May 10 coronavirus news

By Joshua Berlinger, Brad Lendon, Tara John, Gul Tuysuz, Aditi Sangal and Ed Upright, CNN

Updated 8:02 p.m. ET, May 10, 2021
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8:33 a.m. ET, May 10, 2021

"You've got to shut down." Fauci supports national lockdown in India's Covid catastrophe

From CNN's Helen Regan, Swati Gupta and Manveena Suri

Ambulance service employees seal the coffin of a Covid-19 victim before burial at a cemetery in the village of Pali, near Faridabad, in India on May 8.
Ambulance service employees seal the coffin of a Covid-19 victim before burial at a cemetery in the village of Pali, near Faridabad, in India on May 8. Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is under increasing pressure to impose a nationwide lockdown as the country grapples with the world's worst Covid-19 outbreak.

The spiraling crisis is stretching India's health care system beyond breaking point. Beds, oxygen and medical workers are in short supply. Some Covid patients are dying in waiting rooms or outside overwhelmed clinics, before they have even been seen by a doctor.

While more than half of Indian states and union territories have implemented their own shutdowns to deal with the second wave, there are intensifying demands for India to impose a second national lockdown.

Calls for lockdown: On Sunday, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and top White House coronavirus adviser, also said he believed India should lock down.

You've got to shut down. I believe several of the Indian states have already done that, but you need to break the chain of transmission, and one of the ways to do that is to shut down," Fauci said on ABC's "This Week."

In a separate interview with CNN affiliate CNN News18 on Friday, Fauci added such a lockdown was needed to "get ahead of the trajectory of the outbreak."

Fungal infection: This comes after the Indian government flagged cases of a fungal infection, known as mucormycosis, among Covid-19 patients during a Friday press briefing.

The infection is generally seen in diabetic patients or those who have a suppressed immune system, and affects "the sinuses or the lungs after inhaling fungal spores from the air,” according to an information page from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“When it pools with the situation with Covid-19, then you must remember there are two other elements that come into picture," Dr. V.K. Paul, a member of Niti Aayog, an Indian government-run think-tank, said Friday. "One that we are using drugs that suppress the immune system -- we are using a class of drugs which is life-saving, steroids,”

“Besides this, when a Covid patient is given oxygen, there is a humidifier which has water in it, and the tendency to get the fungal infection increases,” he added.

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7:51 a.m. ET, May 10, 2021

Unequal access to Covid immunization amounts to "vaccine apartheid," says South African President

From CNN's David McKenzie in Johannesburg

A nurse prepares a Covid-19 vaccine dose in Nairobi, Kenya, on April 21.
A nurse prepares a Covid-19 vaccine dose in Nairobi, Kenya, on April 21. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

Allowing millions of people to die in poorer countries while wealthy countries immunize their populations could amount to “vaccine apartheid,” according to South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, who also expressed his support for the proposal to waive patent rights for coronavirus shots.

“A situation in which the populations of advanced, rich countries are safely inoculated while millions in poorer countries die in the queue would be tantamount to vaccine apartheid,” Ramaphosa said in statement Monday.

If the international community is "truly committed to human rights and the values of equality and non-discrimination, vaccines should be viewed as a global public good,” he said.

They should be made available to all, not just to the highest bidders,” Ramaphosa added. 

Signs of change: Last week, the Biden administration announced that it is supporting the temporary waiver on intellectual property rights of Covid-19 vaccines at the World Trade Organization.

The waiver on patents that belong to pharmaceutical companies would allow other nations to develop generic versions of the drugs.

Some experts say that even with patents waivers, much of the developing world doesn't necessarily have the means to produce vaccines at the scale needed. They say there is an urgent need to simply share more of the rich world's vaccines and to transfer technology to help poorer countries manufacture shots further down the line.

Read more: 

12:24 p.m. ET, May 10, 2021

Germany to offer Johnson & Johnson vaccine to all adults

From CNN's Claudia Otto in Berlin

A person receives the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine in Düsseldorf, Germany, on May 3.
A person receives the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine in Düsseldorf, Germany, on May 3. Federico Gambarini/dpa/picture alliance/Getty Images

Germany will open up the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine to those under the age of 60, as long as they speak to a doctor beforehand.

In April, Europe's medicines regulator said it has found a possible link between the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine and rare blood clots, but emphasized that the overall benefits of getting the shot outweigh the risks.

Germany's decision to open up the Johnson & Johnson shot to the young age groups reflects the country's progress in immunizing seniors, Health Minister Jens Spahn told a press conference Monday.

He added that he expected everyone aged 60 and above to have been offered a shot by late May or early June.

With Germany due to receive another delivery of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine -- of around 10 million doses by July -- Spahn said it made sense to allow the shot to be more widely available.

The announcement follows new legislation that came into force in the country over the weekend, which allows more freedoms for the fully vaccinated and those who have recovered from Covid-19.

Following a shaky start, Germany has sped up its vaccination program. So far, 32.3% of the population has received at least a first dose of coronavirus vaccine, and 9.1% are fully vaccinated, according to the health ministry.

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6:35 a.m. ET, May 10, 2021

Optimism is growing in the US. Here's when we might see Covid-19 cases and deaths plummet

From CNN's Christina Maxouris

While the pace of Covid-19 vaccinations may be slowing in the United States, experts are optimistic about where the country will be in just a matter of weeks.

This summer is going to seem so much closer to normal than we've had in a very long time," Dr. Jonathan Reiner, professor of medicine and surgery at George Washington University, told CNN on Sunday. "The key statistic to think about is ... what percentage of the adult population has received at least one vaccination."

Roughly 58% of US adults -- and nearly 46% of the country's total population -- have received at least one Covid-19 vaccine dose, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 34% of the US population is fully vaccinated, CDC data shows.

Once the country climbs above that 60% mark of American adults with at least one dose, Reiner says it's likely we'll begin to see Covid-19 numbers plummet.

I expect during the month of May we will see daily cases drop dramatically and deaths finally drop to quite low numbers," he said.

Other experts have also predicted life will start to look more normal even if the US hasn't yet reached "herd immunity" -- when enough people are immune to the virus, either through vaccination or previous infection, to suppress its spread.

Critical juncture: Last week, President Joe Biden set a new goal of administering at least one Covid-19 vaccine dose to 70% of American adults by July 4. But experts say getting more shots into arms will now be an uphill battle, as officials try to reach audiences who aren't as eager for a shot or who may still have challenges with access.

Read the full story:

6:01 a.m. ET, May 10, 2021

At least 24 of India's 36 states and union territories are under Covid-19 restrictions

From Manveena Suri in New Delhi

Police personnel patrol the streets of Lower Bazaar during a curfew imposed to curb the spread of Covid-19, on May 8 in Shimla, India.
Police personnel patrol the streets of Lower Bazaar during a curfew imposed to curb the spread of Covid-19, on May 8 in Shimla, India. Deepak Sansta/Hindustan Times/Getty Images

At least 24 of India's 36 states and union territories are under some form of Covid-19 restriction, according to CNN data compiled from state governments.

India is made up of 28 states and eight union territories and at least 19 are confirmed to be under complete lockdown amid the country's Covid-19 second wave.

These are the union territories under lockdown:

  • Delhi
  • Jammu and Kashmir

These are the states under lockdown:

  • Uttarakhand
  • Uttar Pradesh
  • Rajasthan
  • Himachal Pradesh
  • Mizoram
  • Odisha
  • Bihar
  • Madhya Pradesh
  • Chhattisgarh
  • Maharashtra
  • Goa
  • Gujarat
  • Kerala
  • Karnataka
  • Tamil Nadu
  • Haryana
  • Arunachal Pradesh

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has refused to impose a national lockdown. In a national address last month, he actively advocated against one.

Modi has instead advocated for "micro containment zones," where restrictions are focused on areas of concern. It's been up to states to decide when and how to implement lockdowns.

12:25 p.m. ET, May 10, 2021

Australia starts vaccinating Tokyo 2020 athletes

From CNN’s Angus Watson in Sydney 

Three time Olympian Australian swimmer Cate Campbell receives her dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at the Queensland Sports and Athletics Centre in Brisbane on May 10.
Three time Olympian Australian swimmer Cate Campbell receives her dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at the Queensland Sports and Athletics Centre in Brisbane on May 10. Patrick Hamilton/AFP/Getty Images

Australia began vaccinating its Olympic and Paralympic athletes against Covid-19 on Monday, in preparation for the Tokyo Olympics, which are scheduled to start in July.

Speaking in Brisbane, Australian Olympic Committee CEO Matt Carroll said it was not compulsory for athletes or staff to get the vaccine but hoped each would receive their first shot by “the end of next week.”

Not compulsory, highly, highly recommended, and I think hopefully the demonstration of the athletes being vaccinated today across the country is also a demonstration that the people of Australia, can get out and get vaccinated,” Carroll said.

The athletes will receive the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 shot. The other alternative, the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, has been declared by the federal government as only suitable for over-50s. 

More than 2,000 Australian athletes and support staff will travel to Japan for the games, and those returning to Australia must quarantine in managed isolation for 14 days on arrival.

Carroll added that he is “very confident” that the Tokyo games would go ahead.

“No decision has been made about spectators as yet, obviously there's no foreign spectators, that's taken a load off the uncertainty for the Japanese public," he said, adding that the International Olympic Committee is doing work to explain to the Japanese public that the risk to them is very low in the Games.

Questions remain: With less than three months to go before the start of the summer Olympics, already postponed for a year due to the coronavirus, questions still remain over how Tokyo can hold the global event and keep volunteers, athletes, officials and the Japanese public safe from virus.

Read more:

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4:57 a.m. ET, May 10, 2021

Hundreds party as coronavirus curfew ends in most of Spain

From CNN's Al Goodman and Duarte Mendonça

People celebrate the end of the coronavirus curfew in Barcelona, Spain on May 9.
People celebrate the end of the coronavirus curfew in Barcelona, Spain on May 9. Pau de la Calle/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Hundreds of people partied in several cities across Spain in the early hours of Sunday, as the country ended its 11 p.m. curfew, which was lifted in 13 of the country's 17 regions at midnight.

Footage was shared of people taking to the beaches of Barcelona and the streets of Madrid to celebrate the end of Spain's six-month state of emergency to combat the Covid-19 pandemic. Many people could be seen without a mask, not respecting social distancing, and gathering in groups much larger than six -- all in violation of coronavirus restrictions that remain in place.

In one video during the final hours of curfew Saturday night, a police van patrolling Barcelona beach warns crowds over a loudspeaker: "It's forbidden to gather in groups of more than six people, please leave the beach."

Why now: After a strict stay-at-home order was issued last spring at the start of pandemic, Spain's second state of emergency went into effect last October. It allowed more activity but still included a nationwide late-night curfew, and restrictions on social gatherings and travel within Spain.

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3:18 a.m. ET, May 10, 2021

Sri Lanka reports new record-high number of Covid-19 cases in a day

From journalist Iqbal Athas in Colombo, Sri Lanka

Health workers wearing protective gear collect swab samples from residents to test for Covid-19 in Colombo, Sri Lanka on May 4.
Health workers wearing protective gear collect swab samples from residents to test for Covid-19 in Colombo, Sri Lanka on May 4. Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images

Sri Lankan authorities reported another 2,659 Covid-19 cases on Monday, a new single-day record for the island nation.

Sri Lanka's spike comes as other countries in South Asia, especially India, are battling their own surges of Covid-19 and shortages of equipment to treat the rising number of cases.

Sri Lankan Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa has asked China to help supply Sri Lanka with oxygen supplies such as nasal inflow machines and oxygen regulators.

Twenty-two Covid-19 related deaths were reported Monday as well. To date, at least 801 people in Sri Lanka have died of Covid-19.

2:32 a.m. ET, May 10, 2021

Malaysia bars long-distance travel to stop Covid-19 from spreading

From CNN’s Sophie Jeong in Hong Kong

Malaysia banned all interstate and inter-district travel for four weeks starting from Monday to curb the spread of Covid-19, the country's Bernama News Agency reported.

People in Malaysia will not be allowed to travel between districts or states unless they receive permission from police.

Malaysia's Ministry of Health has detected 46 Covid-19 clusters linked to cross-state activities since December 7. Those clusters account for 6,044 Covid-19 cases, Bernama reported.

Malaysia has confirmed 440,677 coronavirus cases throughout the pandemic, according to Johns Hopkins University. At least 1,683 people have died.