April 16 coronavirus news

By Julia Hollingsworth, Adam Renton, Rob Picheta and Fernando Alfonso III, CNN

Updated 1722 GMT (0122 HKT) December 27, 2020
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8:35 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

Top White House adviser on coronavirus says states have to match need to capacity in large-scale testing

Dr. Deborah Birx.
Dr. Deborah Birx. Source: CNN

Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said during CNN's global coronavirus town hall that it's important for states to match need with capacity as they ramp up widespread testing -- an important lesson learned during the HIV/AIDS crisis.

"That's part of what states are working through right now, is to really identify where all of that equipment is, where the point-of-care tests are and how we need to work together to really create that alignment," she said.
"I know it seems daunting at times, but I've done this all over the world in resource-limited settings, and we've been able to really align need with capacity so that you can really respond to what the communities need."
8:12 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

Trump suggests world leaders were not adequately warned about coronavirus

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez 

US President Donald Trump seemed to suggest during today's press briefing that world leaders were not adequately warned about the severity of the coronavirus, saying he was “angry” because he and fellow G7 leaders were out of the loop. 

Speaking about a meeting earlier Thursday with other G7 leaders, Trump said, “all of them and their countries have been devastated by this. Their economies have been devastated by this.”

“And I was angry, because it should have been told to us. It should have been told to us early. It should have been told to us a lot sooner. People knew it was happening and people didn’t want to talk about it. I don’t know why, but we’re going to get to the bottom of it,” Trump continued. 

Without mentioning China by name, where the first cases of the coronavirus were reported, Trump added, “I’m not saying anything. I’m saying people should have told us about this. They should have told the rest of the world, too.” 

7:54 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

SOON: CNN hosts a coronavirus town hall

CNN’s Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta will host a two-hour global town hall on coronavirus tonight. It starts at 8 p.m. ET.

The town hall will feature former Vice President Joe Biden, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator.

Zuckerberg will be joined by his wife, Dr. Priscilla Chan, to discuss the pandemic.

You can watch the town hall on the video player above, on air, on CNN.com and all digital platforms, and streaming devices on CNNgo.

7:43 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

Boeing will restart commercial plane factory operations in Puget Sound next week

From CNN’s Gregory Wallace

Several Boeing 777X aircrafts are seen in production during a media tour of the Boeing production facility in Everett, Washington, on February 27, 2019.
Several Boeing 777X aircrafts are seen in production during a media tour of the Boeing production facility in Everett, Washington, on February 27, 2019. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Boeing says it will restart its assembly plants making commercial airplanes in Washington state next week. 

The company closed the facilities in late March and arranged cleanings after it said “around 100” contracted the coronavirus. 

“Colleagues returning to work will see a wide range of safety measures in place, including operating practices to enable physical distancing such as staggered shift times, spread-out work areas and visual controls, voluntary body temperature screenings, and of course constant visible reminders to wash hands and monitor our personal well-being,” CEO Dave Calhoun wrote in a message to employees. 

Boeing restarted some Pacific Northwest production on military aircraft earlier this week.

7:44 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

New Mexico governor on White House recovery plan: "We appreciate their suggestions"

From CNN's Andy Rose

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham puts on her face mask when not speaking during an update on the coronavirus outbreak during a news conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on Wednesday, April 15.
New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham puts on her face mask when not speaking during an update on the coronavirus outbreak during a news conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on Wednesday, April 15. Eddie Moore/The Albuquerque Journal via AP

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said she will evaluate the Trump administration’s “Opening Up America Again” guidelines, but made it clear she is not ready to lift restrictions anytime soon. 

“We appreciate their suggestions, and we will evaluate them thoroughly,” said the Democratic governor, “but the plain overriding fact is we cannot put the cart before the horse.”

Grisham noted in a statement that Thursday had the highest daily number of coronavirus deaths New Mexico has recorded during the epidemic. 

“The sad reality is we will see more; that’s the awful nature of this virus and that’s why we absolutely must keep up our vigorous social distancing efforts, difficult as it is to sacrifice our sense of normalcy. We are flattening the curve – but we can’t stop now," she said.

7:34 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

More than 660,000 coronavirus cases have been reported in the US

There are at least 658,263 cases of coronavirus in the US and at least 32,186 people have died from the disease, according to Johns Hopkins University's tally of cases.

On Thursday, Johns Hopkins reported 29,114 new cases and 2,024 reported deaths. 

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other US territories, as well as all repatriated cases.

7:19 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

FDA approves new swabs that would allow for safer at-home coronavirus testing

From CNN's Maggie Fox

People might soon be able to perform their own test swabs for Covid-19 at home with a newly designed, Q-tip-style swab, the US Food and Drug Administration said today.

The FDA said it had worked with US Cotton to design the swabs, which are shorter than the swabs used by technicians, doctors or nurses to collect samples to test people for Covid-19 infection.

The swabs currently used are long and must be directed deep into the nose – a process that is uncomfortable and can make people sneeze potentially infectious particles.

The new swab is shorter and can collect a sample from the front of the nose, the FDA said.

“The type of testing at the front of the nose used in this study is notable because it allows self-collection by patients thereby limiting exposure of healthcare providers; it is more comfortable for patients and it can be performed by a swab that is more readily available and manufacturable at scale,” the FDA said in a statement.

The FDA also said US Cotton plans to manufacture large quantities of these swabs.

Commercially available cosmetic Q-tips are not suitable for use in testing because their cotton fibers absorb too much snot.

7:20 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

Birx says vulnerable populations must be monitored as states prepare to reopen

From CNN's Maegan Vazquez 

Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, on Thursday, April 16, in Washington.
Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, on Thursday, April 16, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP

Dr. Deborah Birx underscored that vulnerable populations need to continue to be monitored for potential coronavirus outbreaks as states prepare to reopen their economy.

“We want every state to have a plan for the health and safety of its workers in critical industries and protect the health and safety of those living in high-risk facilities,” she said.

Birx said the federal government will be conducting “sentinel surveillance throughout nursing homes, throughout inner-city federal clinics, throughout indigenous populations to really be able to find early alerts of asymptomatic individuals in the community and both for the syndromic cases.”

CNN previously reported on the new guidelines for “opening up America again,” which offer federal guidance advising when states should allow people back into the community and workplaces.

“We did not put a timeline on any of the phases. We want the governors, with the data that they have, community by community, to be setting up those timelines,” Birx said.

There are three phases to the “opening up America again” plan, and Birx called phase three “returning to our new normal.”

7:19 p.m. ET, April 16, 2020

Trump: Some states could open "literally tomorrow"

From CNN's Sarah Westwood

President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House on Thursday, April 16, in Washington.
President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House on Thursday, April 16, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump said certain states that are not battling a coronavirus outbreak could open for business as soon as Friday if they meet the criteria laid out by the White House today.

“If you look at Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota – that’s a lot different than New York, it’s a lot different than New Jersey,” Trump said at the coronavirus task force briefing.

The President said the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention social distancing guidelines should remain in place unless a governor determines it has gone 14 days with a low-enough number of cases to satisfy the new reopening guidelines.

“They’ll be in place, dependent on what the governor wants to do,” he said.

Trump said states could open tomorrow if they retroactively determine they’ve hit the two-week mark, allowing them to move onto the next “phase” of the new guidelines.

“They will be able to go literally tomorrow because they’ve met all of the guidelines,” he said.

Trump noted that if a governor acted too quickly to open its businesses and allow mass gatherings, the administration would be “expressing ourselves very strongly.”

“We have large sections of the country right now that can start thinking about opening,” he said.

The President noted that he asked officials today in meetings why the recommendations included that people wear masks in public, even in an area that has not seen many Covid-19 cases, when things return to a version of normal. He said he was told that is to protect locals “if someone should come in from an area that isn’t so successful” in mitigating the spread of the virus.

Trump said 29 states are “in that ballgame” of being able to consider reopening in the days ahead.