March 2 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Brett McKeehan, Rob Picheta, Kareem Khadder and Ed Upright, CNN

Updated 0711 GMT (1511 HKT) March 3, 2021
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10:56 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

Venezuela receives 500-thousand doses of China’s Sinopharm vaccine

From CNN’s Stefano Pozzebon, Juan Carlos Paz and Mitchell McCluskey

A shipment of China's Sinopharm vaccine is unloaded in Caracas, Venezuela, on March 1.
A shipment of China's Sinopharm vaccine is unloaded in Caracas, Venezuela, on March 1. Manaure Quintero/Reuters

Venezuela has received 500-thousand doses of the Sinopharm vaccine developed by China, President Nicolás Maduro announced.

“With great joy I announce that at this moment 500 thousand doses of Covid-19 vaccines are arriving in Venezuela, from the People's Republic of China. This is wonderful news that fills us with great hope. Soon, we will begin the mass vaccination of our people,” Maduro said on Twitter.

The vaccines, along with a load of medical supplies, such as masks and Covid-19 tests, landed at the Simón Bolivar Airport in Caracas late Monday night, the Venezuelan government reported.

The Venezuelan Ministry of Health approved the use of the Sinopharm vaccine on Monday.

“On behalf of the People of Venezuela, I thank our brother President Xi Jinping and the noble Chinese people, for their unwavering spirit of cooperation and solidarity towards our beloved homeland,” Maduro said.

This is the second shipment of vaccines to reach Venezuela, which received 100,000 of the Russian Sputnik V vaccine in early February.

Venezuela is also in line to receive a share of vaccines through the World Health Organization’s COVAX program, but negotiations have stalled due to the political situation in the country. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), which handles COVAX distribution in the Americas, has previously said Venezuela would receive their share of vaccines as soon as their payment and delivery processes are finalized.

Venezuela currently has at least 139,545 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and 1,348 recorded deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

10:19 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

Paris mayor says a weekend lockdown would be "inhumane"

From CNN’s Antonella Francini 

Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo speaks during a press conference on Monday, March 1.
Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo speaks during a press conference on Monday, March 1. Jacques Witt/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo opposed the government’s proposal to impose a weekend lockdown in the French capital in an effort to fight the rise in Covid-19 cases.

“I disagreed with this proposal. A proposal that I find difficult, hard and even inhumane,” Hidalgo said in a televised address Monday. 

“Many residents here live in cramped apartments with no outdoor space, sometimes there are several generations under the same roof,” she said following a meeting with a government representative.

She offered softer proposals instead such as teaching classes outside during the week, in an effort to bring case numbers down. 

“We will make our playgrounds and public gardens available in an organized and secure way, which we can rearrange for this purpose,” she said. 

Government spokesperson Gabriel Attal has accused the Paris town hall of flip-flopping after a Paris deputy mayor advocated just last month for a strict three-week lockdown in Paris. 

The French Riviera and the metropolitan area of Dunkirk in northern France have been under weekend lockdowns since last Friday.  

President Emmanuel Macron is expected to hold a Defense council meeting Wednesday to discuss new restrictions.

9:41 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

COVAX to deliver more than 230 million vaccine doses by end of May, WHO says

From CNN's Nina Avramova

The COVAX program will deliver 237 million doses of Covid-19 vaccines to some 142 countries by the end of May, the World Health Organization's Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced today. 

COVAX is a program run by a coalition that includes the Vaccine Alliance known as Gavi and the World Health Organization (WHO), and is funded by donations from governments, multilateral institutions and foundations. Its mission is to buy coronavirus vaccines in bulk and send them to poorer nations that can't compete with wealthy countries in securing contracts with the major drug companies.

During a virtual press briefing, Tedros said that when the history of the pandemic is written, Covax “will be one of its standout successes.”  

This week alone, COVAX will deliver a total of 11 million doses, according to Tedros.  

“When the Covid-19 pandemic erupted last year, we knew that vaccines would be a vital tool in bringing it under control. But we also knew from our experience with HIV, the H1N1 pandemic and other diseases that market forces alone would not deliver the equitable distribution of vaccines,” Tedros said. 

The vaccine rollout by the program is already underway, with Ghana and the Ivory Coast becoming the first countries to receive doses through COVAX last week, according to Tedros.

9:05 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

Europe's unified vaccine strategy is falling apart

From CNN's Zamira Rahim

A patient receives a dose of the Russian Sputnik V vaccine in Nagykata, Hungary, on February 24.
A patient receives a dose of the Russian Sputnik V vaccine in Nagykata, Hungary, on February 24. Tibor Illyes/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

The European Union's 27-nation vaccine strategy is splintering as member states turn to nations outside the bloc to boost a faltering rollout plagued by supply issues, contract skirmishes and sluggish takeup.

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz announced Monday that he intends to work with Israel and Denmark on future vaccine production and cooperation around developing further shots to combat new coronavirus mutations. He will visit Israel with Danish leader Mette Frederiksen on Thursday.

The Austrian leader has been sharply critical of the EU's vaccine strategy and the bloc's regulator, the European Medicines Agency. The EU authorized the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine in late December 2020, weeks after it had been granted approval in the UK and US.

Brussels has opted for a centralized approach to vaccine procurement and distribution but its plan has been hindered by supply and distribution problems. Only 5.5% of the EU's population of 447 million has received a first vaccine dose, according to data from the World Health Organization (WHO).

Other EU nations have turned to Russia and China to plug the gaps in vaccine supply through unilateral procurements. On Monday, Slovakia granted emergency authorization for Moscow's Sputnik V vaccine, following a delay in supply of the Pfizer and AstraZeneca shots.

The EMA has not yet given the green light to the Sputnik V vaccine. "The [Slovakia] approval is based on the results of the clinical trials of Sputnik V in Russia and a comprehensive assessment of the vaccine by experts in Slovakia," the Russian Direct Investment Fund, which backed Sputnik V's production, said Monday.

Read the full article here.

1:16 p.m. ET, March 2, 2021

Africa's most populous country receives its first Covid-19 shots

From CNN's Nimi Princewill

The first batch of Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine doses are offloaded from a plane at  Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport in Abuja, Nigeria, on March 2.
The first batch of Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine doses are offloaded from a plane at Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport in Abuja, Nigeria, on March 2. Kola Sulaimon/AFP/Getty Images

Nigeria today received nearly 4 million doses of the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine, its health ministry announced on social media. 

The country's National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA) said on Monday that Nigeria would take delivery of 3.92 million doses of the shot, the first arrival of a Covid-19 vaccine in Africa's most populous nation. 

Nigeria is now the third West African country to receive the coronavirus vaccine -- joining neighbors Ghana and Ivory Coast -- which have all been supplied through the COVAX program.

COVAX is a global initiative that helps poorer and smaller countries gain access to Covid-19 vaccines.

Faisal Shuaib, who heads the NPHCDA, said in a statement Monday that Nigeria's vaccine rollout would start "with critical healthcare workers, who are in the frontline."

"We are fully prepared to receive and deliver the vaccine to eligible Nigerians as we have commenced the training of health workers and ensured that cold chain facilities are ready at all levels. We have a robust cold chain system that can store all types of Covid-19 vaccine in accordance with the required temperature," Shuaib added.

In a follow-up statement on social media Monday, Shuaib said a website had been launched to register Nigerians for Covid-19 vaccination.

Nigeria plans to inoculate at least 70% of its population aged 18 and above. This, the NPHCDA said, would be done in four phases within two years. 

UNICEF's representative in Nigeria, Peter Hawkins, said more vaccines will be sent to the country -- adding that the arrival of the first 3.92 million doses of the AstraZeneca shot was part of 16 million doses that were allocated earlier.

At least 156,017 Nigerians have been infected with Covid-19 and 1,915 have died from Covid-related complications, according to the country's official count. 

Findings of a survey released last month by the Nigeria Center for Disease Control and a national institute for medical research suggest that more Nigerians have had the coronavirus than official records show. 

Read more about COVAX here:

8:56 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

Biden to announce Merck will work with competitor Johnson & Johnson to manufacture coronavirus vaccine

From CNN's Jeff Zeleny, John Harwood and Kristen Holmes 

An employee packs a box of the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine into a cooler for shipping from pharmaceutical distributor McKesson Corporation's facility, in Shepherdsville, Kentucky, on March 1.
An employee packs a box of the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine into a cooler for shipping from pharmaceutical distributor McKesson Corporation's facility, in Shepherdsville, Kentucky, on March 1. Timothy D. Easley-Pool/Getty Images

President Biden is expected to announce later today that Merck & Co. will partner with Johnson & Johnson to help manufacture the company's coronavirus vaccine, administration officials familiar with the matter confirmed to CNN.

One official added that Biden will address it during his remarks at the White House this afternoon, hailing the partnership as a way to quickly jumpstart the sluggish vaccine production.

The planned partnership was first reported by The Washington Post.

Merck is expected to dedicate two of its facilities to helping Johnson & Johnson, an administration official said, in a rare partnership between two competitors.

Merck had been working on developing its own Covid-19 vaccine, but discontinued its effort at the end of January after early studies showed immune responses were inferior to natural infection and other Covid-19 vaccines.

8:16 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

The Covid-19 variant first found in Brazil is up to 2.2 times more transmissible, new study finds

From CNN's Meera Senthilingam

Workers hand out coronavirus testing kits in Bristol, England, on March 1, after three returning residents of a neighboring region were found to have been infected with the Covid-19 variant first detected in Brazil.
Workers hand out coronavirus testing kits in Bristol, England, on March 1, after three returning residents of a neighboring region were found to have been infected with the Covid-19 variant first detected in Brazil. Matthew Horwood/Getty Images

A coronavirus variant of concern first reported in Brazil, known as P.1, may be up to 2.2 times more transmissible and could evade immunity from previous Covid-19 infection by up to 61%, a new modelling study by researchers in Brazil and the UK suggests. 

The preprint, which has not yet been peer-reviewed or published in a medical journal, finds that P.1 was associated with the surge in coronavirus cases seen in Manaus, Brazil, during a second wave toward the end of 2020. It’s thought this explains the resurgence despite high levels of existing immunity in the community from the first wave. 

The team sequenced viruses sampled from people infected with coronavirus between November 2020 and January 2021 in Manaus, where the new variant was first detected, and found the proportion of samples with this variant rose from 0 to 87% within seven weeks. 

They also identified 17 mutations, including 10 in the surface spike protein, used by the virus to enter cells. Three of the mutations in the spike protein are linked to helping the virus bind to human cells. These include the N501Y mutation also found in the variants first found in the UK and South Africa and thought to help the virus bind more easily to human cells and the E484K mutation also found in the South African variant, which is also thought to help the virus evade existing immune responses.  

When investigating how these changes affect the ability of the virus to cause infections, the models created from the data showed the P.1 variant to be 1.4 to 2.2 times more transmissible than other variants as well as the original coronavirus strain, and 25% to 65% more likely to evade existing protective immunity from previous non-P.1 infections, making people susceptible to reinfection.  

The sampling also found that the emergence and circulation of the P.1 variant of concern was due to multiple introductions of the variant within the population.  

Our results consistently suggest altered epidemiological characteristics of P1,” said Dr. Nuno Faria, reader in viral evolution at the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College London. 

But he cautioned that “our results from Manaus should not be generalized” to other contexts of variants of concern. 

“We need to see whether this is generalizable to other settings,” said Sharon Peacock, professor of public health and microbiology at the University of Cambridge. “This is relevant to where the study was done but we don’t know how that will pan out in other countries.” 

Six cases of the P.1 variant were reported in the UK this week, with a manhunt underway to find one unidentified case. The researchers commented that this is unlikely to cause a surge in cases, adding that “you need many introductions to start an epidemic, so six is very few.”  

In the United States, 10 cases of the P.1 variant have been identified in five states -- Alaska, Florida, Maryland, Minnesota and Oklahoma -- according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

8:00 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

Austria, Israel and Denmark are looking to develop vaccines against Covid-19 variants

From CNN's Antonia Mortensen, Andrew Carey and Stephanie Halasz

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz speaks at a news conference at the federal chancellery in Vienna on March 1.
Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz speaks at a news conference at the federal chancellery in Vienna on March 1. Ronald Zak/AP

Austria's leader has announced that his country is looking to start closer cooperation with Israel and Denmark to further develop vaccines against Covid-19.

Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said the effort aims to produce shots that are effective against coronavirus variants, as well as research new treatment methods, as reported by CNN’s Austrian affiliate, Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF), a public broadcaster. 

Kurz added that he will visit Israel with Danish Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen on Thursday.

The chancellor is due to meet with Austrian pharmaceutical producers today, ahead of the Israel trip, his office said in a Tuesday press release.

According to ORF, Kurz criticized the European Union’s authorization process, saying access via the bloc “was principally the right thing to do, but the European Medicines Agency is too slow in terms of authorization of pharmaceutical companies."

That is why we have to prepare for further mutations and should no longer be dependent on the European Union when it comes to vaccine production of the second generation,” Kurz said, reported ORF. 

Frederiksen echoed a similar message, saying on Danish state TV on Monday that: "The European vaccine effort can no longer stand alone."

The Danish Prime Minister pointed out that this is the reason that the countries are cooperating.

Frederiksen said that if she could fill the plane with surplus vaccines when she travels back home from Israel at the end of the week, she would. 

“We must have vaccine production skyrocketing. One of the partners I believe in a lot is Israel,” she added. “All countries that have vaccines in surplus -- we would like to buy them.”

7:21 a.m. ET, March 2, 2021

In Mexico, whole towns are rejecting Covid-19 shots

From CNN's Rafael Romo

For Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, vaccinating all Mexicans is a matter of responsible national health policy as well as social justice.

"Vaccines will start arriving little by little," he said on February 15, during his daily morning press conference, a week after returning to public activities after contracting Covid-19.

"Today we launched our vaccination plan and it won't stop. We will press ahead with the goal of vaccinating all the people, according to pre-established priorities," the President added.

But there are already clear signs that not every Mexican is ready or willing to get a shot in the arm.

In Aldama, a small town of about 7,000 located in the central highlands of the southern Mexican state of Chiapas, some people say they will not get vaccinated, regardless of any vaccination plan or where the vaccine comes from.

"Why would I get vaccinated? I'm not sick. It wouldn't be good if they tried to force us to get vaccinated. I don't know," said María Magdalena López Santís, an Aldama resident to CNN in broken Spanish.

Indigenous communities like Aldama have a history of mistrust toward the federal government. In the best of cases, community leaders say, they have been ignored. In the worst of cases, they've been subjected to land-grabs, discrimination, abuse and attacks.

This time, it seems a lack of information and conspiracy theories that have spread in the region like wildfire are to blame for vaccine hesitancy.

Read the full story here: