July 29 Tokyo 2020 Olympics news and results

By Matias Grez, Ben Church, Helen Regan, Aditi Sangal, Adam Renton, Melissa Macaya, Melissa Mahtani and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 12:00 a.m. ET, July 30, 2021
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4:12 p.m. ET, July 29, 2021

See the moment Sunisa Lee's family reacts to her all-around gymnastics gold

Shyenne Lee celebrates at a watch party in Oakdale, Minnesota, after her sister Sunisa Lee, of Team United States won gold in the all-around gymnastics final on July 29.
Shyenne Lee celebrates at a watch party in Oakdale, Minnesota, after her sister Sunisa Lee, of Team United States won gold in the all-around gymnastics final on July 29. (Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

Sunisa Lee's parents and sister were captured watching her win gold for Team USA in the all-around event.

The family can be seen cheering her on from Oakdale, Minnesota, alongside other fans.

Lee scored 57.433 to finish ahead of Brazil's Rebeca Andrade in second and the Russian Olympic Committee's Angelina Melnikova in third, extending a run of five all-around Olympic golds for the USA.

The 18-year-old is the fifth American woman in a row to win the event and is the first ever Hmong-American Olympic gymnast.

See the moment:

John Lee, father of Sunisa Lee of Team United States, celebrates at a watch party in Oakdale, Minnesota, after Sunisa won gold in the all-around gymnastics final on July 29.
John Lee, father of Sunisa Lee of Team United States, celebrates at a watch party in Oakdale, Minnesota, after Sunisa won gold in the all-around gymnastics final on July 29. (Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)

9:40 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

Sunisa Lee: Meet Team USA's gold medalist for the women's individual all-around final

From CNN's Alyssa Kraus

TOKYO, JAPAN - JULY 29: Sunisa Lee of Team United States reacts after competing on uneven bars during the Women's All-Around Final on day six of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Gymnastics Centre on July 29, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by
TOKYO, JAPAN - JULY 29: Sunisa Lee of Team United States reacts after competing on uneven bars during the Women's All-Around Final on day six of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Gymnastics Centre on July 29, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Sunisa "Suni" Lee won the gold medal in the women's individual all-around gymnastics final today, as Simone Biles cheered from the stands at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre.

Lee, with a score of 57.433, is now the fifth American woman in a row to win the event.

Despite the high-pressure of the Olympics, her parents remained confident that Lee can handle the intensity, especially since she has persevered through a family tragedy at home.

In 2019, Lee's father John suffered an accident that left him paralyzed, and he says that put her under a lot of stress.

"Sunisa's been competing under pressure all the way, I think, ever since I got injured in 2019 up to now, up to the point where she made the Olympics," her father said.

The 18-year-old gymnast from Saint Paul, Minnesota, said her favorite event to compete in is beam, according to her biography on Team USA's website. Lee, who earned a silver medal with Team USA during the women's team finals earlier this week, began gymnastics when she was six years old.

Following the Olympic Games, Lee will attend Auburn University as part of the class of 2025 and will compete for the university's gymnastics team.

Outside of the gym, the 5-foot gymnast said she enjoys fishing and camping and the Harry Potter books.

In August 2019, Lee expressed that her biggest ambition was to compete in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Now, Lee is an Olympic medalist, winning both silver and gold this week.

In an Instagram post from Sunday, Lee wrote, "feeling proud and blessed. thank you to everyone who has shown me nothing but their love and support."

9:26 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

USA's Sunisa Lee wins gold in the women's individual all-around gymnastics final

USA's Sunisa Lee competes on balance beam during the all-around final on July 29.
USA's Sunisa Lee competes on balance beam during the all-around final on July 29. (Julian Finney/Getty Images)

Sunisa Lee of Team USA has won the gold medal in women's individual all-around gymnastics final.

The 18-year-old is the fifth American woman in a row to win the event and is the first ever Hmong-American Olympic gymnast.

USA's Simone Biles — who had been favored to win the event — dropped out to focus on her mental health.

Lee scored 57.433 points to edge out Brazil’s Rebeca Andrade, who won the silver.

Andrade, who becomes Brazil's first ever women's gymnastics medalist, scored 57.298.

The Russian Olympic Committee’s Angelina Melnikova finished with the bronze. 

Lee’s stunning victory was sealed with Biles watching and celebrating in the stands at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre.

Team USA has now won the women's all-around at each of the past five Olympic Games, since Simona Amanar’s victory for Romania at the 2000 Games in Sydney.

Thursday’s victory also sees Team USA draw level with the Soviet Union with a record six wins in the event – the Soviet Union winning the event six times between 1952 and 1988.

8:00 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

Novak Djokovic thankful for tennis scheduling amid "brutal" Tokyo conditions

From CNN's Ben Church

Serbia's Novak Djokovic plays a backhand during his quarterfinal match against Japan's Kei Nishikori on July 29.
Serbia's Novak Djokovic plays a backhand during his quarterfinal match against Japan's Kei Nishikori on July 29. (Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

Novak Djokovic progressed into the semifinals of the men's tennis competition after beating Japan's Kei Nishikori in straight sets -- 6-2 6-0 -- at Ariake Tennis Park on Thursday.

The Serbian said he was relieved the match was played later in the Tokyo afternoon, offering some welcome relief from the extreme heat.

“It’s great that we’re playing in the afternoon hours, so we don’t experience too much heat, although it’s still very, very humid," he said after the win.
"It’s a bit easier, more pleasant to play in the afternoon."

It comes after Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) player Daniil Medvedev raised concerns about playing in the heat earlier this week.

He appeared to struggle during his third round men's singles match against Italian Fabio Fognini and asked the chair umpire who would take responsibility if he were to die on court.

Tennis organizers moved the start time for tennis matches to 3 p.m. local beginning on Thursday after more players expressed dissatisfaction with the playing conditions.

The new start time made all the difference for Djokovic, who is chasing the first ever men's "Golden Slam."

“It was fantastic. Playing after five [o'clock local time] is completely different," he added.
"Obviously, there is a little bit of a breeze, but still very, very humid, you sweat a lot, but you don’t have the heat, you don’t have the sun that in combination with the humidity, it’s just brutal.”
7:21 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

Simone Biles is at the women’s all-around gymnastics final as she cheers on Team USA

From CNN’s Aleks Klosok in London

USA's Simone Biles waves from the the stands during the all-around gymnastics final on July 29.
USA's Simone Biles waves from the the stands during the all-around gymnastics final on July 29. (Mike Egerton/PA Images/Getty Images)

Simone Biles is at the women’s all-around gymnastics final, which is underway at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre in Tokyo on Thursday.

Sitting in the stands, Biles waved and cheered on her fellow Team USA gymnasts competing in the event.

The 24-year-old, who pulled out of the all-around competition on Wednesday to focus on her mental health, was the defending champion. 

Victory for Team USA in Thursday’s all-around event would see them equal the Soviet Union’s all-time record of six wins.

6:56 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

Women's all-around gymnastics final is underway

From CNN's George Ramsay at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre

The Ariake Gymnastics Centre is pictured ahead of the women's all-around gymnastics final on Thursday, July 29.
The Ariake Gymnastics Centre is pictured ahead of the women's all-around gymnastics final on Thursday, July 29. George Ramsay/CNN

There’s quite a bit of process and protocol going into each Olympic venue -- temperature checks, hand sanitization and security scans. That’s the case at Tokyo’s Ariake Gymnastics Centre, where the women’s all-around gymnastics final is now underway.

The buildup to this event has been dominated by Simone Biles’ withdrawal on Wednesday. The four-time Olympic gold medalist and reigning all-around champion is protecting her mental health, USA Gymnastics said, having stepped away from the team competition earlier this week.

Biles was the top qualifier ahead of Brazil’s Rebeca Andrade and teammate Sunisa Lee for the all-around competition. Those two will likely face strong competition from Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) athletes Angelina Melnikova and Vladislava Urazova, who formed part of the squad that took team gold ahead of the US on Tuesday.

From left: Team USA (silver), Team ROC (gold) and Team Great Britain (bronze) pose during the podium ceremony of the artistic gymnastics women's team final on July 27.
From left: Team USA (silver), Team ROC (gold) and Team Great Britain (bronze) pose during the podium ceremony of the artistic gymnastics women's team final on July 27. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

Sydney 2000 Olympics was the last time an athlete outside the US won all-around gold. Could that run be about to end?

7:14 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

Japan Medical Association fears medical system will collapse if Covid-19 surge continues

From CNN's Chie Kobayashi, Arthur Syin and Chandler Thornton

People walk across a busy crossing in Tokyo on July 24.
People walk across a busy crossing in Tokyo on July 24. (Kantaro Komiya/AP)

The Japan Medical Association, the country's largest association of doctors, issued an emergency request to Japan's capital to enhance urgency surrounding the Covid-19 surge.

The head of the association, Toshio Nakagawa, called on people to work remotely and complete vaccinations for people aged between 40 and 64, in a televised address on Thursday.

“We think the medical system will collapse, if this spread of infection continues," Nakagawa said, adding that medical workers are feeling the strain of the spike in cases.

“We have to take all the measures to avoid the explosion of infection and medical system goes under strain," Nakagawa added. 

"As a person who is engaged in medicine, we’d like to issue our emergency statement to the government.

"We hope this will be reflected in the future measurement."

The association also urged the government to make more vaccines available to the public.

Tokyo reported a record number of new cases Thursday for the third consecutive day, adding 3,865 new cases. Nationwide, Japan reported 10,385 new cases -- the first time the country has topped 10,000 new cases since the pandemic began.

This comes as the Games continues full steam ahead, nearing the end of its sixth day of official competition. Tokyo 2020 has reported 198 cases linked to the Games so far.

  

6:08 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

How Caeleb Dressel prepared for the Olympics during a pandemic

From CNN's Coy Wire and Matias Grez

US swimming superstar Caeleb Dressel has already won two gold medals at Tokyo 2020 -- and he's aiming for five more.

As with every athlete competing at these Olympic Games, Dressel's preparation was derailed last year by the coronavirus pandemic.

Many of us around the world struggled to find motivation, fight boredom and avoid unhealthy food binges during lockdown ... and Dressel was no different.

For somebody with a sweet tooth -- Dressel says his dream cheat meal is scoffing an entire family pack of Oreos -- it was particularly difficult sharing a house with an excellent baker!

His trainer tailored his workout plans to ensure the 24-year-old didn't burn out during the additional year of Olympic preparation -- and it's clearly been working.

You can watch some of those unusual training sessions in the video above ... including the unconventional workout of Dressel bailing water.

10:15 a.m. ET, July 29, 2021

Team Great Britain's headquarters in Tokyo may have some of the strictest Covid-19 measures

From CNN's Rebecca Wright

Team Great Britain's headquarters in Tokyo.
Team Great Britain's headquarters in Tokyo. Bex Wright/CNN

CNN visited Team Great Britain's headquarters in Tokyo and found some of the strictest Covid-19 safety measures in place, which go well beyond Tokyo 2020 and International Olympic Committee guidelines.

The team has taken over an elementary school along the waterfront overlooking Tokyo Bay for athlete training and medical services. They have emblazoned the Union Jack design over the walls of the four-story building, and even have a rooftop garden with Union Jack deck chairs for the athletes to relax.

There is almost a blanket ban on in-person interviews until after the athletes have completed all of their events.

This is partly for preventing a potential infection, which could force athletes to drop out of the Games. The other reason for this is so the athletes can stay mentally focused.

To access the waterside complex, the CNN team went through a rigorous testing process.

Members of the media team took a rapid antigen test, also known as a lateral flow test, which give results within 15 minutes. The tests are not as accurate as PCR tests, but provide a quick indication of positive cases.

CNN interviews Team GB swimmer Tom Dean. The interviews are kept to under ten minutes.
CNN interviews Team GB swimmer Tom Dean. The interviews are kept to under ten minutes. Bex Wright/CNN

The test is self-administered, guided by a member of the Team GB contingent. The media personnel has to swab their own throat and nostrils with a long cotton swab, which is then dropped into a fluid solution in a tube. That solution is then dropped onto a small plastic testing device. After 15 minutes the results appear, showing one line for negative or two lines for positive -- similar to a pregnancy test.

After the CNN team tested negative, it was allowed to continue to the fourth-floor rooftop, where media teams are lined up to speak to their medal-winning athletes. Interviews are conducted in the outdoor rooftop space, with the reporter and athlete standing two meters apart, maintaining social distance.

The interaction lasts under 10 minutes, a sign that even though Covid-19 cases are going up rapidly at home in the UK, the team on the ground in Tokyo is taking every precaution.