

"Classes will last 90 minutes without breaks and students will be divided into the necessary subgroups to respect social distancing according to the protocols," reads the statement. Students' temperatures will be taken at school entrances and they must certify that they "are in conditions to attend."

In the capital city itself -- considered medium risk for Covid-19 contagion -- "non-scholar, educational activities such as artistic, recreational [ones]" will go ahead "with a maximum of 10 people, including the teacher," according to Telam's statement.

The Governor of Buenos Aires province, Axel Kicillof, has announced a "significant reduction" in cases, but authorities have tightened restrictions in 18 other regions of the country for another two weeks, in an effort to curb the spread of the virus. 

Argentina’s health authorities reported 9,524 new coronavirus infections late Monday, bringing the country's Covid-19 case count to 903,730.

Additionally, 318 new virus-related deaths were reported, taking the country’s death toll to 24,186, according to the Ministry of Health.

8:06 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

"Something must be done this week," says Germany’s Bavarian state premier

From CNN's Nadine Schmidt in Berlin

Bavarian state premier Markus Söder speaks at a press conference following a cabinet meeting of the Bavarian State Government on October 13.
Bavarian state premier Markus Söder speaks at a press conference following a cabinet meeting of the Bavarian State Government on October 13. Peter Kneffel/picture alliance/Getty Images

Bavarian state premier Markus Söder is warning that Germany could "lose control of the coronavirus" pandemic, urging "something must be done this week," ahead of a key meeting between Chancellor Angela Merkel and the leaders of Germany's federal states. 

"Everywhere around us, there are extremely negative indications. That’s why it is important that Germany sets its course now. We have to act this week or risk that things get out of control," Söder said at a news conference on Tuesday.

He said European countries including Spain, France, the Czech Republic and the Netherlands were already struggling to contain the coronavirus pandemic.

Warning that "the autumnal coronavirus is no weaker or less dangerous than the coronavirus in March and April," he added "we don’t want a second national lockdown" but said "serious conversations" were needed to avoid that situation. 

On Tuesday, Germany reported its highest weekly infection numbers since April, with 24,584 cases.

Last week, Chancellor Merkel urged German citizens to stick to the country's coronavirus restrictions and warned that tougher restrictions may have to be imposed in the coming days. 

8:03 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

JPMorgan posts surprise profit gain as bank withstands economic turmoil of pandemic

From CNN’s Matt Egan

A person approaches the entrance to JPMorgan Chase & Co. headquarters in New York, on September 21.
A person approaches the entrance to JPMorgan Chase & Co. headquarters in New York, on September 21. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg/Getty Images

JPMorgan Chase unexpectedly grew its bottom line last quarter, as the bank's Wall Street business and its Main Street arm withstood turmoil in the global economy.

The US's largest bank blew away expectations by reporting a profit of $9.4 billion during the third quarter, up 4% from the year before. Per-share profit jumped to $2.92, easily topping estimates. 

JPMorgan's big beat was driven by strong trading and investment banking performance, as well as far fewer credit losses than feared. 

CEO Jamie Dimon said the bank decided in the third quarter to maintain its credit reserves at $34 billion, "given significant economic uncertainty and a broad range of potential outcomes."

JPMorgan's revenue dipped 11%, but that also was better than feared. 

The pandemic has slammed the banking industry: JPMorgan has lost about a quarter of its value so far this year and its $308 billion market valuation is now dwarfed by those of Tesla and Nvidia, but JPMorgan has weathered the storm better than some of its rivals. 

Citigroup's share price is down more than 40% on the year and the bank recently announced the surprise retirement of CEO Michael Corbat.

Wells Fargo has lost more than half of its value this year, and the money-losing bank recently cut its dividend for the first time since the Great Recession. 

10:21 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

Boris Johnson splits from scientific advisers he once placed front and center of pandemic response

Analysis from CNN's Luke McGee

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, looks on as Chief Medical Officer for England, Chris Whitty speaks during a virtual briefing outlining new Covid-19 rules, at Downing Street in London, on October 12.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, looks on as Chief Medical Officer for England, Chris Whitty speaks during a virtual briefing outlining new Covid-19 rules, at Downing Street in London, on October 12. Toby Melville/WPA Pool/Getty Images

There was a time when Boris Johnson claimed his government was following the science at every step of its plan for dealing with coronavirus. 

But as the number of confirmed Covid-19 cases in the UK soars once more, and the country braces for a long, miserable winter, the British Prime Minister appears to be at odds with those same advisers he once placed front and center of the pandemic response. 

His Chief Medical Officer on Monday night poured a bucket of cold water over his latest plans to tackle a worrying upturn in the spread of coronavirus in the UK.

And on Tuesday he faced further criticism, after it emerged that his top scientific advisers recommended a significantly tougher package of measures three weeks ago.

Johnson, it seems, is trapped by his bitterly divided Conservative Party -- faced down by the hawks, such as finance minister Rishi Sunak, who want to keep the economy as open as possible and doves, who think tough measures now would be better in the longer run.

His attempts to walk that tricky line were evident in a news conference on Monday evening.

Instead of introducing a short, sharp "circuit breaker" lockdown, advocated by experts who want to disrupt the current rate of transmission immediately and buy the country time before a difficult winter, Johnson outlined a three-tiered system of lockdown measures, to be applied locally according to the number of reported cases in a given area.

Even the top tier of these restrictions is a far cry from the hard UK lockdown in March. Children will still attend schools, restaurants will remain open and it will be up to local authorities to decide whether other parts of the hospitality sector close. 

It was clear that some of Johnson's senior scientific and medical advisers were not convinced.

Standing next to the Prime Minister was his Chief Medical Officer, Chris Whitty, who said he was "not confident" that even the restrictions envisaged for highest tier "would be enough to get on top" of the virus spread.

Read the full story here:

7:36 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

Rising Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations may be the start of another virus surge in US, officials warn

From CNN's Christina Maxouris

With 33 states reporting a rise in new Covid-19 cases and a nationwide uptick in hospitalizations, officials worry this could be the beginning of the fall surge experts have warned about. 

In Colorado, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock said Covid-19 cases were rising at a "concerning rate," and warned new restrictions could be needed, with the city's seven-day average daily case rates as "high right now as they were at the height of the pandemic back in May."

Officials across the country are warning of similar patterns.

White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx last week cautioned that the Northeast was seeing "early suggestions" of alarming trends.

Kentucky's governor said recently the state is seeing a third major escalation in infections.

And in Wisconsina field hospital is opening this week in response to a surge in Covid-19 patients -- days after the state reported record-high numbers of Covid-19 cases, hospitalizations and daily deaths. 

The US is now averaging more than 49,000 new infections daily -- up 14% from the previous week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Last week, the nation recorded more than 50,000 new cases for at least four days in a row. The last time that happened was in early August. 

I think we're facing a whole lot of trouble," Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNBC on Monday. "We've got to turn this around." 

That doesn't have to mean another lockdown, the infectious disease expert has previously said, but means more people heeding to safety guidelines like wearing masks and social distancing. 

Otherwise, the US could be in for a devastating winter. Researchers from the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project that more than 135,000 Americans could die within the next three months.

Read the full story here:

7:33 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

Iowa now has more than 100,000 coronavirus cases

From CNN’s Artemis Moshtaghian

Iowa reported 100,451 coronavirus cases across the state on Monday, hitting the 100,000 mark 218 days after the state reported its first cases in March, according to numbers released by the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH). 

To date, the state has reported 1,481 coronavirus related deaths, according to IDPH.

Iowa’s uptick in coronavirus cases stems from the outbreaks seen in the spring as clusters of Covid-19 cases popped up in nursing homes and at meatpacking plants, Dr. Ravi Vemuri, director of infection prevention at MercyOne Des Moines, told CNN affiliate KCCI.

US President Donald Trump is heading to Iowa on Wednesday for his first visit of the general election season, as several polls show him locked in a tight race with Joe Biden.

The same story is unfolding in Iowa as in many battlegrounds: Independents, women and seniors appear to be turning away from Trump, amid dissatisfaction over his handling of coronavirus and his broader conduct in office.

A total of 26 US states have now passed the 100,000 coronavirus case mark.

7:28 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

Cases on the rise in Austrian capital, months after outbreak at country's ski resorts

From CNN's Nadine Schmidt in Berlin

A health worker takes a sample for a Covid-19 test in Vienna, Austria, on September 23.
A health worker takes a sample for a Covid-19 test in Vienna, Austria, on September 23. Georg Hochmuth/APA/Getty Images

The Austrian capital, Vienna, has recorded 306 new infections within the past 24 hours.

Austria reported 1,028 new infections on Tuesday, bringing its total to 57,324, according to the country's public health authority, the Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES). 

Authorities there say 611 Covid-19 patients are being treated in hospital, 107 of whom are in intensive care units. Austria’s death toll stands at 861, the tally shows. 

Last week, Austria recorded 1,209 new cases in 24 hours -- its highest daily increase since the outbreak began, surpassing the record set in March when the initial wave of infections was at its peak. The country has seen a gradual rise in daily coronavirus infections since late June. 

In March this year, popular ski resorts in the western Austrian province of Tyrol were identified as one of the hotspots in spreading the coronavirus across Europe.

An Austrian expert commission on Monday criticized the country's Chancellor, Sebastian Kurz, for what they said was his government's poor handling of the crisis.

Crowds of people potentially infected with Covid-19 were allowed to leave the resorts of Ischgl and St. Anton in March -- helping to spread the virus across Europe -- before officials announced quarantine measures.  

Ronald Rohrer, head of the panel appointed by the province of Tyrol to look into Austria's handling of the outbreak, told reporters this was "a wrong decision, from an epidemiological perspective."

"The Austrian chancellor announced the imposition of the quarantines unexpectedly, without immediate authority, and without substantive preparations," Rohrer said.

Kurz announced a quarantine on March 13, but his government had not informed the local authorities which had to implement the measures, the commission found.

The Austrian Chancellor said foreign tourists would be allowed to leave, but according to the commission, this led to a panicked rush instead of an orderly departure.

In September, Kurz said that the country's upcoming ski season would go ahead, but that apres-ski parties will be banned to try and curb the spread of coronavirus.

8:17 a.m. ET, October 13, 2020

European countries agree to "traffic light" virus reporting and travel measures

From CNN's James Frater

Travelers queue to take coronavirus tests at Duesseldorf airport in Germany on October 13.
Travelers queue to take coronavirus tests at Duesseldorf airport in Germany on October 13. Roberto Pfeil/picture alliance/Getty Images

European Union countries have agreed to a set of criteria to make the reporting of coronavirus cases and travel restrictions easier to understand.

The EU hopes they will make travel more predictable, and help prevent further disruption caused by the pandemic. 

The recommendations adopted Tuesday include a new weekly "traffic light" map that will be published by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) showing countries' different epidemiological situations. 

The three categories for countries are:

  • Red: High risk -- quarantine on arrival/take a test (some countries may require a negative test in advance)
  • Orange: Medium risk -- quarantine on arrival/take a test (some countries may require a negative test in advance)
  • Green: Low risk -- no restrictions when traveling to another part of the EU.

The categories will be based on a clear set of comparable data from each country. 

The Covid-19 pandemic has disrupted our daily lives in many ways," Michael Roth, Germany’s Minister of State for Europe, said in a statement, adding that "travel restrictions have made it difficult for some of our citizens to get to work, to university or to visit their loved ones."

The new guidelines also set out how much notice should be given when travel restrictions are to be applied when a country moves from one category to another.

A member state intending to apply restrictions should inform the affected country and the European Commission at least 48 hours in advance. Members of the public and businesses should then be given clear, comprehensive and timely information at least 24 hours before new restrictions come into place. 

"It is our common duty to ensure coordination on any measures which affect free movement and to give our citizens all the information they need when deciding on their travel," said Roth.

The recommendations are not legally binding, and the decision whether to implement them remains up to each member state.

These European countries are seeing rises in Covid-19 cases: