December 14 coronavirus news

By Jessie Yeung, Adam Renton, Emma Reynolds, Ed Upright, Melissa Macaya and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 4:06 p.m. ET, December 15, 2020
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10:10 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

No Pfizer executives will “cut the line" to be vaccinated, CEO says

From CNN Health's Andrea Diaz

Albert Bourla, CEO of Pfizer, on December 14.
Albert Bourla, CEO of Pfizer, on December 14. CNN

When asked when he would get vaccinated, Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said he doesn't want to be an example of someone "cutting the line," but said "the sooner I can, I will."

"I'm 59 years old, in good health, I'm not working in the front line. So, my type is not recommended to get vaccinated," Bourla told CNBC's Meg Tirrell on Monday. 

However, Bourla stated that they are still considering the possibility for him to get vaccinated sooner than anticipated to demonstrate the safety of the vaccine to the public, and to encourage people to get vaccinated. 

"On the other hand, our company ran a lot of polls to see what would take people to believe it, and one of the highest ranking, even higher than if Joe Biden takes it, even higher than if the other President takes it, it is if the CEO of the company takes it," Bourla said.    

"So, with that in mind, I'm trying to find a way that I would get vaccinated despite that it's not my time, just to demonstrate the confidence of the company."

Additionally, Bourla said that if he does end up taking the vaccine earlier, it will not give other Pfizer executives access to the vaccine.

"We have made the decision that if we have to do that, we will not do it with our executives. So, none of the executives or board members will cut the line, they will take it as their age and occupation type is," said Bourla. 

See more here:

9:58 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

This doctor will be the first at his Michigan hospital to get the vaccine today

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Beaumont Health's Dr. Nicholas Gilpin will be the first person at his Michigan hospital to get the Pfizer vaccine this afternoon.

"I'm an infectious disease doctor, and I'm taking care of a lot of Covid patients, so I have sort of a front-line caregiver role," he told CNN. "I'm fortunate to be looked at by our health care providers as a leader. I think, as a leader, my job is to be a good ambassador for the vaccine and show our front-line staff that it is safe, and it is effective."

He added:

"I think it's important for us as health care workers to lead by example. I think that it inspires confidence in the public, if we as health care providers and physicians can get this vaccine. It sends a clear message that we believe it's safe, and I really hope the public will follow suit."

While Gilpin says he will be on a mission to advocate for the vaccine, he does not expect a lot to change in the short term.

"I'm still going to be seeing patients. I'm still going to be wearing a mask. I'm still going to be practicing hand hygiene and doing all the things that I and other physicians have been preaching about for months."

Watch the interview:

10:13 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

New York health care worker among first to get Covid-19 vaccine 

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Sandra Lindsay, a nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, is inoculated with the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine by Dr. Michelle Chester on December 14 in Queens, New York.
Sandra Lindsay, a nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center, is inoculated with the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine by Dr. Michelle Chester on December 14 in Queens, New York. Mark Lennihan/Pool/AP

New York state administered its first non-trial vaccine this morning to a health care worker. The Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine was administered to Sandra Lindsay, a critical care nurse at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens, New York City, at about 9:20 a.m. ET Monday during a livestream organized by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

After getting her first shot, Sandra said she felt hopeful:

"I feel hopeful today, relieved. I feel like healing is coming. I hope this marks the beginning of the end of a very painful time in our country. I want to instill public confidence that the vaccine is safe. We're in a pandemic and so we all need to do our part to put an end to the pandemic, and to not give up so soon. There's light at the end of the tunnel but we still need to continue to wear our mask, to social distance. I believe in science. As a nurse, my practice is guided by science, and so I trust that. What I don't trust is that if I contract Covid, I don't know how it will impact me or those who I come in contact with. So I encourage everyone to take the vaccine."

Watch the moment here:

9:43 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

Stocks pop on vaccine optimism 

From CNN’s Paul R. La Monica

US stocks posted solid gains Monday morning as the first doses of Pfizer’s and BioNTech’s Covid-19 vaccine have arrived following approval for emergency use by the FDA Friday night.

Ongoing stimulus talks are also boosting sentiment on Wall Street. 

Here's how the markets opened Monday:

  • The Dow rose about 185 points, or 0.6%.
  • The S&P 500 was also up 0.6%.
  • The Nasdaq Composite gained 0.7%.
9:54 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

New York City may face possible full pause as coronavirus cases rise, mayor says

From CNN's Melanie Schuman

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on December 14.
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on December 14. CNN

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday the possibility of a full pause and shutdown exists in the city because “we’re seeing the kind of level of infection with the coronavirus we haven’t seen since May and we have to stop momentum.” 

He made the comment during an interview with CNN’s Alisyn Camerota.

The mayor said his “number one job” is to protect the health and safety of residents.

He also noted New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo told the New York Times a larger shutdown for the city is possible.

De Blasio called this time the “last big battle against the coronavirus here in New York City” on the same day the vaccine arrived in the city.

WATCH:

10:00 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

Watch the University of Michigan Hospital get its first batch of the Covid-19 vaccine

From CNN's Aditi Sangal and Susannah Cullinane

The first Pfizer vaccine shipment arrives via UPS at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor on December 14.
The first Pfizer vaccine shipment arrives via UPS at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor on December 14. CNN

A UPS delivery woman received a round of applause as she delivered the first batch of the coronavirus vaccine to the University of Michigan Hospital this morning.

Eleven months after the earliest recorded case of coronavirus in the United States, medical workers are preparing to give the first doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine today.

Thousands of vials of the vaccine were collected for distribution across the country Sunday after it passed its last regulatory hurdle.

Watch the moment:

9:18 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

First Covid-19 vaccine doses arrive at GWU hospital in Washington, DC

From CNN's Ellie Kaufman and Sara Murray

George Washington University hospital’s first doses of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine were delivered this morning.

Around 8 a.m. ET, 975 doses were delivered. The doses arrived in a large white box. 

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar and Surgeon General Jerome Adams are expected to be onsite to see some of the first healthcare workers at the hospital get vaccinated later today.

CNN's Sara Murray reports from the scene:

8:47 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

First coronavirus vaccines will arrive in Northwest Louisiana by late morning

From CNN's Tina Burnside 

Willis-Knighton Health System in Shreveport, Louisiana, will receive their first shipment of the Pfizer vaccine by 11:30 a.m. ET Monday morning, Public Relations Manager Terrie Roberts tells CNN. 

Roberts says about 975 doses will be arriving at their facility via UPS and will then be distributed at their campuses in the Shreveport-Bossier area thereafter. 

The first recipients of the vaccine will be the critical frontline healthcare workers, Roberts said. 

Read more about the vaccines' roll out here.

8:47 a.m. ET, December 14, 2020

US Health secretary urges Americans to get Pfizer vaccine: "This is a 94% effective vaccine"

From CNN Health's Andrea Diaz and Susannah Cullinane

Alex Azar, US secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a press briefing at the White House on November 19.
Alex Azar, US secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a press briefing at the White House on November 19. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

"This is a 94% effective vaccine. It's going through every, every, aspect of FDA process with integrity and transparent data," US Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar told NBC’s Savannah Guthrie Monday on “Today.”

"If you are recommended to get it and it's available for you, oh, please do get it. Protect yourself and protect those around you. Please get the vaccine," Azar said.

He reiterated that the US should have enough vaccine to inoculate 20 million people by the end of the month.

"We know we have a vaccine available to get to 20 million people by the end of December, and then a total of 50 million by the end of January, and, as Dr. Slaoui said, 100 million people by the end of March – but should have 100 million shots in arms by the end of February, between first and second doses."

More on the vaccine: Eleven months after the earliest recorded case of coronavirus in the United States, medical workers are preparing to give the first doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine, with deliveries set to arrive at administration sites this morning.

Thousands of vials of the vaccine were collected for distribution across the country Sunday after it passed its last regulatory hurdle.

It's up to states to allocate their share of vaccines, but the CDC has recommended that frontline health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities get the vaccine first. Officials warn it could be months before the vaccine becomes available to many Americans as the virus continues to surge, breaking grim state and national records.

CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta provides analysis: