January 5 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Adam Renton, Kara Fox, Ed Upright and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 12:02 a.m. ET, January 6, 2021
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3:07 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

California surpasses 27,000 Covid-19 deaths

From CNN's Cheri Mossburg

Funeral director Steven Correa moves the casket of Gilberto Arreguin Camacho, 58, in preparation for burial following his death due to Covid-19 at the Continental Funeral Home on December 31, in Los Angeles, California. 
Funeral director Steven Correa moves the casket of Gilberto Arreguin Camacho, 58, in preparation for burial following his death due to Covid-19 at the Continental Funeral Home on December 31, in Los Angeles, California.  Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

California reported 368 new Covid-19 fatalities Tuesday, bringing the state's total death toll to over 27,000 since the start of the pandemic.

Additionally, 31,440 new cases of the coronavirus bring the state’s total number of infections to 2.45 million.

California has averaged more than 38,000 new cases every day for the past two weeks. 

Once again, hospitalizations are reaching all-time highs in the Golden State. More than 22,000 people are receiving in-patient treatment, the state reported Tuesday. About 21% of those patients are in intensive care units. Much of the state is still feeling the oppressive crush, with ICU capacity at 0% in Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley.

Nearly 300,000 Covid-19 tests are conducted every day in California, and the positivity rate continues to rise, reaching 12.7%, the highest rate since the initial wave of infections last spring.

With a total of 27,003 deaths, California has the third highest Covid-19 death toll in the nation. Only New York and Texas have reported a higher number of fatalities.

NOTE: These numbers were released by the California Department of Public Health and may not line up exactly in real time with CNN’s database drawn from Johns Hopkins University and the Covid Tracking Project. 

2:31 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

Denmark will impose tougher coronavirus restrictions as fears over spread of UK variant rise

From CNN’s Antonia Mortensen

A view of an empty Bruuns Galleri in Aarhus, Denmark, on December 17, 2020.
A view of an empty Bruuns Galleri in Aarhus, Denmark, on December 17, 2020. Mikkel Berg Pedersen/Ritzau Scanpix/AP

Denmark will introduce new, tougher measures aimed at curbing the spread of coronavirus, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said Tuesday.

She warned the "situation is really serious" as the country sees further confirmed cases of a more transmissible new variant first identified in the UK.

"A new and disturbing development in the pandemic has hit us: The British mutation in the coronavirus, which is a particularly contagious version," Frederiksen said during a news conference in Copenhagen.  

Frederiksen expressed fears that the new variant might spread more quickly across Denmark than previously circulating strains, even as scientists work to track the spread and determine if it’s really driving new infection rates.

"Stay home, work at home if at all possible, cancel social engagements…if we do not succeed in delaying this mutation, more people will get sick, more people will be hospitalized and die, and it will put massive pressure on our hospitals," she urged citizens. 

Under the new restrictions — which are expected to come into force on Wednesday — authorities have recommended all social gatherings be limited to a maximum of five people outside of one’s household, with a distance of two meters, rather than one, to be kept at all times in public spaces. 

The government has also appealed to citizens to cancel all non-essential appointments until Jan. 17, and has encouraged citizens to avoid meeting with people outside of their own household as much as possible. 

While no final decision has been taken on enforcing further travel restrictions, the Prime Minister also confirmed that the government is considering additional measures to control travel to and from Denmark. 

"The next weeks will be crucial…we must see infection rates drop and we must be as low in case numbers as possible once the new variant takes over," Health Minister Magnus Heunicke said during the news conference. 
"If we can drop infection rates, it will be harder for the British version to take hold. It is a race between that mutation and the vaccines – and it is a race we must win," he added.

According to Denmark’s Statens Serum Institut (SSI), the new variant is believed to be at least 50 percent more contagious than existing coronavirus variants in Denmark. 

SSI Director Henrik Ullum also said it is possible the new variant could spread rapidly across Denmark by mid-February, leading to an exponential increase in infection numbers. 

While Prime Minister Frederiksen noted the country’s vaccination program will help to "bring the infection down," she cautioned that Denmark is "in a real race with time."

"Our strategy is clear: the minute they hit the ground, the vaccinations must be given," Frederiksen said. "The next few months will be the most difficult in the epidemic. Then spring will help us, and more and more people are being vaccinated," she added.
2:23 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

National survey finds nearly 3% of community in London test positive for new Covid-19 variant

From CNN's Niamh Kennedy

General view of an empty and deserted Oxford street in London, England, on January 5, 2021.
General view of an empty and deserted Oxford street in London, England, on January 5, 2021. Vuk Valcic/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

Nearly 3% of the community in London tested positive for the new coronavirus variant in the closing days of 2020 and the first two days of 2021, the UK Office for National Statistics announced Tuesday.

Its Covid-19 Infection Survey said that 2.72% of the community in London tested positive for the new variant on Jan. 2. By contrast, 0.69% of the community in London tested positive for other variants on Jan. 2, the survey added.

The findings are based on the Community Infection Survey produced by the ONS, and are broken down by region as well as England-wide. 

The new variant is more prevalent than other variants in London, the east of England and the southeast of England, the data shows. It is about equally prevalent with other variants in the east and west Midlands and the southwest. 

Speaking during the UK government daily coronavirus news conference on Tuesday, England’s Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty said in England "in every area there has been a relative increase in the new variant of this virus that is spreading around the country." 

Whitty said the fastest increases have been seen in southeast England and eastern England in addition to London. 

About 1.70% of the community in the east tested positive for the new variant on Jan. 2, while 0.46% of the community there tested positive on the same day for other variants. 

In southeast England, 1.35% of the community tested positive on Jan. 2 for the new variant, with 0.78% testing positive for other variants.

Whitty warned that the new variant is "now taking off in other areas as well," including in parts of the country "which have got some of the lower rates and had previously controlled things." Whitty drew particular attention to the northeast and northwest "where the rate of increase has been higher than in some of the southern areas.”

2:19 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

Germany extends national lockdown and tightens restrictions

From CNN’s Nadine Schmidt and Claudia Otto

A shopper walks in a nearly empty street in Cologne, Germany on January 5, 2021.
A shopper walks in a nearly empty street in Cologne, Germany on January 5, 2021. Ying Tang/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Germany's government announced it will extend the country's national lockdown – which was in place until Jan. 10 – until the end of the month. It will also further tighten restrictions on movement and contact in order to curb the spread of coronavirus. 

"We will have to harden measures," Chancellor Angela Merkel told journalists following a meeting with Germany's 16 regional leaders in Berlin. She warned that hospitals across the country are already overwhelmed, particularly in intensive care units. 

Under the new measures, all non-essential stores, restaurants, schools and nurseries will be required to remain shut until Jan. 31. Citizens will only be permitted to meet with one other person outside of their own household, as opposed to gatherings of up to five people from two separate households. 

"We need to restrict contact more strictly…we ask all citizens to restrict contact to the absolute minimum," Merkel added. 

Tougher measures will also be introduced in towns and districts where the number of new coronavirus cases exceeds 200 per 100,000 residents over seven days, with a limit on non-essential travel of up to 15km (9.3 miles), Merkel announced. 

She also confirmed that travelers returning to Germany from high-risk countries will now have to test twice for coronavirus, with travelers required to quarantine for five days upon return, even if their first coronavirus test result is negative. 

Addressing the spread of the more transmissible variant first identified in the UK, Merkel said it is a "race against time" for Germany.

Bavarian state premier Markus Soeder also warned that "the mutating virus is spreading faster and likely to become more prevalent," adding that the lockdown would have to be extended as a result of this "new threat."

Chancellor Merkel reiterated that the coronavirus vaccine gives "hope to return to normal life," asserting that – despite criticism — Germany was right to back the European Commission’s decision to procure vaccines for all 27 member states. 

"We do not want any go-it-alone national approach in securing vaccines," Merkel said.

According to Germany’s Robert Koch Institute (RKI) on Tuesday, 316,962 people in Germany have now been vaccinated – around 0.4% of the country's population.

A total of 11,897 new cases new cases of coronavirus and 944 additional deaths were recorded in Germany as of Tuesday, the RKI added. 

1:46 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

Fauci says "it is very unlikely" Covid-19 vaccines will be federally mandated

From CNN's Jacqueline Howard

A healthcare worker with the Florida Department of Health in Broward prepares to administer a COVID-19 vaccine at a drive-thru vaccination site in Davie, Florida, on Tuesday, January 4.
A healthcare worker with the Florida Department of Health in Broward prepares to administer a COVID-19 vaccine at a drive-thru vaccination site in Davie, Florida, on Tuesday, January 4. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday that "it is very unlikely" the US federal government would ever try to legally require people to receive Covid-19 vaccines.

"It is very unlikely it will be federally mandated," Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Newsday's Randi Marshall during a virtual event. 

Mandating vaccines is left to state and local authorities in the US.

"There will be individual institutions — they can be hospitals, they can be workplaces, they can be schools — where the authorities in charge of that institution say that in order to participate in the activities of this institution, you have to get vaccinated," Fauci said, adding that hospitals and other health care facilities, for instance, have a long history of requiring workers to get vaccinated against various pathogens.

US public school districts, as well as many camps and daycares, require students to be vaccinated in order to attend.

1:21 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

New York governor says UK strain of Covid-19 "is a very real problem"

From CNN's Laura Dolan

New York City residents wait in a line outside a COVID-19 testing site through NYC Health + Hospitals located in Queens, on Sunday, January 3.
New York City residents wait in a line outside a COVID-19 testing site through NYC Health + Hospitals located in Queens, on Sunday, January 3. Ron Adar/SOPA Images/Sipa/AP Images

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says the UK strain of Covid-19 is highly problematic and could be a game changer. He made the comments during a press conference Tuesday.

The governor said he spoke with global experts about the strain and said the numbers are frightening on the increase of the transmission of the virus.

"Apparently the UK strain can actually overtake the original Covid strain in a matter of weeks," Cuomo said. "Even if the lethality doesn’t go up, the fact that it is so much more transmittable is a very real problem," he added.

Cuomo urged anyone who may have been exposed to the state's first confirmed case of the UK strain – in Saratoga – to contact the state and come forward. "Containment is vitally important here," he said.

He compared fighting the virus to a footrace and said the UK strain changes the whole race.

"We are in a footrace right now, as I said, between the vaccine implementation versus the infection rate and hospitalization capacity."

1:13 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

One in 50 people in England has coronavirus, England's chief medical officer says

From CNN's Richard Greene

Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty leaves 10 Downing Street, in London, England, on January 4.
Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty leaves 10 Downing Street, in London, England, on January 4. Aaron Chown/PA Images/Getty Images

About one in 50 people across England now has coronavirus, England’s chief medical officer Chris Whitty said Tuesday, calling the figure "really very high."

The Covid-19 case rate across the United Kingdom increased by 70% in the two weeks to Dec. 30, Whitty said. 

Government data showed the rate rose from 287 cases per 100,000 people on Dec. 16 to 487 per 100,000 people on Dec. 30. The comparison is of the seven-day rolling average.

The number of people currently hospitalized with Covid-19 across the UK is as high as it has ever been, Whitty added. 

The number is daily deaths is currently below the peak in April 2020, but Whitty said that pattern might not hold given the number of people sick with coronavirus at the moment.

“We will unfortunately see, inevitably, a spike in the number of people who die of this disease,” Whitty said.

On Monday UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a new national lockdown in England to tackle this surge. Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced Monday that mainland Scotland would enter into a lockdown from midnight whilst the remaining UK nations Wales and Northern Ireland started lockdowns in December.

1:10 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

No scientific basis for giving just one dose of current coronavirus vaccines, Fauci says

From CNN Health's Jacqueline Howard

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during at the NIH Clinical Center Masur Auditorium in Bethesda, Maryland, on Tuesday, December 22, 2020.
Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during at the NIH Clinical Center Masur Auditorium in Bethesda, Maryland, on Tuesday, December 22, 2020. Patrick Semansky/Associated Press/Bloomberg/Getty Images

There is no scientific data to support giving just a single dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna Covid-19 vaccines, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on Tuesday.

The vaccines were authorized to be given as two doses and the US Food and Drug Administration on Monday nixed any idea of changing that regimen to stretch supply.

"There really is no scientific basis in a clinical trial that proves that giving a dose to more people and maybe waiting instead of the 21 or 28 days that the science told us is the correct interval to going out three, maybe four months to the second dose," Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Newsday's Randi Marshall during a virtual event.

"That is something that is taking a chance and we prefer to make all of our decisions based on the scientific data that we have," Fauci said. "There is not scientific data to back that up. It might work. ... But we don't have good scientific data to prove that."

12:26 p.m. ET, January 5, 2021

World Bank predicts 4% growth for global economy in 2021 — as long as vaccines are widely available

From CNN's Pamela Boykoff

The World Bank headquarters located in Washington DC, on October 1, 2020.
The World Bank headquarters located in Washington DC, on October 1, 2020. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

The World Bank expects the global economy will grow by 4% in 2021, after contracting 4.3% last year, assuming widespread deployment of Covid-19 vaccines.

In its Global Economic Prospects, the World Bank warned the pandemic may depress both incomes and economic activity for a prolonged period of time. The outlook is “highly uncertain,” and delays in rolling out vaccines could substantially hamper growth.

“While the global economy appears to have entered a subdued recovery, policymakers face formidable challenges—in public health, debt management, budget policies, central banking and structural reforms—as they try to ensure that this still fragile global recovery gains traction and sets a foundation for robust growth,” World Bank Group President David Malpass said in a statement.