November 4 coronavirus news

By Nectar Gan, Steve George, Zamira Rahim, Lauren Kent, Ed Upright, Rob Picheta and Hira Humayun, CNN

Updated 0601 GMT (1401 HKT) November 5, 2020
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4:30 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

Four regions in Italy will become coronavirus "red zones"

From CNN’s Livia Borghese

A waiter prepares to close a cafe in downtown Turin, on October 26, 2020, as the country faces a second wave of Covid-19 infections.
A waiter prepares to close a cafe in downtown Turin, on October 26, 2020, as the country faces a second wave of Covid-19 infections. Marco Bertorello/AFP/Getty Images

Four Italian regions will become coronavirus "red zones" on Friday, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announced on Wednesday.

The regions of Calabria, Lombardy, Piedmont and Valle d'Aosta will be placed under the country's harshest restrictive measures in its new "traffic light" system to tackle the spread of coronavirus.

The region of Puglia and the island of Sicily will become "orange zones," while the rest of the country becomes "yellow zones" (the lowest-risk zone).

"Yellow zones" are subject to new national measures that include a stay-at-home order from 10pm to 5am local time. In these zones, public transport can only operate at 50% capacity, museums and exhibition centers must close, and masks must be used in school by all students over the age of six. Restaurants and bars can remain open until 6pm, after which they can only provide take away or delivery services.

In "orange zones" people will also be banned from leaving their town and their region -- except for work or health reasons -- and bars and restaurants will only be able to do delivery and take-away service.

In the "red zones," Conte said people are not allowed to leave their houses except for work or health reasons. All the above national and orange rules apply, in addition to all non-essential shops being closed.

The new rules will go into effect on November 6 and will last until December 3.

“It’s not a discretionary decision,” Conte said referring to the color assigned to the regions. The three different levels of risk across the country are based on the virus transmission rate, the number of available intensive care beds and the testing capacity. They will be assessed every 14 days.

“If the risk lowers, less restrictive measures will be applied,” Conte said. “As we all wish,” he added.

There could be some exceptions inside the "red zones" for specific areas that are less affected by the pandemic.

“To freeze the surge of the contagion,” Conte said, “we have no alternatives; we must face these restrictions.”

“We understand the discomfort, the frustration, the psychological suffering, but we have to resist,” he added.

6:03 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

Eight NFL players test positive for Covid-19 in latest round of testing

The National Football League and NFL Players Association report eight players have tested positive for Covid-19 during the latest round of league-wide testing. The October 25 through October 31 testing window revealed 17 confirmed positive tests among personnel as well as the eight players, out of 7,884 individuals tested.

"Individuals who test positive for COVID-19 follow the joint NFL-NFLPA Treatment Protocol. They are immediately isolated, not permitted access club facilities, or have direct contact with players or personnel. Club medical staff are in regular communication with individuals who test positive to monitor symptoms," the NFL and NFLPA said in a press release.

Since testing began on August 1, 63 players and 99 other personnel have tested positive for the virus. 

4:19 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

France hits highest rate of ICU patients since April

From CNN's Pierre Bairin in Paris

A nurse tends to a patient in an intensive care unit set up for those infected with the novel coronavirus, Covid-19, at the Centre Hospitalier de l'Europe in Le Port-Marly, near Paris on November 4, 2020.
A nurse tends to a patient in an intensive care unit set up for those infected with the novel coronavirus, Covid-19, at the Centre Hospitalier de l'Europe in Le Port-Marly, near Paris on November 4, 2020. Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

There are now 4,080 Covid-19 patients being treated in intensive care in France -- a jump of 211 people on the previous day’s figures -- according to data from the country’s health authority.

The last time the number of patients in ICU for Covid-19 was this high was in late April.

In total, there are 27,511 Covid-19 patients in hospital -- a jump of 1,269.

The number of Covid-19 cases has increased by 40,455, according to the health authority.

5:44 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

Spain adds more than 1,000 Covid-19 deaths after re-examining data

From CNN’s Tim Lister

A healthcare worker wearing protective gear uses a mobile phone at the 12 de Octubre hospital in Madrid, amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, on October 28, 2020.
A healthcare worker wearing protective gear uses a mobile phone at the 12 de Octubre hospital in Madrid, amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, on October 28, 2020. Oscar Del Pozo/AFP/Getty Images

Spanish health authorities have adjusted the number of historic cases of the coronavirus, as well as deaths from the virus, after recalculating data from early in the pandemic.

The Health Ministry said that "5,105 cases and 1,326 deaths diagnosed before May 11 have been incorporated into the analysis," after establishing that data prior to May 11 was reported without adequate precision.

At the same time, 15,056 hospitalizations had been eliminated from the cumulative total.

The data released Wednesday show Spain has had a cumulative 1,284,408 cases of the coronavirus, with 248,653 new cases registered in the last two weeks.

After the statistical adjustment, the number of deaths now stands at 38,118 -- of which 888 have occurred in the last week.

3:16 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

Cambodian PM self-quarantines after meeting with Hungarian FM who tested positive for Covid-19

Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto, left, with Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen in Phnom Penh, Cambodia,  Szijjarto tested positive for the coronavirus after arriving in Thailand for an official visit, Thai and Hungarian officials said Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020.
Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto, left, with Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Szijjarto tested positive for the coronavirus after arriving in Thailand for an official visit, Thai and Hungarian officials said Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020. Pool/AP

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen announced Wednesday that he is self-quarantined despite testing negative for Covid-19, after meeting with Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto, who tested positive for Covid-19 on Tuesday, according to state news agency Agence Kampuchea Press (AKP).

Szijjarto visited Cambodia on Tuesday and met with several government officials, including the country's prime minister. He then tested positive with coronavirus upon his arrival to Thailand's capital, Bangkok, after he left Cambodia, the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade told CNN on Wednesday. 

In a Facebook post, the Prime Minister said doctors tested those who had contact with the Hungarian delegation visiting Cambodia on Tuesday after receiving the news about the Hungarian Foreign Minister testing positive for the virus in Thailand after leaving Cambodia, AKP reported.

"The test result of me and my wife, the bodyguards, the drivers -- 18 persons in total -- shows that no one was infected with COVID-19," state news quoted the Prime Minister. "Anyway, for the safety of all, the doctors required me to be in quarantine for 14 days, and not to meet anyone, even my wife, my children and my grandchildren."

The Prime Minister also announced the postponement of upcoming events like "welcoming the return of Their Majesties the King and Queen-Mother from medical checkup in China," AKP reported.

He said that despite the 14-day quarantine, he will still perform his duties as usual from his residence, AKP said in its report.

Szijjarto has also cancelled all events in Thailand and is on his way back home in a private jet after "brief visit" to the country on Tuesday and Wednesday, the National News Bureau of Thailand said in a Facebook post on Wednesday.

2:08 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

New record increase in Covid-19 cases in Greece, as government considers fresh lockdown

From CNN’s Chris Liakos

A man walks along a quiet street on the island of Astypalea, Greece on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020. 
A man walks along a quiet street on the island of Astypalea, Greece on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020.  Petros Giannakouris/AP

Greece has registered 2,646 new Covid-19 cases, according to the country’s National Public Health Organization, setting a new daily record.

The new infections take the total number of cases since the start of the pandemic to 46,892.

There have been a further 18 deaths, taking the total to 673.

The Greek Prime Minister is expected to announce further restrictions on Thursday to curb the spread of coronavirus. Greece, alongside other European countries, has tightened restrictions in recent weeks to combat the spike in coronavirus cases across the region.

Greek media suggest that a national lockdown is being considered. Greek government spokesman Stelios Petsas said earlier this week that a national lockdown cannot be ruled out judging from how the situation is developing in all European countries.

2:51 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

UK records another significant jump in Covid-19 cases

From CNN's Simon Cullen in London

People queue to enter a store in Liverpool, northwest England on November 4, 2020.
People queue to enter a store in Liverpool, northwest England on November 4, 2020. Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images

The UK has recorded another 25,177 coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, another significant load of infections announced hours before England goes into a second lockdown.

There have been a further 492 deaths.

A total of 1,099,059 positive cases have now been recorded in the UK since the pandemic began. According to government data, Wednesday's update marked the second biggest daily increase the UK has recorded.

The number of patients being treated in hospital for Covid-19 also continues to rise, standing at 12,320.

1:09 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

Denver Broncos and San Francisco 49ers cancel practices after players test positive

Denver Broncos helmets hang on the bench before a game with the New England Patriots on October 18 at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts.
Denver Broncos helmets hang on the bench before a game with the New England Patriots on October 18 at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts. Fred Kfoury III/Icon Sportswire/Getty Images

The Denver Broncos have canceled Wednesday’s planned practice due to Covid-19 concerns, after a player on the practice squad was added to the Covid-19 list.

On Tuesday, the team announced that John Elway, the team's president of football operations and general manager, and its president and CEO Joe Ellis had both tested positive for coronavirus. 

"With the recent increase in positive cases and a practice squad player added to the COVID-19 reserve list today, this was the safe and responsible thing to do," the NFL team said in a statement.

The Broncos plan to resume in-person practice on Thursday and are scheduled to travel to Atlanta to play the Falcons on Sunday.

Elsewhere in the league, the San Francisco 49ers were forced to shut their facility just a day before they are set to play the Green Bay Packers after a player tested positive for the virus.

12:58 p.m. ET, November 4, 2020

Denmark to cull its entire mink population over coronavirus mutation fears

A mink is photographed in a farm in Hjoerring, in North Jutland, Denmark, on October 8, 2020.
A mink is photographed in a farm in Hjoerring, in North Jutland, Denmark, on October 8, 2020. Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP/Getty Images

All mink in Denmark are to be culled, because of concerns that the animals are spreading a mutated form of coronavirus, the country’s Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen says.

Frederiksen revealed that the Statens Serum Institut found five examples in mink farms and 12 examples in humans that showed reduced sensitivity to antibodies.

"The virus has mutated in mink. The mutated virus has spread to humans," Frederiksen said. "In other words: The mutated virus -- via mink -- can carry the risk that the upcoming vaccine will not work as it should,"

"It is necessary to kill all mink in Denmark. This also applies to breeding animals," she said.

"It is… a decision the government is making with a heavy heart," the Prime Minister said. "But, given the clear recommendation of the health authorities, it is the necessary decision."

Frederiksen added that new restrictions will need to be introduced in certain areas to contain the spread of the mutated virus.

“Unfortunately, the residents of those municipalities have to prepare for further restrictions in the near future,” she said.

The decision was hailed by animal rights groups, who have long opposed the use of mink for fur.

"Although not a ban on fur farming, this move signals the end of suffering for millions of animals confined to small wire cages on Danish fur farms solely for the purposes of a trivial fur fashion that no-one needs," Joanna Swabe, the international senior director of public affairs for the Humane Society, said in a statement.

"We commend the Danish Prime Minister on her decision to take such an essential and science-led step to protect Danish citizens from the deadly coronavirus."