August 1 Tokyo 2020 Olympics news and results

By Ben Morse, Joshua Berlinger and Adam Renton, CNN

Updated 12:01 a.m. ET, August 2, 2021
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9:01 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

Italy's Lamont Marcell Jacobs wins gold in the men's 100 meter final

From CNN's Fernando Alfonso in Atlanta

Italy's Lamont Marcell Jacobs wins the 100m final on August 1.
Italy's Lamont Marcell Jacobs wins the 100m final on August 1. (Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

Italy's Lamont Marcell Jacobs has won gold in the men's 100 meter finals with a time of 9.80.

American Fred Kerley won silver with 9.84 and Canadian Andre De Grasse took home the bronze with 9.89.

Big night for Italy: Just minutes before the 100m final, Italy's Gianmarco Tamberi and Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim were joint Olympic champions in the men's high jump after both failed to clear 2.39 meters.

They both had identical records after clearing 2.37m, so both agreed to share the gold medal and the title of Olympic champion.

8:53 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

Joint Olympic champions in men's high jump

From CNN's Ben Morse in London

Italy's Gianmarco Tamberi and Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim react after winning the gold medal in the high jump on August 01.
Italy's Gianmarco Tamberi and Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim react after winning the gold medal in the high jump on August 01. (Richard Heathcote/Getty Images)

In what was a heartwarming scene, there were joint Olympic gold medal winners in the men's high jump.

Both Italy's Gianmarco Tamberi and Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim tried, and failed, to clear 2.39m.

They both had identical records after clearing 2.37m, so both agreed to share the gold medal and the title of Olympic champion.

Both set season-best records as they pushed each other to the gold.

Maksim Nedasekau of Belarus won bronze on countback having also cleared 2.37m.

9:38 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

Yulimar Rojas smashes world record on the way to triple jump gold

From CNN's Ben Morse in London

Yulimar Rojas of Venezuela celebrates after setting a new world in the triple jump final on August 1.
Yulimar Rojas of Venezuela celebrates after setting a new world in the triple jump final on August 1. (Vegard Wivestad Grøtt/Bildbyran/Reuters)

The anticipation for the women's triple jump built up throughout the evening, but Yulimar Rojas had one hand on the gold medal from her very first jump.

On her opening attempt, the Venezuelan jumper leapt 15.41m to break the Olympic record.

On her last jump of the evening, she smashed the world record, jumping 15.67m to claim her first Olympic gold medal.

Rojas broke a record that had stood since 1995 set by Ukrainian Inessa Kravets.

Patricia Mamona of Portugal and Spain's Ana Peleteiro completed the podium, both setting national records on their way to the silver and bronze medals respectively

8:34 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

"Highest number of people I have seen watching any event so far": Athletics atmosphere heating up

From CNN's Ben Morse and Bex Wright

Athletes and officials look on from the stands on August 1 at the Olympic Stadium.
Athletes and officials look on from the stands on August 1 at the Olympic Stadium. (Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

Although fans aren't allowed to attend athletics events in Tokyo, that hasn't stopped the athletes from trying to build an atmosphere.

During the men's high jump final, some of the participants -- in particular, Gianmarco Tamberi of Italy -- attempted to hype up the crowd and get them to clap while the competitors jumped.

As well as the help from the athletes, there were even some small pockets of other staff seen in the stands.

"The Olympic Stadium has the highest number of people I have seen watching any event so far," CNN producer Bex Wright reported from Tokyo.

"The high jumpers in particular have been encouraging the crowd support. The Italian [Tamberi] in the men’s high jump was leading a crowd clap, and the world champion from Qatar [Mutaz Essa Barshim] and the NZ guy [Hamish Kerr] were getting a lot of cheers."

8:04 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

"This is so much bigger than anything else in sports, especially in tennis": Alexander Zverev on winning gold in men's singles tennis

Germany's Alexander Zverev reacts after winning the tennis single's gold against the ROC's Karen Khachanov on August 1.
Germany's Alexander Zverev reacts after winning the tennis single's gold against the ROC's Karen Khachanov on August 1. (Patrick Semansky/AP)

He's come close to grand slam victories before, and now, 24-year-old Alexander Zverev has a standout victory to his name.

The German comfortably defeated the Russian Olympic Committee's Karen Khachanov 6-3 6-1 to take home the gold medal in the men's singles tennis on Sunday.

The 79-minute victory at the Summer Games, coming after his battling victory over world No. 1 Novak Djokovic in the semifinals, means that he is now an Olympic champion -- a feeling Zverev says he can't "compare."

"This is so much bigger than anything else in sports, especially in tennis. This is an incredible feeling me for me right now," he told the media afterwards.

"There is nothing better than this. You are not only playing for yourself, you are playing for your country. The Olympics are the biggest sporting event in the world.

"The feeling I have now, and will have -- nothing will be better."

7:31 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

Nina Derwael wins gold in uneven bars; Sunisa Lee wins bronze

From CNN's Ben Morse in London

Belgium's Nina Derwael competes in the uneven bars final on August 1.
Belgium's Nina Derwael competes in the uneven bars final on August 1. (Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

Nina Derwael of Belgium won gold in the uneven bars as the artistic gymnastics wrapped up for Sunday.

The 21-year-old produced an excellent display to earn herself a score of 15.200, ahead of Anastasiia Iliankova of the Russian Olympic Committee in second.

Derwael is a two-time world champion and a two-time European champion on the uneven bars. She competed at the 2016 Games, finishing 19th in the all-around final.

Team USA's Sunisa Lee -- who won the all-around gymnastics gold earlier this week after her teammate Simone Biles pulled out -- won the bronze medal.

The 18-year-old American picked up her third medal of the Olympics after the US won the silver in the team event.

7:21 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

If you're watching from the US, here are the Olympic events to check out today

Malaysia's Sabri Nur Dhabitah competes in the 3m springboard diving final event on August 1.
Malaysia's Sabri Nur Dhabitah competes in the 3m springboard diving final event on August 1. (Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images)

The Summer 2020 Olympic Games are well underway in Tokyo. If you're watching in the US, here's a look at some of the key events to check out today. Remember: Tokyo is 13 hours ahead of US Eastern Time, but many of the events are replayed in US primetime hours.

  • Gymnastics: There are several event finals starting at 4 a.m. ET -- the men's floor exercise, the women's vault, the men's pommel horse and the women's uneven bars. You can watch them live online, or catch replayed highlights at 7 p.m. ET on NBC.
  • Beach volleyball: NBC will cover the women's round of 16 matches live starting at 8 p.m. ET. (Remember: Because of the time difference, the event is being played Monday morning in Japan.)
  • Diving: The women's 3-meter springboard final will air live at 2 a.m. ET on USA. You can also catch replayed highlights on NBC starting at 7 p.m. ET.
  • Tennis: Germany's Alexander Zverev will play Karen Khachanov of the Russian Olympic Committee in the men's singles final. The match airs at 5:30 p.m. ET on USA.
  • Badminton: The women's singles gold medal game at Musashino Forest Sports Plaza will be broadcast live starting at 8:40 a.m. ET on NBC Sports.

Here’s your full guide on how to watch the Olympics and the entire schedule. In between watching events, check out our gallery of the most memorable photos of the Games so far.

8:13 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

With the specter of Usain Bolt gone, the men's 100m final is wide open

From CNN's George Ramsay at the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo

Runners compete in the 100m semifinals on August 1.
Runners compete in the 100m semifinals on August 1. (Antonin Thuillier/AFP/Getty Images)

After Jamaica completed a clean sweep in the women’s 100m final on Saturday, it’s now time for the men’s edition. If it can deliver even half the drama that the women’s race did -- when Elaine Thompson-Herah clocked a new Olympic record of 10.61 seconds -- then we’re in for a treat.

With less than two-tenths of a second separating all of the qualifying times from the men’s semifinals, this one is too close to call. China’s Su Bingtian was the fastest in 9.83 -- a new Asian record -- but only 0.01 seconds separated him and USA’s Ronnie Baker and Italy’s Lamont Marcell Jacobs.

Bingtian became the first Chinese man to reach the men’s 100m final. 

Trayvon Bromell, who won the US Olympic Trials in June, failed to qualify.

This will be the starting line-up at 8:50am ET:

Su Bingtian (China)

Ronnie Baker (USA)

Lamont Marcell Jacobs (Italy)

Akani Simbine (South Africa)

Fred Kerley (USA)

Zharnel Hughes (Great Britain)

Andre De Grasse (Canada)

Enoch Adegoke (Nigeria)

Usain Bolt has loomed large over this event for the past three Games. Who will be the next Olympic champion now that the Jamaican has hung up his spikes?

7:30 a.m. ET, August 1, 2021

Team GB's Max Whitlock successfully defends pommel horse Olympic title

From CNN's Ben Morse in London

Great Britain's Max Whitlock competes in the pommel horse final on August 1.
Great Britain's Max Whitlock competes in the pommel horse final on August 1. (Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

Team GB's Max Whitlock successfully defended his Olympic gold medal in the pommel horse discipline on Sunday.

Going first in the final, the 28-year-old produced a magnificent display to earn a score of 15.583, ahead of Chinese Taipei's Lee Chih-kai in second.

Japan's Kazuma Kaya took the bronze medal.

It is Whitlock's third Olympic gold medal. He won gold in the pommel horse at the 2016 Rio Games, as well as gold in the floor exercise.

He is the first man to successfully defend the pommel horse title since 1980.

At the Rio Games, Whitlock made history when he won Great Britain's first medal in the all-around event for 108 years.

Upon becoming a double Olympic champion in the pommel horse, Whitlock called the feeling "surreal."

"I can't quite comprehend what just happened. It's been a whirlwind journey, and I am massively grateful," he told the media. 

"I was on first, so it was the first time I have been able to watch a whole pommel horse final; it's just surreal. 

"I never expect medals. I like to go in with the potential to get a title if I go clean and the potential is there. And the build-up, the routine, I couldn't do anything more. 

"I am over the moon to come away with gold. 

"I try not to let my this third Olympics feel different to the others. I try to go into any Olympic Games with the same drive and hunger, but this morning I really felt the nerves. It was the most nervous I have ever felt in a competition, so it's even more remarkable that I managed to perform under this pressure."