January 10 coronavirus news

By Helen Regan, Jenni Marsh and Amy Woodyatt, CNN

Updated 12:00 a.m. ET, January 11, 2021
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2:03 a.m. ET, January 10, 2021

US reports more than 269,000 Covid-19 cases

From CNN's Alta Spells

The United States reported 269,623 new Covid-19 cases and 3,655 virus-related deaths on Saturday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The latest figures bring the nationwide total to 22,132,396 and at least 372,428 people have died in the US.

At least 22,137,350 vaccine doses have been distributed and 6,688,231 doses of the vaccine have been administered, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The totals include cases from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and other U.S. territories, as well as repatriated cases. 

Follow the US cases here:

 

1:08 a.m. ET, January 10, 2021

Canadians call out leaders for breaking their own Covid-19 rules

From CNN's Lindsay Isaac and Paula Newton

Rod Phillips, Minister of Finance, answers questions at a daily press conference in Toronto, on June 5, 2020.
Rod Phillips, Minister of Finance, answers questions at a daily press conference in Toronto, on June 5, 2020. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Canadians who have endured a travel ban, 14-day quarantines and weeks-long lockdowns are angry with politicians and government workers who are flouting the very health guidelines they helped put in place. 

After telling Canadians to hunker down and cancel holiday plans, more than a dozen high-profile politicians, public health leaders and even a hospital CEO have been caught taking vacations.

What followed were confessions, demotions, resignations and a ferocious, if uncharacteristic outcry from Canadians.

In Alberta, where the Covid-19 case numbers are among the highest in the country, eight politicians have admitted to traveling abroad.

Many Canadians have also been outraged by what seems like a deliberate plan by some to hide their vacation plans. 

Ontario's finance minister, Rod Phillips, lost his job after a video message posted on Christmas Eve thanking his constituents for obeying lockdown turned out to be pre-recorded.

"For politicians who have been preaching to us to restrict our activities, to restrict our social gatherings, to see our elderly loved ones through iPad and glass windows, for them to then ignore the sacrifice of others for their personal pleasure, (it) is hard to articulate how deeply disturbing that is," said Dr. Alan Drummond in an interview with CNN from his medical office in Perth, Ontario. "It truly feels like an insult."

Read the full story:

12:28 a.m. ET, January 10, 2021

China keeps promising its African allies that coronavirus vaccines for the continent are a priority. But where are they?

Analysis from CNN's Jenni Marsh

Chinese State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi is seen in a recent interview with Xinhua News Agency and China Media Group in Beijing, on December 31, 2020.
Chinese State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi is seen in a recent interview with Xinhua News Agency and China Media Group in Beijing, on December 31, 2020. Xinhua/Sipa USA

China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi concludes his tour of Africa this weekend without making a single concrete vaccine commitment to a continent hoping a benevolent Beijing will help inoculate its population out of the global coronavirus pandemic.

Last year, as Covid-19 tore across the globe and wealthy countries began to pre-order stockpiles of vaccines for their citizens, Chinese President Xi Jinping pledged that African vaccinations were a "priority" for Beijing.

His commitment followed mass donations of masks, testing kits and medical equipment to the continent by Beijing and private individuals, such as billionaire entrepreneur Jack Ma.

Now, with negative sentiment towards China hardening in Western democracies due to trade wars and human rights issues, African allies -- which have crucial voting rights at major international bodies -- have arguably become an even more vital bloc for China to keep on side with its so-called vaccine diplomacy.

While a cold chain vaccine air bridge from Shenzhen, in southern China, to Addis Ababa, in Ethiopia, has been established, and manufacturing capabilities are being set up to make Chinese shots in Cairo, Wang's trip made it no clearer when Africans can expect to receive a Chinese vaccine -- or on what terms.

Read the full analysis:

11:17 p.m. ET, January 9, 2021

Biden’s plan to release all Covid-19 vaccine doses could be risky, but context is important, says former FDA official

From CNN Health’s Lauren Mascarenhas

A registered nurse holds a vile of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine before administering it to healthcare employees in Anaheim, California, on January 8.
A registered nurse holds a vile of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine before administering it to healthcare employees in Anaheim, California, on January 8. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden’s plan to release all available Covid-19 vaccine doses immediately could be risky, but it’s important to take it in context, former US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official Dr. Norman Baylor said Saturday in an exclusive interview with CNN's Michael Smerconish.

Both Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines require two doses, 21 and 28 days apart, respectively. Second doses are currently on hold by the federal government and released according to the vaccine schedule for people to complete their two-dose regimen. 

“Giving the one dose and delaying the second dose beyond what was discovered in the clinical trials, we take a risk of those individuals not necessarily being protected sufficiently,” said Baylor, former director of the FDA’s Office of Vaccines Research and Review (OVRR).

He noted that the only efficacy data available on these vaccines is from the clinical trials, which followed the outlined dosing regimen. However, the context around Biden’s plan is important, Baylor added.

“You have to have an idea of when is that second dose coming. Is that second dose coming 21, 28 days after you give that first dose?” he said. “Maybe it'll come in five weeks – and there's a little room for plus and minus with days – but you have to contextualize the whole plan before you can just dismiss it completely.”

11:17 p.m. ET, January 9, 2021

United States reports over 130,000 Covid-19 hospitalizations

From CNN's Hollie Silverman

The United States reported 130,777 current Covid-19 hospitalizations on Saturday, according to the Covid Tracking Project (CTP).

It is the fifth highest number of hospitalizations reported in the country and the 39th consecutive day that the US has remained above 100,000 current hospitalizations.

The highest hospitalization numbers according to CTP data are:

  1. January 6, 2021: 132,464
  2. January 7, 2021: 132,370
  3. January 8, 2021: 131,889
  4. January 5, 2021: 131,215
  5. January 9, 2021: 130,777

 

The weekly tallies of Covid-19 cases and deaths in the US have never been higher, and state officials are warning of more alarming patterns following the holiday season.

More than two million new Covid-19 cases and 24,000 deaths were reported in the first nine days of 2021 in the US, according to the Johns Hopkins University Covid tracker. 

11:17 p.m. ET, January 9, 2021

Biden coronavirus adviser "not recommending that the second dose be delayed”

From CNN Health’s Lauren Mascarenhas

Douglas Magee, 78, a retired Army officer and resident of the Mississippi State Veterans Home in Jackson, right, is inoculated by Brent Myers, a CVS pharmacist, in Jackson, Mississippi, on January 9.
Douglas Magee, 78, a retired Army officer and resident of the Mississippi State Veterans Home in Jackson, right, is inoculated by Brent Myers, a CVS pharmacist, in Jackson, Mississippi, on January 9. Rogelio V. Solis/AP

President-elect Joe Biden’s team is confident that if they release all available doses of Covid-19 vaccine immediately, people will be able to complete the two-dose regimen as planned, Dr. Celine Gounder, a member of Biden’s coronavirus advisory board says.

“I want to be very clear that we are not recommending that the second dose be delayed, so people should still get their second dose of the Pfizer vaccine at 21 days, of the Moderna vaccine at 28 days,” Gounder told CNN’s Ana Cabrera on Saturday.

So long as there are not any manufacturing glitches, we're confident that the supply of vaccine will be there when people return for their second dose,” she added.

Gounder said that having a second dose ready for each person who receives their first dose could lead to vaccines sitting on the shelves, and the new plan aims to simplify distribution.

In a sense, we've been getting in our own way, making things overly complicated,” she said.

“What we're really trying to do is just get doses out as quickly as possible, simplify the tracking that's necessary here, and we have faith that the supply will meet the need in this case,” Gounder added.

10:59 p.m. ET, January 9, 2021

Israel's PM Netanyahu receives second dose of Covid vaccine

From CNN's Andrew Carey and Amir Tal in Jerusalem

Israeli Prime Minister Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is ready to receive the second Covid-19 vaccine at Sheba Medical Center in Ramat Gan, Israel, on January 9.
Israeli Prime Minister Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is ready to receive the second Covid-19 vaccine at Sheba Medical Center in Ramat Gan, Israel, on January 9. Miriam Elster/AP

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has received his second dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech anti-coronavirus vaccine, along with Health Minister Yuli Edelstein.

I am used to it but I am excited and I am certain that all citizens of Israel who are about to receive the second dose of the vaccine are excited like me,” he said.

Israel is making steady progress vaccinating its citizens against Covid-19 and Netanyahu has repeated that all Israeli citizens will be vaccinated by the end of March.

Earlier on Saturday, the Health Ministry announced four cases of the South African Covid-19 variant, the first such cases reported in the country.

The Ministry reported the cases consisted of two contagion chains -- one from a person returning from South Africa, and from a family infected by a returnee.